Founded by Alastair Norcross in 2008, and co-organized by Norcross and fellow CU philosopher Ben Hale each year since its inception, the Center’s Rocky Mountain Ethics Congress (RoME) is an international four-day conference featuring three distinguished keynote speakers each year in addition to a large number of regular talks, and focusing on ethics broadly understood to include work in applied ethics and ethical theory as well as work in social, political, and legal philosophy.  In 2009, it also became one of the first ethics conferences in the country to include poster sessions as part of its program, a feature borrowed from science conferences that has since become a regular RoME fixture and that has spread to other philosophy conferences (for more on the impact of this RoME innovation within the profession, see the story on Dailynous). 

RoME is the Center’s signature annual event, widely recognized as one of the most important ethics conferences in the English-speaking world, and the Center is particularly pleased that RoME has developeda reputation not only for academic excellence but for providing a distinctively welcoming environment.  Shelly Kagan (Yale) says “I've been to two RoME Congresses, and both times I have been impressed by the high quality of the talks and the friendly atmosphere.”  Eric Wiland (Missouri, St. Louis) says “I've attended and presented at RoME three times, and it's easily the most fruitful annual moral philosophy conference in the world.  One wonderful thing about the conference is that there is room for philosophers working at all different career stages, and that the mission of the conference really does seem to be devoted to scholarship, rather than advancing a particular viewpoint.”  Cheshire Calhoun (Arizona State) calls RoME “the go-to conference for people working in ethics: a great diversity of papers, plenty of opportunity to get and give feedback, and a remarkably pleasant and collaborative atmosphere.”  And Dale Dorsey (Kansas), who has been to every RoME since its inception, stresses that while RoME has “lots of good people, good papers, open dialog, etc.,” what “really sets it apart [is] a laid back atmosphere in which people feel comfortable trying out ideas.” 

For information about this year’s RoME, click on the link at the top of the list of RoME links to the right.  Information about RoME from previous years is archived in the links below that link.  Questions to the organizers may be addressed to Alastair Norcross or Ben Hale.