Mongolia and the American Great Plains: A Study in Archaeological Methodologies

  • Student Recipient: Sebastian Wetherbee, Applied Mathematics
  • Faculty Mentor: Douglas Bamforth
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Archaeology on the North American Great Plains and the East Asian steppe are extremely similar in terms of their environments, and the kinds of archaeological deposits they contain. The goal of this project is to identify methods of geospatial analysis from both geographical subfields of archaeology, given their many similarities, that may be used to improve the methods of their academic counterparts, in order to benefit researchers in both regions. Student will collect data for this project as a volunteer on the Western Mongolia Archaeology Project, headed by archaeologists from Western Kentucky University and the National Museum of Mongolia.

Community-Based Research of the GENESISTER Program: An Anthropological Study of Latinx Youth as Cultural Brokers in Boulder County

  • Student Recipient: Amy Martinez, Anthropology / Communication
  • Faculty Mentor: Kathryn Goldfarb
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objectives of this study are to (a) explore the experiences of bicultural youth in Boulder County and how biculturalism influences youth development, (b) examine how the GENESISTER program designs services for participants intended to maximize their skills as cultural brokers, and (c) provide the organization with suggestions for improvement. As a collaborative project, this study seeks to exemplify the assets of a bicultural population, and also to serve the organization's own desire for information on how to best serve its constituency. This topic is especially relevant today based on current socio-political tensions focused on Latinx populations.

Wandering Disease: A Cultural and Biostatisticial Study of Tuberculosis in Mexican Migrant Worker Communities

  • Student Recipient: Clara Geoghegan, Anthropology
  • Faculty Mentor: Donna Goldstein
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My project investigates the relationship between migrant agricultural workers and health, specifically focusing on high incidence rates of tuberculosis among seasonal farm laborers in the San Luis Valley. I am investigating how power structures and uncertain immigration status may affect an individual's personal health and perceptions of health systems. This investigation is especially relevant in a political climate that focuses heavily on those with uncertain immigration status and deportation. I hope this investigation will bring to light perspectives that are not heard due to fear of deportation, and ultimately help communication between public health workers and my population.

The Art of Dealing with the Gods

  • Student Recipient: Emily Martin, Applied Mathematics
  • Faculty Mentor: Carla Jones
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Offerings are a central feature of a Balinese system of exchange with the invisible world, designed to appease the hungers of spirits in a Hindu worldview. While the spectacular offerings for infrequent ceremonies are made mostly by men, daily supplication and appeasement of the local spirits requires a constant supply of small offerings made by women. This project asks about the role of women’s labor in routine ritual life. I hope that I am able to shed new light on the importance and value of domestic labor through a religious perspective.

How Immigration and Technology are Changing the Cultural and National Identity of Sweden

  • Student Recipient: Kaitlin May, Applied Mathematics
  • Faculty Mentor: Carole McGranahan
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: In modern Sweden two elements are identifiable as instigators of social change: immigration and technology. But, how and to what extent are these elements changing Sweden. What is the reaction among Swedes of different backgrounds? I propose to travel to Sweden to research how national and cultural identity is changing in response to an increasingly technology oriented and diverse society. This project will be an anthropological field study that examines Swedish identity from local perspectives. The insights gained from this research will benefit the greater study and perception of changing cultural identities in response to modern global social issues.

How Immigration and Technology are Changing the Cultural and National Identity of Sweden

  • Student Recipient: Kaitlin May, Applied Mathematics
  • Faculty Mentor: Carole McGranahan
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: In modern Sweden two elements are identifiable as instigators of social change: immigration and technology. But, how and to what extent are these elements changing Sweden. What is the reaction among Swedes of different backgrounds? After completing summer research on how national and cultural identity in Sweden is changing in response to an increasingly technology oriented and diverse society, I will write an honors thesis that responds to the collected information. The insights gained from the conclusions of this research will benefit the greater study and perception of changing cultural identities in response to modern global social issues.

Classroom Intervention: Investigating Mindfulness and Students' Relationships with Smartphones and Social Media

  • Student Recipient: Autumn Stevens, Anthropology / Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
  • Faculty Mentor: Annie Bruns
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Our ability to control our attention is decreasing in the face of constant exposure to hypernormal stimuli and technological distraction and becoming more important considering the ever-increasing commodification of human attention. The primary research question is to determine whether or not classroom time dedicated to mindfulness meditation practice is valuable to students, as measured by student self-report data, measures of perceived stress, and students’ media and technology usage and attitudes. Both academic institutions (like CU) and the public stand to benefit from this study, as mindfulness meditation can be applied across various aspects of education and human attention.

Biomimetic Design Solutions for Indoor Air Quality

  • Student Recipient: Danielle Brodrick, Architecture
  • Faculty Mentor: Seth Wilberding
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The intent of this project is to research the processes that inform the growing field of biomimetic design in the built environment professions (e.g. architecture, industrial design, interior design, etc.) In the US alone, many people are routinely exposed at home and in the workplace to up to 80,000 untested chemicals present in common materials, which suggests serious implications for human health. Aligned with several recent design initiatives to improve indoor occupant health, this project will advance the environmental design research professions through investigating case studies of design projects that employ the concept of biomimicry or mimicking natural biophysical processes.

Assessing an East African NGO in the Context of International and National Development Goals and Plans

  • Student Recipient: Gabrielle Edwards, Chemical and Biological Engineering
  • Faculty Mentor: Angela Thieman-Dino
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I aim to understand the following: 1) the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), 2) Uganda's National Development Plan II and Comprehensive National Development Planning Framework (through which Uganda implements its SDGs), 3) how the mission, strategies and programs of the Global Livingston Institute (GLI--a U.S. based non-government organization operating in East Africa) align with Uganda’s SDG priorities and plans. I intend my findings to be useful not only to GLI but also to other East-African based development projects, specifically the collaboration between the Engineering Leadership Program and CU Law School’s Energy and Environment Security Program.

Disaster Response and Environmental Justice in Post Earthquake Coastal Ecuador

  • Student Recipient: Zoe Welz, Engineering Plus / Geology
  • Faculty Mentor: Abbie Liel
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: On April 16th, 2016 an earthquake with a moment magnitude of 7.8 occurred in Coastal Ecuador. This May I I will be living in Bahía de Caráquez, Ecuador for two months performing disaster relief engineering and geological work while also pursuing sociological research. My research will focus on the effects of the Earthquake on the community's infrastructure and environmental rights. Ecuador was the first country to ever recognize the rights of nature in their constitution. I will be researching how this affects the rebuilding process and if humanitarian, social, and environmental rights are being met in the relief process.

Energy Poverty in Brazil: Can Microgrid Legislation solve this problem?

  • Student Recipient: Paula Pulido, Civil Engineering
  • Faculty Mentor: Angela Thieman Dino
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The purpose of this project is to gather on-the-ground research on the effectiveness of micro-grids as a means to alleviate energy poverty in urban or rural communities in Brazil. This research will be used to craft an evidence-based policy solution and legislation involving identified government allies, NGOs and stakeholders in communities affected by energy poverty. Brazil’s growing Microgrid industry is crucial to electrifying its rural areas in a sustainable and green way as the country moves into becoming Latin America’s largest clean energy power.

