M. Ben Harris (Acct’48) celebrated his 100th birthday on July 8. After graduating from Montrose High School, Harris served more than three years in World War II before returning home to earn a degree at CU, where he was a collegiate swimmer. Afterwards, he began his career as a banker. He and Jerry Hyink married in 1952 and celebrated 53 years together before her death in 2006. They have two children, four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Today, Ben lives independently in Montrose, Colorado.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Paula Dáil’s (A&S’63) tenth book, Fearless, was released in June. Inspired by a true story, the novel chronicles a Catholic nun’s fight for women’s reproductive rights within the largest, most-powerful patriarchy in the world. Paula is an award-winning non-fiction writer and emerita research professor of social welfare and public policy at Iowa State University. She lives in the Great Lakes region of the Upper Midwest with her award-winning writer husband, their dog and other wildlife. Fearless is under consideration for five book awards, including the May Sarton award for women’s fiction.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

John Quicker’s (Anth’65; PhDSoc’70) book, Before Crips: Fussin’, Cussin’, and Discussin’ among South Los Angeles Juvenile Gangs, was published by Temple University Press. Kirkus Reviews wrote that it is “a compelling sociological examination of the pre-1970 Los Angeles ‘street groups’ that improbably spawned the Crips and Bloods,” and is a “gripping urban history.” John is a professor emeritus of sociology at California State University, Dominguez Hills.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Zephyros in My Garden, an original clarinet choir composition by John Gibson (MusEdu’68; MMus’69) had its premiere performance in July at the International ClarinetFest in Reno, Nevada. With more than 950 small ensemble arrangements and compositions to his credit, John is the composer and arranger in residence for the Zephyr Clarinet Choir at Portland State University. He lives in Vancouver, Washington, with his wife, Barbara Gibson (MusEd’70).

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Judy Hickey Fahrenkrog (Edu’70) of Denver and a group of her Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority sisters from all across the U.S. and abroad have been staying in touch over the years. During the pandemic, Judy and her KKG sisters started hosting a regular Zoom happy hour. They had an in-person reunion in October 2021 in Boulder and plan to meet up again this year.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Tired of observing the expansive litter problem on Oklahoma’s Interstate 40, “Super Doc” Brad Garber (Bio’72) decided to become part of the solution. Every Friday, Garber leaves his city job as a plastic and reconstructive surgeon and heads to his family farm in the country. There, he dons his red hat, yellow-and-orange vest, 55-gallon black bag and pincher robotic tool to pick up trash along Interstate 40 and US Highway 75 South. His motto for the area is “The cleanest, greenest exit on eastbound I-40 coast to coast.” He lives in Tulsa.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Robert Fleisher (Mus’75) continues to perform and record his music, which has appeared on seven albums since he retired in 2014 as coordinator of music theory and composition at Northern Illinois University. During the first half of 2022, his score “Six Little Piano Pieces” was performed by Minato Sakamoto during the Boston New Music Initiative Prismatic Congruency video concert series; his electroacoustic “Parallel” premiered during the Earth Day Art Model International Telematic Festival; and his electroacoustic miniature, “Loretto Alfresco,” has been performed 29 times in a dozen states. Three works will be included on a Neuma Records album due out in November. In December, his toy piano miniature, “BACH (for Jan),” will premiere by David Bohn as part of the Vox Novus Fifteen Minutes of Fame series.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

After 22 years of service, Steve Coe (Jour’81) retired from the Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section of the U.S. Department of Justice. Since 2005, Steve helped investigate and prosecute individuals in the U.S. who were suspected of committing human rights violations in 1991–95 in the countries of the former Yugoslavia. Previously, he worked as a historian in the Department of Justice’s Special Investigations division. He studied Russian in the Soviet Union and received a master’s degree in Russian and East European studies from the University of Michigan in 1986 and a Ph.D. in modern Russian history in 1993.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Wendy Lynch (PE’82; MS’84; PhD’Edu) founded and runs Analytic-Translator.com, which helps convert complex analytics into business value. With more than 35 years of experience in the field, Wendy has written a book and runs an online course about becoming an analytics translator. She is a consultant to numerous Fortune 100 companies, and her current work focuses on the application of big data solutions in human capital management.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

