Mark Nowakowski (MMus) was appointed assistant professor of music technology at Kent State University, Stark. His CD Blood Forgotten was released on June 9 through NAXOS, the world’s largest distributor of classical music. He lives with his wife and three children in Ohio, where he continues to pursue an active career in music composition, writing and teaching.

Posted Sep. 1, 2017

Last year, Bill Shutts (MechEngr; MAeroEngr’47) celebrated his 100th birthday. He began his teaching career in the 1930s in a one-room schoolhouse in Osborne, Mo. Later in his career, he worked at San Diego State University and also at the University of Texas at Austin, where he received his doctorate degree in aeronautical engineering. He was featured in a story in the U-T San Diego in May 2014. He lives in Vista, Calif.

Posted Jun. 1, 2015

Life has been full of diverse achievements for William Judd (Geol’41). He retired from Purdue University in 1987 where he served as head of the geotechnical area of the civil engineering department for 12 years. He founded the university’s research and teaching program in rock mechanics and rock engineering, which was one of the first in the nation. He earned six national and international awards, including the prestigious Hans Cloos Medal from the International Association of Engineering Geologists in 1993. At CU, he was president of the hiking club and was inducted into the Colorado Ski Museum’s Hall of Fame in 1983 for his work as national director of the National Ski Patrol. William lives in West Lafayette, Ind., and has five daughters.

Posted Mar. 1, 2012

Author Richard “Dick” Suddath* (Econ’41) published his second book, ­Ohio is Purple, written for elementary school students learning geography. His first book, A Simple Thread, is based on his father’s family history in the South before and during the Civil War and was published in 2003. Dick was owner and president of Suddath Van Lines until his retirement in 1989. He and his wife Barbara Anne Johnson* (A&S’44) live in Jacksonville, Fla.

*Directors Club

Posted Dec. 1, 2011

As part of the field artillery of the 90th infantry division in World War II, Clyde Kennedy (Acct’41) landed on Utah Beach in Normandy, France, and writes he looks forward to the 31st Army reunion in Minneapolis, Minn. For their 65th wedding anniversary, Clyde and his wife flew to Wolverhampton, England, the town where they were wed. Their two children, along with 44 other guests, attended the couple’s celebration dinner. He lives in Granada, Colo., and his parting message is “forget that someday there will be no tomorrow.”

Posted Dec. 1, 2011

Denver chapter member Lula Weeden Jacobs (A&S’42) of The Links — a nonprofit dedicated to the enrichment and sustainment of African-American culture and economic survival by women of color — appeared in The Denver Post with her daughter Yolanda Jacobs when they attended The Links luncheon celebrating its 60th anniversary. The Links chapter provides service to youth, health and human services and the arts. Lula lives in Denver.

Posted Mar. 1, 2013

Last fall at Coors Events Center Leason McCloud (A&S’42) was inducted into the Colorado Athletic Hall of Fame. Leason was a first-team All-American, the third in CU basketball history and sixth in any sport at the time. He was the Buffs’ leading scorer on the 1941-42 team that reached the Final Four and a member of the 1939-40 team that won the NIT and was invited to the first NCAA tournament. Leason resides in Newton, Kan.

Posted Mar. 1, 2013

After graduating, Mary Lou Wilkerson Unterburger (Engl’43) enlisted in the Navy and served for two and a half years instructing Naval air cadets in their first training in instrument flight and radio aids for navigation. She writes she enjoyed reading Clay Evan’s story on the WAVES, “WWII — Women at War,” in the December 2011 issue of the Coloradan. Mary Lou is retired and living in Ann Arbor, Mich.

Posted Dec. 1, 2012

Last fall Gerald Hodge (Art’43) was one of the main speakers at the Johns Hopkins Medical School for its 100th anniversary of the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine. He also gave a half-day workshop in silver point drawing, a technique used by artists during the Renaissance. He did his graduate work at Johns Hopkins from 1946 to 1949. Gerald lives in Ann Arbor, Mich.

Posted Mar. 1, 2012

Professor emeritus of biological chemistry at the University of Michigan Minor “Jud” Coon (Chem’43) was honored by a symposium with lectures by his former students. He was recognized for his research on the enzyme cytochrome P450, which helped establish its biomedical importance in steroid synthesis, chemical carcinogenesis and drug metabolism. He also was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and awarded an honorary medical degree from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. He writes he has fond memories of chemistry professor Gustavson who was an inspiring professor.