Adaptive reuse of Historic Boulder

  • Student Recipient: Brooke Pisani, Environmental Design
  • Faculty Mentor: Paul Chinowsky
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objective of my project addresses environmental, societal, and economic benefits of adaptive reuse. By taking an unused site and making it usable, my project could engage the community, bring in new revenue, and make optimal use of Earth's habitable land. The city of Boulder could benefit from various new infrastructure; however, building new structures is problematic due to Boulder’s protected open space and our efforts to conserve nature. By taking some of Boulder’s historic gems and making them into some of our needed infrastructures, we can avoid new construction and demolition of Earth’s natural resources for space and materials.

A Comparative Analysis: Water Policies of Indigenous Communities in Bolivia and the United States of America

  • Student Recipient: Jade Foley, Environmental Engineering
  • Faculty Mentor: JoAnn Silverstein
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This project will be Phase One of Three in a comparative analysis of water policies in Bolivia and the United States of America with an emphasis on the relationships between federal and local water policies and indigenous communities. The focus regions will be Bolivia’s La Paz, Coroico, and Cochabamba. Water sanitation systems installed by volunteer-based groups typically fail because cultural considerations and policies are not appropriately considered in the long-term Through this research, I hope to improve the longevity and success of water sanitation projects in developing areas and to add new perspectives to our own ideas of sustainability.

Studying the impacts of climate shocks on social outcomes: A case study using Institutional archival documents in Colonial India during the 18th and 19th centuries.

  • Student Recipient: Shi Chen, Environmental Studies / Geography
  • Faculty Mentor: Atreyee Bhattacharya
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Changing climate and increasing human pressures are negatively impacting human-environment interactions, particularly in semi-arid areas ( SARS) of the global south. The proposed project is part of a collaborative study that applies an interdisciplinary approach, combining human archival records and paleoclimate data, to study the role of climate shocks on societal outcomes in SARs of Maharashtra, a state in western India that is witnessing conflicts over water resources. I will be working in the Maharashtra State Archives in Mumbai to collect data related to climate disasters in the state from archived institutional documents from the 18th and 19th centuries.

UN Human Rights Council and South American Indigenous Communities' Rights to Natural Resources

  • Student Recipient: Annika Cobb, Environmental Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Cassandra Brooks
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This research project will be a case study on the United Nations Council of Human Rights, specifically the South America Regional Office based in Santiago, Chile, which works in nine countries and organizations within them to defend human rights. This case study will answer the following research questions: How is the South American office defending indigenous communities’ access to, and governance of, natural resources? This research will analyze the obstacles faced by both indigenous communities and international organizations with securing rights to use natural resources and will evaluate the effectiveness of a top-down approach to safeguarding environmental human rights.

Communicating Sustainability: Science Museums and Green Architecture

  • Student Recipient: Katelyn Sector, Environmental Design
  • Faculty Mentor: Georgia Lindsay
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The goal of the mentor’s project is to better understand how science museums communicate about their LEED architecture, and whether they use the building to educate visitors about sustainability or not. As more buildings strive for LEED certification, this project will outline how the sustainability values inherent in green buildings are communicated to the general public. Of three main case study sites, the student will focus on the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, which she will visit for photographs and site analysis. In addition, the student will conduct content analysis of Websites, PR materials, and other educational materials.

Single Parenthood as a Marginalized Immigrant in the US

  • Student Recipient: Melany Anderson Sibanda Anderson Sibanda, Ethnic Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Joanne Belknap
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My study examines marginalized immigrant single parents and the struggles they face while trying to acclimate to the US with their families under the pressures of racial macro- and micro- aggressions. Physical, mental and economic wellness of single parent immigrants and their children are analysis in relation to their immigration and residence in the US. There are multiple studies that have been conducted on single parenting and immigrant parents but not specifically immigrant single parents. During a time of rising tensions between US government and society with immigration, I believe the timing of my researching these challenges proves appropriate .

Latinx Adults and Children with Physical Disabilities’ Access to and Availability of Healthcare and Educational Resources

  • Student Recipient: Betsabet Samarripa, Ethnic Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Joanne Belknap
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I'm standing from the point of being part of this group. Hypothesis- A.Type of physical disability is related to a person with a physical disability’s (PWAPD’s) experiences with healthcare. B. Type of physical disability is related to a person with a physical disability’s (PWAPD’s) experiences with educational systems. Questions- 1.How are Latinx people with a physical disability treated in the healthcare system? 2.How are Latinx people with a physical disability treated in the educational system? 3.Why are Latinx people with a physical disability treated so poorly? 4.What are better ways we can better these resources?

Climate and Conflict: How climate shocks effect hindu-muslim violence in India

  • Student Recipient: Michael DeSimone, International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Atreyee Bhattacharya
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: My project focuses on the relationship between climate and conflict in India. India has been rife with problems since partition in 1947, and these problems are exacerbated by climate shocks. Agriculture is a huge source of income, and if there is too much (or too little) rain, that negatively affects crop yields, incomes, and increases the chance of violence. I’m using the Varshney-Wilkinson database, which chronicles all documented riots in India from 1950-1995. I plan on cross-referencing this with a database of dams in India, to see if dam-fed areas show increasing or decreasing levels of religious violence in India.

Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation: A Case Study of Sri Lankan Households and Communities

  • Student Recipient: Alejandra Pedraza, Environmental Studies / Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
  • Faculty Mentor: Amanda Carrico
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Household and community surveys were conducted in Sri Lanka over a five-year period. The household survey collected information about demographics, agricultural production, perceptions of environmental change, and agricultural innovation. The community survey assessed access to irrigation infrastructure, farmer training programs, and agricultural support within the community. For my project, I am analyzing and interpreting the data collected to identify the factors that facilitate or constrain adaptive responses to climate change among farmers. I will create informative visuals that will be used by community leaders in Sri Lanka to prepare farmers for the upcoming challenges that climate change will present.

Adapting Cities to Ecological Limits by Reducing Waste and Increasing Food Security

  • Student Recipient: Trevor Stanley, Environmental Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Adam Reed
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Specifically, I want to study what inefficiencies exist in urban food systems and how new technologies and waste can streams be utilized to their full potential to improve communities, food security, and access. I will do this by analyzing the energy, water, material, and cost flux associated with three types of urban food systems: Mushroom farming, Insect Farming, and Hdro/Aquaponic farming. This project is relevant as it is seeking solutions to reduce organic waste from creating methane/CO2 emissions (from landfills and transportation respectively) while simultaneously tackling issues of food access and security. This is relevant in the context climate change.

The Struggle for Environmental Justice on Orchid Island and the Future Implications of Taiwan's Nuclear Energy Dependency

  • Student Recipient: Jessica Vaughn, Environmental Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Adam Reed
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This proposal is the second part of my larger project. The first grant I submitted will be used to conduct ethnographic research at Orchid Island during Summer 2017 and this grant will be used to develop an extensive literature review based on my findings from both the summer and academic term.

Documenting the Police Tasing of Youth and the Racial Implications

  • Student Recipient: Emma Roche, Ethnic Studies / Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Joanne Belknap
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objective of this project is to investigate the lack of regulation and rules surrounding police use of Tasers on children and how this is specifically detrimental to the non-white community. There is currently little to no research or information on police use of Tasers. In the United State law enforcement climate, non-white people are imprisoned, killed, and harmed by police at alarming rates. The goal of this project is to highlight these injustices and show the need for better regulation and reshaping of Taser rules and training within the police force in order to better protect non-white communities.

