low water levels at the Glen Canyon DamClassical decision-making frameworks have aided water managers in selecting an optimal water resources plan. These methods are applicable when dealing with simple systems and well-understood uncertainties impacting the system. As water resources systems and models become more complex and the future climatic conditions are poorly known, the classical decision-making frameworks don’t hold up.

Bureau of Reclamation

  • Elliot Alexander, M.S. Student, Reclamation Engineer in Training
  • Principal Investigators: Joe Kasprzyk and Edie Zagona
  • Reclamation: Carly Jerla, Dr. Jim Prairie, Alan Butler

Classical decision-making frameworks have aided water managers in selecting an optimal water resources plan. These methods are applicable when dealing with simple systems and well-understood uncertainties impacting the system. As water resources systems and models become more complex and the future climatic conditions are poorly known, the classical decision-making frameworks don’t hold up. In deeply uncertain conditions, it is more appropriate to strive for multiple robust water resources plans rather than an optimal plan.  The focus of this research is to create an adaptive planning framework that seeks robust operation of the Colorado River Basin utilizing the Colorado River Simulations System (CRSS) RiverWare model.