Posted Dec. 1, 2011

At age 91, wind energy pioneer Palmer Carlin (ElEngr; MS’52; PhD’55) can be found at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Wind Technology Center in Golden, Colo., three days a week answering questions from the public about renewable energy. While working at CU as an electrical engineering professor, he built an early wind turbine prototype and discovered his calling. He’s been with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ever since. “We’re trying to keep the planet’s temperature down,” Palmer says. “Wind is one way to do that.”

Posted Dec. 1, 2015

For more than 65 years Ruth Law O’Neal (Mus’45) has taught piano, voice and piano pedagogy. She was an adjunct professor for 30 years at CU Denver. She remains an active musician, teaching piano bi-weekly to advanced pianists and music appreciation to about 50 residents of the Vi at Highlands Ranch retirement community. She lives in Littleton, Colo.

Posted Dec. 1, 2011

In March Loy Ledbetter (MechEngr’46) and Peggy Cushman Ledbetter (DistSt’47) celebrated 66 years of marriage. They live in St. Louis, Mo.

Posted Dec. 1, 2014

It’s one thing to walk the halls of CU as a woman today. But 70 years ago, in the wake of World War II, being a woman on a college campus was a whole different story. It’s a story that Timmye Berg Pollard (ArchEngr’46) still likes to tell. She and her late husband, Theodore E. Pollard (ArchEngr’49), who died last fall at age 90, met at CU, when Timmye was often the only woman in her classes. While she was waiting for her husband to graduate, she worked as an engineer and even assisted with the structural design of some of the buildings on campus. In May, Timmye, now 88, and her daughter, Evelyn McLane, visited CU.

Posted Sep. 1, 2014

At the Mortar Board National College Senior Honor Society’s national conference in July Virginia Wheeler Patterson (Jour’46) received the Distinguished Lifetime Membership Award. This annual award is presented to alumni who demonstrate a lifelong devotion to Mortar Board’s ideals of scholarship, leadership and service. After returning from being a guest editor of Mademoiselle in New York, Virginia served as president of the Boulder Valley School board for seven years. She helped create the Pearl Street Mall and found the Downtown Boulder Association.

Posted Mar. 1, 2013

The Sink, Timber Tavern and Greensman’s Drug Store are establishments that remain vividly in Gene W. Miller’s (CivEngr’46) memory when he recalls his CU-Boulder days. Along with living in the dorms, he lived in Vetsville. He fondly recalls professors Warren Raeder, Bill Thoman and Dean Eccles. Married 64 years, Gene retired from the steel industry. Some of his projects included Disneyland’s Matterhorn Mountain and Chicago’s State Street Bascule Bridge. He lives in Houston.

Posted Dec. 1, 2012

Mary Grills Broadhurst (Engl) has written a number of short stories and reminiscences. One of her recent stories was featured in the book World Wars - Memories and Reflections of Boca Grande Families, which was published by the Boca Grande Community Center in Florida. Mary lives in Denver.

Posted Jun. 1, 2017

Only a year after John Egan (Acct ex’47) left CU-Boulder, he moved to Lombard Village, a suburb of Chicago. He still calls the place home 66 years later. And since earlier this year, Lombard residents officially call March 21 “John Egan Day,” in recognition of his more than six decades of loyal service to the town. John, who celebrated his 90th birthday March 16, was also named Lombard Man of the Year in 1967.

Posted Sep. 1, 2014

To honor John Egan (Acct ex’47) for more than 65 years of loyal service to the village of Lombard in Illinois, the village’s board of trustees proclaimed March 21, 2014, “John Egan Day.” John was instrumental in the Jaycees, the Lombard Park District, the Lombard Historical Society and was named Lombard Man of the Year in 1967. He celebrated his 90th birthday on March 16. He writes, “As a grad of the business school in 1947, I thought you might like to hear about the results of your education.” John and his wife moved to Lombard in July 1947 where they raised five children.

Posted Jun. 1, 2014

Every Tuesday former all-conference football player Stan Hendrickson (Econ’47) meets past CU players and coaches for coffee. “It’s the bright spot in my life,” he told the Denver PostBill Kucera (PE’56), who played a decade after Stan, drives him to ensure he gets to every meeting. Stan played for CU from 1941-42 before serving in World War II. While in New Guinea, he received a telegram revealing he was drafted by the Detroit Lions. An injury from the war left him unable to play, so he pursued a business career. He lives in Boulder.

Posted Jun. 1, 2012

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