The language barriers and the psychological and social effects on the Latin American immigrant labor force in the United States

  • Student Recipient: Jonathan Delgado, Spanish Language and Literature / Sociology / Secondary Education
  • Faculty Mentor: Joanne Belknap
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The main purpose of this research is to depict a more accurate picture of how the undocumented labor force in the United States mingles with the language barriers in placed and with the current political animosity harbor against the Latino undocumented community. I will provide an insight as to how undocumented workers interact with authority figures, such as police officers and employers. Due to the rise of political discontent towards the undocumented community, it is important for our society to understand how the current social factors embedded against the undocumented community impact the current workers’ experience and awareness about oneself.

Messengers: Hip-Hop's Reflection

  • Student Recipient: Connor Grantz, Ethnic Studies / Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Joanne Belknap
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The Hip-Hop Movement is an incredibly powerful and relevant movement, both in the U.S. and globally, with a currently wide and diverse hip-hop generation. Hip-hop messages and themes have changed over time and often address a specific event (e.g., #BlackLivesMatter, the elections of Obama and Trump, etc.). My honors thesis proposes to examine hip-hop's messages in a cultural, political, and social context. This project is relevant because hip-hop is a cultural juggernaut in the United States and globally, and serves as both a direct reflection of society while it likely influences the millions of individuals who listen to hip-hop.

Colorado Domestic Violence Fatality Review Committee Data Analysis

  • Student Recipient: Jordan Spinelli, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Joanne Belknap
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Many domestic violence fatality review committees (DVFRCs) were forming across the U.S. since the early 1990s to collect data on domestic violence cases where there was a murder, attempted murder, or suicide. In the summer of 2017, the Colorado Attorney General’s Office spearheaded a successful bill to require that Denver’s DVFRC expand and go statewide. My mentor has been the researcher on Denver’s DVFRC since its inception, and they are newly appointed as the researcher for this expanded statewide program under the CO Attorney General’s Office and requires help entering and analyzing the data.

An Ethnobiological Approach to Fire Management in Yosemite National Park; Indigenous fire practices

  • Student Recipient: Micheli Oliver, Geography
  • Faculty Mentor: Joe Bryan
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: In Yosemite valley indigenous peoples were removed from their lands due to pressure from European colonists. Their absence has contributed to the fuel load crisis in the valley. The Miwok and Paiute tribes were major contributors to fire setting around and in Yosemite, their practices are known from the outside, but never looked at from an indigenous perspective. I plan to get an ethnobiological view of indigenous fire practices by conducting interviews, as well as listening to oral histories. I then plan to work with indigenous peoples to create a different approach to fire management in Yosemite national park.

Exploring Climate Vulnerabilities in Female-Headed Southern African Households

  • Student Recipient: Andrea Clement, Geography
  • Faculty Mentor: Joel Hartter
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The proposed project will explore potential inequalities in female and male headed households in Namibia, Botswana, and Zambia. Groupings will be analyzed using data collected on cash income, natural-resource reliance, education, and environmental variables. This individual project is embedded within a larger study in which affiliates directly surveyed households in community conservation areas. Intended purposes include determining food security, wildlife conflict, and natural resource usage. The project considers if female-headed households have greater reliance on natural resources. The project stands to benefit these households by exposing potential inequality in vulnerability in an era of climate change and increased conservation measures.

Higher Education Initiatives in Authoritarian Regimes

  • Student Recipient: Ian Hogg, History
  • Faculty Mentor: Sarah Sokhey
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The purpose of this project is to study investment in higher education by authoritarian regimes. Background research shows that non-democratic regimes with large public sectors invest more resources per student than democratic ones due to the desire on the part of those governments to grant material benefits to the next generation of elites. Authoritarian governments attempt to do this while not creating the conditions for opposition. Specifically, Kazakhstan served as a case study. My mentor’s project will add to current knowledge about how public policy, particularly with regards to higher education, is influenced by natural resources and regime structure.

A Cartographic Assessment of Stakeholder Alliances Surrounding the Bears Ears National Monument

  • Student Recipient: Tai Koester, Geography
  • Faculty Mentor: Joe Bryan
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The designation of Bears Ears National Monument was made possible through complex intertribal and nontribal coalitions. On paper, it appears as though all members of these coalitions are on board to protect the same place. But in practice, how Bears Ears is conceived varies within these coalitions. Available maps of the Bears Ears region produced by various stakeholders can potentially expose these differences. This study aims to answer the following questions: How are the interests of various Bears Ears stakeholders manifested in available regional mapping data and can these maps offer a barometer for how durable existing alliances are?

The Economic and Geographic Divide in Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley

  • Student Recipient: Andrea Guadagnini-Zaharko, Geography
  • Faculty Mentor: Jennifer Fluri
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Income inequality in America is accurately represented in Colorado’s Roaring Fork Valley (RFV). At the eastern end of the valley is Aspen. Due to increasing property value, most of Aspen’s workforce lives outside of the city. Though affordable housing exists in Aspen, it is not enough to accommodate the city’s workforce. My research for this project will examine the effects of this economic divide on communities in the RFV as they pertain to affordable housing and commuting. Gaining insight into this problem will benefit the understanding of regional income disparity and its effects on affordable housing and commuting.

Examining the social and communication aspects associated with TORFF and other multihazard weather events

  • Student Recipient: Joy Weinberg, Information Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Leysia Palen
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Imagine hearing warning sirens, alerting of a tornado. Heading to a basement for safety seems like the appropriate reaction. However, what if a flash flood is also threatening and compromising the safety of the basement? Previous studies have looked into various risk factors and outcomes resulting from when tornadoes and flash flooding happen concurrently. This understudied and devastating weather phenomenon referred to as TORFF causes an array of confusion for all parties affected. To better understand how people are impacted by multihazard weather events such as TORFF(s), we will examine various social and communication dynamics.

Science Communication

  • Student Recipient: Brooke Holman, Geology
  • Faculty Mentor: Leilani Arthurs
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This project aims to study specific semantics in the communication of science with focus on climate change. Specifically, the objectives of this project are to: (a) generate a list of terms commonly used to explain scientific concepts and processes to the public; (b) contrast their semantics (i.e., meanings) from both the perspective of the discipline-specific scientific field using the term and the perspective of the average layperson’s use of the term; and (c) develop a tip sheet and/or training activities for scientists in training and professional scientists. Scientists, the public, and the environment stand to benefit most from the findings.

The Second Edition of Shaping the Developed World

  • Student Recipient: Ciara Coughlan, International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Andy Baker
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Mentor is writing the second edition of Shaping the Developing World, a textbook for upper division courses on Global Development. The text needs updating with new statistics and new research. Benefits of textbooks are the undergraduate community (worldwide) that will read it as well as professors who have adopted it. Text has already sold about 3,500 units.

Human Behavior Project

  • Student Recipient: Tate Teague, Finance / Accounting
  • Faculty Mentor: Kai Larsen
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The Human Behavior Project (HBP) aims to integrate the behavioral sciences through natural language processing algorithms. The project is predicated on what we term the Reverse Progress Problem of the Behavioral Sciences, and accomplished through the production of the Internomological Network Search Engine. The reverse progress problem is in essence the collective buildup of duplicated information brought about by the use of repeated variable measures that are the same and only differ by name. Our Internomological Network Search Engine stands to offer a solution to researches across all disciplines.