James Michael Brodie (Engl’83) is president of The Black and Gold Project Foundation, a group of CU Boulder alumni that supports increasing the percentage of African American students, faculty and
administration at the university. On June 25, James and the foundation celebrated the 40-year career of professor William King. William began teaching Black Studies at CU in 1972 and went on to become the director of the Black Studies program. He also was a founding member of the National Council for Black Studies and eventually served as its national chairman. At the luncheon, Gary Jackson (PolSci’67; Law’70), retired senior judge of the Denver County Court and former Denver district attorney, spoke and said, “(Dr. King) was more than a legacy. He was a role model that all of us in this room could pattern our lives after.”

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Founder and principal of Kipnis Architecture + Planning (KAP), Nate Kipnis (EnvDes’83) — a fellow of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) — was honored as one of Crain’s Chicago Business’ 2022 Notable Leaders in Sustainability. The award category honors chief sustainability officers, top executives, nonprofit leaders and entrepreneurs who are leading the way in sustainable business. KAP, which has locations in Boulder and Evanston, Illinois, is recognized as a premier firm in sustainable architecture. Additionally, Nate serves on the AIA Climate Action and Design Committee.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Kimberly Coleman Burns (Jour’85) won the National Indie Excellence Award for Regional Fiction, the Western Fictioneers Peacemakers Award for Best First Western and a gold medal from the Independent Publishers Awards for her Victorian-era novel, The Mrs. Tabor. Her husband, Robert Burns (Fin’86), is a senior vice president of Pacific Investment Management Company.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

In May, the Environmental Law Institute selected Mark Laska (DistSt’85) as the business leadership winner of the National Wetlands Award. This award recognizes individuals who strive to protect wetland resources in the face of developmental and climate-related challenges. Mark — founder, president and CEO of the ecological consulting group Great Ecology —was recognized for his work as an ecological restoration practitioner.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Kathryn Willoughby’s (MBA’85) first solo exhibition, “In The Garden,” was hosted at Gallery 9 in Los Altos, California this summer. This exhibition featured more than 30 lush landscape paintings, including 12 of Bay Area gardens. In addition, she has published a companion book, In The Garden: An Artist’s View, available on Amazon and at Gallery 9. View Kathryn’s work at kathrynhilton.com.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Robin Wurtzel (Law’85) is chief counsel at the Hawai’i Civil Rights Commission. She writes that she “feels good about rounding out over 35 years of public interest law at a great government agency.” She lives in Honolulu.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Tim Tomasik (Advert’86) was sworn in as the 149th Chicago Bar Association president. Tim, founding member of Tomasik Kotin Kasserman LLC, has practiced law for nearly three decades. Among his most notable accomplishments is his work as a lead attorney on the plaintiffs’ executive committee in the World Trade Center litigation, securing a $1.2 billion settlement against the airlines for security breaches that led to the 9/11 hijackings and air crashes.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Beebe Bahrami (MCDBio’86), an award-winning writer and anthropologist known for her travel narratives, memoirs and guide- books, released The Way of the Wild Goose: Three Pilgrimages Following Geese, Stars and Hunches on the Camino de Santiago in May. In the book, Beebe recounts her experience making the 500-mile pilgrimage on the Camino de Santiago across southern France and northern Spain, and her quest to unearth the mystery of the symbol of the goose along the path.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

The Maine Freedom of Information Coalition awarded Sue Hawes (Psych’88) the 2022 Sunshine Award for her work pursuing public records from the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office. Her work exposed staffing issues at the county jail. She lives in Portland, Maine.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

Wellness services company Restore Hyper Wellness, owned and operated by Shawn Johnson (Mktg, Rec’88) and his partner Julie, opened a location in Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Restore helps people looking to manage persistent pain, reduce signs of aging, boost athletic performance and increase natural defenses.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

The national nonprofit organization Girls, Inc. D.C., named Lori McFarling (Jour’89) to their board of directors, where she serves as a member of their executive team and co-chair of fund development. Lori serves as Discovery Education’s president of social impact and corporate partnerships. She resides in Bethesda, Maryland.

Posted Nov. 7, 2022

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