Identifying neural pathways underlying conditioned suppression

  • Student Recipient: Mona Khaledi, Neuroscience
  • Faculty Mentor: Michael Saddoris
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: During stressful situations, cues within the environment, such as sounds, often become associated with the stressor. As a result, hearing these sounds again can evoke a stress response, even in the absence of the original stressor. These cues are often random and unavoidable in everyday life and can therefore be sources of debilitating anxiety. Exposure to stress-associated cues are powerful triggers for sufferers of PTSD and make it difficult to accomplish other goal-directed tasks. Understanding the conflict between attending to these stress-associated cues and on-going motivated behaviors is crucial to characterizing and treating stress-related disorders.

American Politics Research Lab: Recurring Legislation and Presidential Statements

  • Student Recipient: David Merkel, Economics / International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Edward Adler
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The Presidential Statements Project aims to collect and categorize every public statement by past and present United States Presidents. By scraping and parsing data housed by the UC Santa Barbra American Presidency Project’s website, we hope to illustrate the political and topical priorities of various presidents over time. With the data, the team hopes to understand what determines presidential talking points and how statements change policy in the United States. The field of American Political Science will benefit from the research as the data has not yet been comprehensively collected nor utilized to better understand presidential policy.

Police Expenditures and Mayoral Elections

  • Student Recipient: Seth Rose, Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Vanessa Baird
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Through examining municipal budget expenditures during mayoral election cycles, this research attempts to explore and understand the dynamic of influence that police expenditures have on voting patterns and the extent to which mayors alter the composition of municipal budgets in favor of police expenditures as a methods of increasing their chances of reelection. Through such study, political scientists and constituents alike may better understand municipal budget cycles and the tangible influence that police presence has on voters and reelection of city mayors. The hypothesis of these influential trends and expenditures, highlights a unique facet of/potential for corruption in local governments.

Discrepancies in Voter Turnout: American Primary Election Types

  • Student Recipient: Sophia Jean, Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Kenneth Bickers
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The purpose of the project is to determine whether different types of American State primary elections (ex. Blanket, Closed, Semi-Open) cause differing levels of turnout. The analysis of this will occur at both the aggregate level (the entire state in question) and at the individual level (determining which, if any, psychological factors are relevant).

The Impact of Protest on Economic Development

  • Student Recipient: Quinton Frahm, International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Carew Boulding
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Broadly the project studies the impact of protest on economic growth. And in order to better understand this link, this project has multiple objectives, from an in-depth study of protest demands, and how they vary across countries and time. The primary focus of the student will be on Latin America and the Middle East. The student will aid the mentor with the analysis of protest events to create a comprehensive protest database. This project is growing increasingly relevant to the United States because in recent weeks, our country has seen some of the largest protests in United States history.

Independent Candidates in Mexico

  • Student Recipient: Antonio Huizar, Political Science / International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Carew Boulding
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objective of this project is to develop a typology of the newly introduced figure of independent candidates in Mexico. Research has been limited due to the recent timing of the electoral reform that permitted independents (2014) as well as the small number of independents that have run and an even smaller number that have won. This project is relevant in that it will contribute to this developing literature while identifying deficiencies in independent candidates as typified by current legislation. Mexican citizens, academia, and candidates themselves stand to benefit from the development of such a classification.

Independent Candidacies in Mexico: A Typology and Study of Outcomes

  • Student Recipient: Antonio Huizar, Political Science / International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Carew Boulding
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objective is to expand my typology of independent candidates (IC) running for executive office in Mexico. I will broaden this classification to IC’s for legislative seats (local, national congress). I will also investigate what IC’s types win and why. Most literature agrees IC legislation is restrictive, without specifying how this affects electoral access and victory. I hypothesize this electoral mechanism is most accessible to businessmen and the upper class, instead of regular citizens for whom the 2014 reform was intended. By contributing to developing literature on IC electoral access and typologies, Mexican voters, academia, and prospective candidates would benefit.

Explaining Gender Differences in Political Support around the World

  • Student Recipient: Perrine Monnet, International Affairs / Anthropology
  • Faculty Mentor: Carew Boulding
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The objective of my mentor’s project is to understand why women exhibit equal or greater levels of support for government than men. This is important because no country in the world serves women as well as men, yet women are quite supportive of government institutions and regimes. My main role in the project is to help construct an original dataset of feminist political parties. Overall, this project serves to enhance our understanding of gender inequality around the world by examining when women hold governments accountable for advancing their rights and well-being.

Neoliberalism and Higher Education

  • Student Recipient: Emily Anderson, Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Michaele Ferguson
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: For decades, scholars have critiqued the role of neoliberal policy in the realm of higher education. However, with the recent inauguration of Donald Trump and, subsequently, with the confirmation of Devos, the future of higher education in the United States remains even more precarious. In light of this new administration, I will examine the impact of neoliberal ideology/economic policy on higher education, emphasizing the consequences the university faces as a democratic public sphere. I will observe the ways in which the education policy of the administration will fit into the neoliberal model, and the ways in which it will not.

Taming the Shrew: The Rise of Neoliberal Feminism in America

  • Student Recipient: Mallory Hale, International Affairs / Women and Gender Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Michaele Ferguson
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: This project demonstrates the neoliberalization of feminism since the 1970s through genealogical analysis and case studies. It critiques the neoliberal version of feminism that has emerged by analyzing how it has “stunted feminists’ capacity to offer meaningful analysis, a basis for collective political action, and a compelling alternative to the status quo”. It goes beyond this critique by offering a radical, political path for feminism. Scholars stand to benefit from this analysis, which brings together previously unconnected critiques of feminism and neoliberalism, and activists looking for a new, thought-provoking path can benefit as well from this transformation of feminism.

Rejecting Individualized Discourse: A Fuller Diagnosis for Addressing Sexual Violence

  • Student Recipient: Mallory Hale, Women and Gender Studies / International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Michaele Ferguson
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My project critically analyzes the rhetoric of International Criminal Court (ICC) statements and United Nations (UN) resolutions regarding sexual violence as they are influential components of international legal discourse. My hypothesis is that this discourse individualizes sexual violence and hides long standing hierarchical structures, which are responsible for determining who is considered perpetrators and victims. My project will critique this individualizing tendency in order to address power hierarchies, such as colonialism. Scholars will benefit as it will contribute to the larger endeavor of conceptualizing sexual violence by furthering the diagnosis on why attempts to address sexual violence have been inadequate.

From McCarthyism to the International Women's Year: The Role of Cold War Politics in Shaping American Gender Rhetoric

  • Student Recipient: Helen Stritzel, International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Michaele Ferguson
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This project seeks to understand the timing and cause of a gender rhetoric shift in regards to the Cold War. During the 1950's and 1960's, the USSR was portrayed as negatively feminine, while the United States epitomized masculinity and strong gender roles. However, by the 2000's, perceptions of a patriarchal Russia and a equal opportunity America were firmly in place. This project is relevant because it’s important to understand what factors influence gender rhetoric so advocacy groups can address issues better, especially since similar political forces may be at work today.

DACA Research for Bipartisan Immigration Reform

  • Student Recipient: Emma Levy, Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: John Griffin
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: It is well documented that obtaining a quality degree of higher education motivates individuals to pursue citizenship in the United States. However, there exists a substantial gap between the number of undocumented students who graduate high school and those who continue to obtain a bachelor’s degree. I will conduct community-based research that provides evidence of specific obstacles undocumented individuals face in their pursuit of higher education. This research will provide insight into what resources are necessary to increase the presence of undocumented students at university, so that strategies can be developed to produce more ethical outcomes in university demographics.

The Conditions Under Which the ECJ Alternatively Centralizes or Decentralizes power in the European Union

  • Student Recipient: Shane Smith, Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Joseph Jupille
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The European Court of Justice (ECJ) is “the pivot of the balance of federalism” in the European Union (EU), adjudicating jurisdictional disputes between the EU and its member states. While historically the ECJ has been seen as advancing integration by centralizing power, its role has become increasingly nuanced in the last several decades. What explains the conditions under which the ECJ alternatively decentralizes or decentralizes power in the European Union? The project aims to execute empirical tests capable of answering this question. Answering this question will advance understandings of European integration and judicial behavior in federal systems.

European Court of Justice preference for Supranationalism or Intergovernmentalism

  • Student Recipient: Colin Tweedy, Economics / International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Joseph Jupille
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The mentor wishes to determine whether the European Court of Justice is fundamentally more interested in promoting supranationalism or intergovernmentalism in the context of the EU. There remains an ongoing debate about whether the EU is controlled by its member state constituents or whether it is instead its own independent and influential force. The mentor's research will help to add data to this relevant debate, supporting one claim and opposing the other, by addressing how the EU's central judicial body acts: whether it acts according to supranational interests or according to the principal interests of the member states.

Human Behavior Project

  • Student Recipient: Evan Blaskowski, Neuroscience
  • Faculty Mentor: Kai Larsen
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The Human Behavior Project (HBP) aims to integrate the behavioral sciences through natural language processing algorithms. The project is predicated on what we term the "Reverse Progress Problem of the Behavioral Sciences," and is accomplished through the production of the Internomological Network Search Engine. The reverse progress problem is, in essence, the collective buildup of duplicated information brought about by the use of repeated variable measures that are the same and only differ by name. Our Internomological Network Search Engine stands to offer a solution to researchers throughout the behavioral sciences.

Unraveling the Turban through American Sikh and Canadian Sikh experiences

  • Student Recipient: Serene Singh, Political Science / Journalism
  • Faculty Mentor: Srinivas Parinandi
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Religious discrimination is an urgent problem in our country. More specifically, the Sikh population has experienced a drastic increase in hate crimes since 9/11. This research will focus on how individuals perceive the "turban" in America and Canada and determine if this can explain the rates of hate crimes against Sikhs in both countries. The difference in the Canadian Sikh experience versus the American Sikh experience can potentially help explain the broader issue of religious intolerance. Beyond Sikhs, this topic can serve to better the experiences of other religious groups, ultimately leading to a more inclusive and tolerant country.

Measuring the Effectiveness of Electric Car Incentives

  • Student Recipient: Andrew Thompson, Environmental Studies / Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Srinivas Parinandi
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The specific purpose of my project is to determine a suitable way to measure the effectiveness of environmental focused government incentives. The objective is primarily to determine if environmentally based incentive programs are an effective measure of refocusing net negative consumer behaviors. In a time where most climate change is anthropocentric, my research would help understand a better way that public policy can rectify environmentally degrading behaviors or products used by consumers. I would also benefit from this project, the research would further strengthen my academic career in preparation for a senior thesis, internships, or a career.

Understanding how Geography Influences the Diffusion of Policies in the American States

  • Student Recipient: Andrew Thompson, Political Science / Environmental Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Srinivas Parinandi
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The purpose of the project is to answer the following questions: Are individual legislators susceptible to geographic influence in the same way as collective legislatures, and does geography interact with individual legislator-specific variables to drive policy diffusion? As assistantship implies, "mentor" seems to benefit the most. However, I believe that the knowledge and experience gained by helping "mentor" would serve as a benefit that I cannot receive from any of the classes at CU. Working hands on with a professor on research would prepare me to complete my own research and best prepare me for graduate school or a career.

Measuring the Impact of State Electric Vehicle Incentives

  • Student Recipient: Andrew Thompson, Environmental Studies / Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Srinivas Parinandi
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The specific purpose of my project is determining if environmental policies, electric vehicle incentives, have an impact on consumer decisions and distinguishing which incentives have the biggest impact . The objective is primarily to determine if state electric vehicle incentive programs are an effective measure of refocusing environmentally degrading consumer behaviors. In a time where most climate change is likely due to anthropocentric burning of fossil fuels. My research would help understand and design public policy to rectify environmentally degrading behaviors/products. I would also benefit from this project; the research would strengthen my academic career in completing a senior thesis.

Behavioral and Neuronal basis of prescription opioid addiction

  • Student Recipient: Janet Lee, Neuroscience
  • Faculty Mentor: David Root
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The misuse of and addiction to opioids is a serious national crisis right now. Unlike other addictions, our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying opioid addiction is poorly understood. I propose to identify which specific types of VTA neurons are necessary for the self-administration of the most abused prescription opioid, oxycodone. The identification of these neurons will inform the development of new cellular targets against opioid addiction. This is a continuation of work, completed the behavioral validation, found sex differences, and currently have the preliminary data for neural validation, in the Wild Lab facility at the University.

The effect of resource deficiency in UN peacekeeping on civilian protection in civil wars

  • Student Recipient: Morgan Genelin, Accounting / Finance
  • Faculty Mentor: Megan Shannon
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: This project investigates the determinants and effects of financial and personnel shortfalls in United Nations peacekeeping operations. In particular, why do countries offer insufficient monetary and personnel support for missions, and how does this affect the procurement of peace and civilian protection in countries experiencing civil conflict? Quantitative and qualitative data on peacekeeping’s financial contributions and subsequent mission budgets will be collected to produce analysis for a book project on this theme. The project speaks to the important issue of resource deficiency in international security efforts, a prominent theme both for international practitioners as well as international relations scholars.

Understanding Informal Political Conversations: Social Networks and Everyday Deliberation

  • Student Recipient: Aaron Lombardi, Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Anand Sokhey
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The ultimate objective of Professor Sokhey's project is to gain a better understanding of how individuals discuss politics in an informal setting throughout their everyday lives. This research is being conducted through the analysis of audio data from 45 registered voters who agreed to carry a portable recording device and record audio from their lives for a minimum of 20 hours. Understanding how individuals discuss politics in a casual environment is an essential step in improving public discourse.

Higher Education Initiatives in Authoritarian Regimes

  • Student Recipient: Cameron Love, Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Sarah Sokhey
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Recent research has shown authoritarian states with high public expenditures tend to spend considerably more on education per student than comparable democracies. My mentor's project seeks to answer the question of "why this occurs?" By looking into higher education initiatives adopted by authoritarian regimes around the world and comparing them to higher education initiatives in democratic regimes, we can examine what is different about the two and why those differences might exist. Through understanding the differences, we can begin to understand what motivates public spending in undemocratic regimes

The Effects of Brexit on Northern Ireland and Ireland

  • Student Recipient: Corrinne McKenna, International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Sarah Sokhey
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objectives of this project are to examine the complexities of statehood in areas around the world that are considered de facto states or are a part of larger states while maintaining a significant measure of autonomy within their own borders. This project will specifically examine Northern Ireland against the backdrop of the regionally unpopular Brexit Negotiations.

Higher Education in Authoritarian Regimes

  • Student Recipient: Kevin Ordonez, Political Science / International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Sarah Sokhey
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The purpose of the project is to determine how authoritarian regimes invest in higher education programs within their country. There is already data that shows that there is a large amount of spending going on, and the next step is to see find out what specific education they target and why. Democratic and liberal countries tend to see authoritarian regimes as uninterested in public welfare, so investigating why education is surprisingly prioritized can help us understand what can motivate these regimes to invest in public goods. Understanding motivations will help the international community evaluate the actions of authoritarian regimes.

Democratic Backsliding in Europe

  • Student Recipient: Emily Schweitzberger, International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Sarah Sokhey
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: This project seeks to explain the causes of democratic backsliding including the rise of far right political parties in the 2000s in Europe. Our work is relevant given recent developments. Countries like Turkey and Hungary have been highlighted by the European community as examples of countries that appear to be moving in a more authoritarian direction, but the right-wing Law and Justice Party in Poland and the Brexit referendum in the UK have also raise concerns. We hope this research will be beneficial to scholars of the region and policymakers in understanding and reacting to recent political developments.

Enacting Environmental Policy: A Bear of a Task

  • Student Recipient: Torri Gladem, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology / Environmental Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Steven Vanderheiden
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: 1.My proposal’s purpose is to understand the underlying antagonism between Colorado’s wildlife policies and its actual wildlife management. My project aims to address this dissonance by analyzing biological research conducted by Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) as well as their policy changes over the years, and conducting interviews with those in the agency. I also plan to specifically research the commissioners of CPW, placing an emphasis on their backgrounds and possible sources of funding. This project’s relevance relates to the growth of the modern anti-environmental movement and aims to provide a thorough explanation regarding the possibility of misguided policies.

Examining Intergroup Perceptions Towards Political Behavior: Collective Guilt and Guilt Reminders

  • Student Recipient: Jacob Oliver, Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Jennifer Wolak
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I am answering the call to fill two gaps of knowledge with exist currently in the literature of political psychology; how do members within identifiable groups perceive others who are motivated by guilt to act politically, and what, if possible, is the most prosocial method of reminding groups of guilt? Answering these questions is of supreme importance, for the interaction between guilt and political behavior which manifests at the University of Colorado Boulder and outside of the institution is poorly understood; leading to unintended consequences at the hands of those in charge. The health of intergroup relations is at stake.

Rise of Right Wing Populism

  • Student Recipient: Samuel Foredyce, Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Gregory Young
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The project stands to help understand the trends occurring across the UK and United States in their Brexit and American Presidential Election which led to the outcomes. By analyzing state level aggregate data mixed with individual voter behavior we can hope to get a glimpse into the mind of the new age voters. This would go to benefit both current politicians as well as political analysts as we could potentially understand new trends in the 21st Century.

An Intersectional Analysis of Voting Rights in Practice

  • Student Recipient: Kelsey Grant, Political Science / Philosophy
  • Faculty Mentor: Celeste Montoya
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The objective of my mentor’s project is to determine what the intersectional components of contemporary voter suppression policies/practices are, with an emphasis on the intersectionality of race and gender. This project aims to develop the existing narrative on voting rights that’s centered on the early 1900’s suffrage movement. However, the intersectionality of race and gender don’t fit into this narrative. Thus, this project aims to incorporate an often under-articulated narrative about minority women and voter suppression in the contemporary electoral system. Standing to benefit from this project include political strategists, electoral officials, and those expanding research on voting rights.

Examining the correlation between being active in traditional Native American/Indian American traditions and beliefs and self reports of symptoms of anxiety/depression

  • Student Recipient: Ogechi Hippolyte, Neuroscience / Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Irene Blair
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My curiosity to asking this question came from my own experience as someone from a different culture feeling like an outsider in a new environment when moving to Boulder for my education. This has led me to asking if there’s a correlation amongst members of the Native American/Indian American community in the level of their current involvement in traditional beliefs/practices and symptoms of anxiety of depression. My final project will be exhibited at Undergraduate Research day, this usually takes place at the Glenn Miller Ballroom towards the end of the spring semester.

Childhood Adversity and Adult Health Outcomes in American Indian/Alaska Native Populations

  • Student Recipient: Caitlin Roe, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Irene Blair
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The project’s main goal is to understand the relationship between childhood adversity and adult health outcomes in populations frequently exposed to extreme prejudice, specifically American Indians and Alaska Native (AI/AN). This project is part of a larger study exploring how experiences of discrimination affect the health of AI/AN. My project hypothesizes that early childhood adversity is associated with poorer health outcomes, and that this relationship is mediated by depression and anxiety. Poor health habits may be induced or exacerbated by mental illness. Understanding health dynamics in populations vulnerable to prejudice will help to provide more effective, tailored, health interventions.

Special Interests and Anthropomorphism

  • Student Recipient: Emily Valdez, Psychology / Pre-Health
  • Faculty Mentor: R. McKell Carter Carston
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This study will survey the frequency and style of anthropomorphic insertion that occurs between human features (face and other body parts) and objects of special interest (a common focus of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) individuals' perceptual systems). Report of special interests will be examined relative to intensity, complexity, consumption of time and conversation, dynamism and anthropomorphic insertion. The aim is to investigate the frequency and manner in which objects of intense special interest have persisting social qualities, and the relationship this anthropomorphic insertion has on overall social function across populations. Both ASD and neruotypical populations may benefit.

Adaptive Vocabulary Tutor for Toddlers

  • Student Recipient: McKenna Rogers, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
  • Faculty Mentor: Eliana Colunga
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: I will be working on a project that tests toddler’s word-learning skills through a computer application. The purpose is to create an effective way to integrate technology into a toddler’s early learning experiences to further their understanding, use, and expression of their growing vocabularies. After development and testing in the lab, the app is planned to be tested in Head Start programs. This project stands to benefit families and their children, particularly children who are at risk for delays in vocabulary acquisition, as they go through their many language and learning milestones.

The Effect of Contrast on White Male Faces in the Weapon Identification Task

  • Student Recipient: Lindsay Tuttle, Psychology / Sociology
  • Faculty Mentor: Joshua Correll
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My mentor has been studying racial bias using the Weapon Identification Task (WIT). I am hoping to expand on his research in order to learn more about how task results might reflect factors other than mental stereotypes. The question I am exploring is whether prior findings from the Weapon Identification Task can be mimicked via manipulations of salience rather than race. If race is not what has driven previous results from the WIT, it is possible that it is not our internal association of race and threat level is not the only mechanism that drives reaction time bias.

Memory Recall from Online Sources

  • Student Recipient: Kyler Miller, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Tim Curran
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I will be studying information processing, storage, and recall of information from computer sources compared to paper sources. In general the lab I am currently working in uses the EEG to study memory processes, and I helped with a previous experiment suggesting that our memory for digitally accessible information (e.g., on the internet) is remembered worse than inaccessible information because we mentally off-load digitally accessible information. The EEG lab has not been able to study this idea yet, and so I plan on combining both parts into this experiment. This project will be a part of my Senior/Honors Thesis.

Memory Recall from Online Sources

  • Student Recipient: Kyler Miller, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Tim Curran
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I will be studying information processing, storage, and recall of information from computer sources compared to paper sources. In general the lab I am currently working in uses the EEG to study memory processes, and I helped with a previous experiment suggesting that our memory for digitally accessible information (e.g., on the internet) is remembered worse than inaccessible information because we mentally off-load digitally accessible information. The EEG lab has not been able to study this idea yet, and so I plan on combining both parts into this experiment. This project will be a part of my Senior/Honors Thesis.

Identifying Strategies of Political Persuasion for Changing American Political Tone

  • Student Recipient: Jake Reagan, Political Science / Spanish
  • Faculty Mentor: Michaele Ferguson
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The purpose of my research is to identify how major political actors in modern American history have changed the political tone of our country, and what techniques they employed to bring about that change. This question rests at the confluence of three particular fields of study within political science: political persuasion, public opinion, and rhetoric. This research is relevant given our current national political tone which many studies have found to be rife with political tension and acrimony. This research would benefit political actors, academics, and the American public at-large.

Associations between Depressive Symptoms and Social Media Engagement in First-Year College Students

  • Student Recipient: Rachel Karasik, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: June Gruber
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This project will examine associations between depressive symptoms and social media engagement and network size using a large survey-based approach in college Freshmen addressing two aims. Aim 1: Examining associations between depressive symptoms and greater social media use across several common platforms, regardless of online social network size. Aim 2: Examining whether social media mediates relationship between depression severity and decreased social support/ belonging. My project is part of a larger project in my mentor’s laboratory examining emotion-related challenges and level of adjustment for first-year college students. Research will contribute to better understandings of mental health difficulties on college campuses.

Measuring Cognitive Function, Reaction Time, and Processing Speed of Student-Athletes Individual versus Team Sports

  • Student Recipient: Elinor Barsh, Neuroscience / Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Theresa Hernandez
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The proposed project will examine reaction time and processing speed in student-athletes using a neuropsychological assessment, ANAM4. Engaging in team sports involves being constantly aware of where team/non-team members are in space, while individual sports rely on knowing where the individual, his/her-self is in space. I hypothesize that student-athletes engaging in team sports (football, basketball, volleyball) will show faster reaction times and processing speed than those involved in individual sports (golf, track, skiing). This project falls within a larger study taking place in the lab/research team, which is identifying the main indicators of student-athlete health and well-being.

An Intervention to Promote Resilience in Trauma-Exposed Youth and Families

  • Student Recipient: Savannah Santana, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Karl Hill
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Grounded in resilience research, Emotion Theory, social development, and adult-child relationships, this intervention aims to promote resilience in trauma-exposed youth. With this project, I will participate in a clinical research trial that evaluates the efficacy of the intervention, while focusing on the role of cultural factors for risk and resilience in Latino families. Since youth exposed to trauma are at-risk for numerous health and behavior outcomes, we must evaluate the intervention under a culturally adaptive lens since all interventions do not look identical or yield the same outcomes in different contexts.

Individual Differences in Sentence Processing

  • Student Recipient: Manasa Ponnapalli, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology / Neuroscience
  • Faculty Mentor: Albert Kim
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The specific objectives are to observe through EEG and behavioral tasks how individual subjects process both semantic and syntactic differences in sentences. This is important because it contributes to the general understanding of neural linguistics and which mechanisms allow these processes to occur.

Collaboration Is Key: Teamwork in Medicine

  • Student Recipient: Lindsay Jackson, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Christina Lacerenza
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The central objective is to address the following practical problem: Errors in healthcare occur as a result of poor team dynamics. Teamwork training offers a solution to this issue, however, many existing programs are voluntary, which limits their effectiveness (Hughes et al., 2016). This study aims to discover who is currently interested in these programs, as well as how we can increase interest moving forward. This issue is both novel and substantial, as strong collaboration in medicine has been shown to positively impact physician effectiveness, patient care outcomes, and the workplace environment as a whole (Weaver, Dy, & Rosen, 2014).

Identifying Social Correlates of Problematic Alcohol Use in College Students

  • Student Recipient: Preston Godkin, Neuroscience / Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Chris Loersch
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: College students exhibit greater problem drinking than their non-college peers (Slutske, 2005) and alcohol use in college is associated with problems ranging from truancy to arrests (O’Hare, 1990). Thus, it is important to understand the predictors of alcohol use among college students. Since students are highly susceptible to social influence (Borsari & Carey, 2001), it is especially important to examine the role of social factors in drinking. I propose to examine how expectations, norms, university identification and need to belong relate to harm reduction strategies, alcohol-related problems and alcohol use. These findings will inform intervention strategies by identifying “at-risk” students.

The Effect of a Musical Intervention on Interpersonal and Intergroup Attitudes

  • Student Recipient: Sarah Munoz, Psychology / Sociology
  • Faculty Mentor: Chris Loersch
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This project expands on previous research conducted at CU involving musical reactivity and social connections. I plan to expand on this research by replicating two previous studies demonstrating that musical interventions decreased negative attitudes toward a stranger; I will explore the intervention’s effectiveness for improving attitudes toward a stranger (of a racial out-group). Another purpose of the study is to see if the music intervention, involving a specific individual, will affect implicit evaluation of the racial category to which the individual belongs. This project attempts to identify whether the musical intervention will interact with racial group to decrease negative attitudes.

Personality Correlates of Repetitive Negative Thinking

  • Student Recipient: Will Deselms, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Akira Miyake
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Repetitive negative thinking (RNT), defined as “repetitive thinking about one or more negative topics that is experienced as difficult to control,” has become an important topic in clinical psychology, but research is needed to examine personality precursors that might explain how susceptible an individual is to RNT. One objective of this research is to attempt to replicate previous findings using two measures of RNT. More importantly, this research will also examine the extent to which RNT is related to personality precursors that have yet to be studied in this context.

Do adolescents moderate their risk-taking depending on information about their group's attitudes about the risk?

  • Student Recipient: Cleo Andersen-Green, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Yuko Munakata
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Adolescents tend to show less self-control in the presence of peers but it is unclear why. This study will manipulate children’s, adolescents’ and young adults’ beliefs about peer and adult norms regarding self-control in the contexts of risk-taking and cognitive control, to test whether social values and norms influence self-control, and whether these effects operate through peer influence and are heightened in adolescence. This research has the potential to provide new insights regarding social influences on the development of self-control, and could have implications for interventions to improve self-control in adolescents.

Partner Behavior, Motivational Systems, and Marital Adjustment: An Integrative Model

  • Student Recipient: Bailey Starritt, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Mark Whisman
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The proposed research seeks to examine whether individual differences in two motivational systems that underlie behavior and affect – the behavioral activation system (BAS) and behavioral inhibition system (BIS) – moderate associations between positive and negative partner behavior and marital adjustment. I hypothesize that positive behavior will be more associated with marital adjustment for people higher in BAS, whereas negative behavior will be more associated with adjustment for people higher in BIS. There are no published studies examining the proposed integrative model, which will be conducted as part of a larger study on marital adjustment, individual differences, and psychopathology.

Developmental Antecedents and Interpersonal Correlates of Excessive Reassurance Seeking

  • Student Recipient: Bailey Starritt, Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Mark Whisman
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Excessive reassurance seeking (ERS) – the tendency to seek reassurance that one is loveable despite others providing such reassurance – is linked to depression. I seek to study developmental, interpersonal, and intimate relationship correlates of ERS. Specifically, building on theories that dysfunctional interpersonal styles mediate associations between interparental conflict and psychopathology, I will evaluate associations between interparental conflict and ERS. Furthermore, I seek to identify characteristic interpersonal profiles associated with ERS and evaluate whether rejection found in other contexts extends to rejection from romantic partners. Results may have implications for preventing and treating ERS and, in turn, preventing psychopathology.

Interpreting Social Movements and Impacts on Sociodemographic Groups

  • Student Recipient: Lauren Adler, English / Sociology
  • Faculty Mentor: Amanda Stevenson
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: This project investigates how intersectional framings are transmitted from activists to social movement elites. While intersectional theory has been studied by women of color since Angela Davis' 1982 Women, Race, and Class, mainstream feminists have only recently begun employing the theory's rhetoric. Recently, intersectional rhetoric has become so powerful and widespread that a recent article in "Science Advances" argues that intersectionality was the key driver of the Women's Marches upon Trump's inauguration (Fischer, Dow, and Ray, 2017). With that said, this project asks why this rhetoric was so recently adopted and argues that Texas prefigured the nationwide change.

The Effects of Tourism And Subsequent Government Regulations on Local Culture in Brazil

  • Student Recipient: Julia Arthur, International Affairs / Spanish and Portuguese
  • Faculty Mentor: Tania Martuscelli
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objective of this project is to study the relationship between state governance and local response to an increase in tourism in the state of Maranhão in Brazil. As the government attempts to limit tourism in some places and disregard it in others, this project aims to study those communities directly affected by this decision-making. This project fits into a larger socio-environmental study of many communities in Maranhão and how tourism impacts their communities, mainly in an environmental manner, since they live inside or in the outskirts of the National Park of Lençois Maranhenses.

Training Module Development for the PlayO2I Method

  • Student Recipient: Wynne Royer, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
  • Faculty Mentor: Angela Bonino
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Collecting reliable behavioral data from toddlers and preschoolers is challenging. As a result, our understanding of human auditory development for these age groups has significant gaps. My mentor has developed a new method for collecting behavioral data for 2- to 4-year-old children. With this method, the child is trained to perform a play-based response when the auditory stimulus is heard. The experimenter then monitors the child’s behavior during two observation windows to determine which window contained the signal. The purpose of this project will be to develop training modules that can be used to train new experimenters.

Examining links between bipolar disorder risk and emotion dysregulation in freshman during the transition to college

  • Student Recipient: Elizabeth Hoelscher, Psychology Sociology
  • Faculty Mentor: June Gruber
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I will examine a well-validated measure of bipolar (mania) risk with emotion-relevant impulsivity in college students. This project will examine whether mania risk will be associated with greater self-reported emotion relevant-impulsivity (Hypothesis 1) and whether the link between mania risk and academic performance is mediated by emotion-relevant impulsivity (Hypothesis 2). My project will serve as my honors thesis and is embedded in a project overseen by my PI to investigate divergent trajectories of adjustment in and maladjustment to college to inform policies to benefit college student mental health. This will contribute to better understanding the epidemic of mental health difficulties.

Morphological Awareness in Bilingual Populations

  • Student Recipient: Laura Peterson, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences / Linguistics / Spanish Language and Literature
  • Faculty Mentor: Pui Fong Kan
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The purpose of the study is to examine how teaching and practicing morphological rules in English (e.g., -ful in joyful) impacts understanding of these concepts in Spanish for typically-developing bilingual children. Approximately 9.5% of students in the US are classified as English Language Learners (NCES, 2018), while only 6% of speech therapy providers are bilingual (ASHA, 2018). Supporting bilingual language learners requires understanding which language skills are transferable, where instruction in one language leads to understanding in the other. This study will consider morphological awareness, the ability to recognize the meaningful components of words, and its potential for cross-linguistic transfer.

Guerreras y Puentes: Legacies of Chicana Feminism and Contemporary Latina/x Activism

  • Student Recipient: Mariana Galvez Seminario, Sociology / Women and Gender Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Celeste Montoya
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Social justice movements are usually studied on a single-axis framework (the civil rights movement, the women’s movement, the LGBT movement), but the efforts of those at the intersections of multiple identities is oftentimes overlooked. Latina/x activists have played an important role in past and contemporary social justice movements, so this research aims to look into how Latina/x activist’s intersectional identities (Latinas often find themselves at the intersection of multiple marginalities) influence how they do their activism. We will be looking into contemporary organizations with Latina/x leadership, and hopefully this research will highlight and explore their contributions.

Depression and Hearing Loss

  • Student Recipient: Lindsey Palumbo, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
  • Faculty Mentor: Anu Sharma
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Studies show links between hearing loss and cognitive decline. I plan on assessing data collected from our lab on over 70 subjects analyzing the scores on different cognitive and depression questionnaires to examine whether the relationship between hearing loss and cognition is mediated by social isolation. I will examine the relationships in subjects whose hearing loss has been treated with hearing aids. I predict that hearing aid use will result in improvement in cognitive function and decrease depression. Results from this study will have important implications for hearing loss and may result in changes in how we treat hearing loss.

A Comparison of Large Versus Small Grain Instruction for English-Speaking Adults Learning to Read Hangul

  • Student Recipient: Emily Heneman, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
  • Faculty Mentor: Christine Brennan
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Bilingualism is a growing global norm and a requirement for many aspects of business and politics, motivating the need for research focused on second language (L2) learning. This study will compare learning outcomes of two different instruction methods (i.e., emphasis on letters versus whole words) given to English-speaking adults learning to read Hangul (Korean). Hangul is irregular (e.g., irregular spelling patterns), like English, but differs in letter placement. This research will elucidate our understanding of second language learning and learning outcomes given different forms of instruction on different types of orthographies/writing systems. Results can lead to improved foreign instruction methods.

Social-Emotional Development Trends in Children with Hearing Loss

  • Student Recipient: Marlenne Montanez, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences / Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Kathryn Arehart
  • Grant Information: 2019 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Research has shown that children with hearing loss experience greater dysfunction than typically hearing children in areas such as behavior, stress, social support, and self esteem. These issues in social-emotional development negatively impact a child’s interaction skills, academic abilities, and interpersonal connections. This research will explore if children who are deaf or hard of hearing demonstrate a higher degree of social-emotional issues as early as 1 to 3 years of age. This project will also examine which specific social-emotional skills are most at risk for delay in children with hearing loss.

Exploring Phonological Awareness Skill as a Function of Socioeconomic Status

  • Student Recipient: Samantha Bartolo, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences / Sociology
  • Faculty Mentor: Christine Brennan
  • Grant Information: 2019-20 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Phonological awareness (PA), a component of successful reading skill, involves matching speech sounds (phonemes) to letters (graphemes). This study will explore PA in children of varying socioeconomic status (SES) via a novel PA task with real words and nonwords. After collection of data, the second phase of the project aims to analyze and interpret results. SES is linked to various educational outcomes; therefore, understanding the impact of SES on PA will further inform the relationship between SES and literacy. Results will enlighten practices in the fields of education and speech-language pathology.

The Violence Against Women's Act: An Intersectional Policy Analysis

  • Student Recipient: MaryKate Wallace, Women and Gender Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Celeste Montoya
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: This project conducts an intersectional analysis of the legislation, discourse, and implementation of the Violence Against Women Act from its original passage in 1994, through contentious renewals, to future prospects. Stage 1 of the project will focus on conducting a thorough legislative history that includes critical frame analysis of legislative content and political discourse. Stage 2 will focus on the implementation of the policy federally and locally. Particular emphasis is placed on the implications of the policy for different communities. Diverse communities, survivors of violence, and lawmakers all stand to benefit from analysis of existing legislation and its implementation.