Profit Maximization for the Venue Owner: A comparison between the Americas

  • Student Recipient: Michael OHearne, Operations Management / Marketing
  • Faculty Mentor: Stephanie Garriga-Snaider
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: To find the most profitable way to host live music this project will compare the density of people attending music events in proportion to the event specifications and marketing tactics in cities across the Americas. This will provide valuable information to promoters and venue owners worldwide. Successful venues will also stimulate the local economy by allowing other industries (alcohol, tobacco, club, and restaurant industry) to profit simultaneously. Additionally, taxes are incurred from every piece of this equation, and profit maximization for a venue would in turn increase taxes payable. Benefits come to both the venue owner and the local government.

Green Garments by Garmai

  • Student Recipient: Garmai Matthew, Chinese
  • Faculty Mentor: Tracy Jennings
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The goal is to make a tangible counter argument to the "fast fashion" industry's unwillingness to transition to sustainable, eco-friendly approaches to creating garments. Fast fashion is a term used by fashion retailers meaning that designs move from catwalk quickly to capture current fashion trends at Fashion Week in the spring and autumn seasons every year. The rapid pace of production of this industry is a leading cause of pollution in the world, second to oil and gas. The goal is create sustainable garment prototypes to prove that its possible to create fashionable garments without excessive waste and causing pollution.

Human Behavior Project

  • Student Recipient: Mallory Britz, Neuroscience
  • Faculty Mentor: Kai Larsen
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The Human Behavior Project (HBP) aims to integrate the behavioral sciences through natural language processing algorithms. The project is predicated on what we term the Reverse Progress Problem of the Behavioral Sciences, and accomplished through the production of the Internomological Network Search Engine. The reverse progress problem is in essence the collective buildup of duplicated information brought about by the use of repeated variable measures that are the same and only differ by name. Our Internomological Network Search Engine stands to offer a solution to researches across all disciplines.

Human Behavior Project

  • Student Recipient: Holden Southard, Mathematics
  • Faculty Mentor: Kai Larsen
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The Human Behavior Project (HBP) aims to integrate the behavioral sciences through natural language processing algorithms. The project is predicated on what we term the Reverse Progress Problem of the Behavioral Sciences, and accomplished through the production of the Internomological Network Search Engine. The reverse progress problem is in essence the collective buildup of duplicated information brought about by the use of repeated variable measures that are the same and only differ by name. Our Internomological Network Search Engine stands to offer a solution to researches across all disciplines.

Human Behavior Project

  • Student Recipient: Chelsea Yun, Integrative Physiology
  • Faculty Mentor: Kai Larsen
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The Human Behavior Project (HBP) aims to integrate the behavioral sciences through natural language processing algorithms. The project is predicated on what we term the Reverse Progress Problem of the Behavioral Sciences, and accomplished through the production of the Internomological Network Search Engine. The reverse progress problem is in essence the collective buildup of duplicated information brought about by the use of repeated variable measures that are the same and only differ by name. Our Internomological Network Search Engine stands to offer a solution to research across all disciplines.

Techno-Economic Analysis of Production and Market Adoption of Applied Film Retrofitting Product (AIR FILMs)

  • Student Recipient: Trevor Stanley, Environmental Studies / Economics
  • Faculty Mentor: Ivan Smalyukh
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My primary research objective is to evaluate the potential market demand as well as barriers and catalysts for the advanced insulating aerogel film (AIR FILMs) being developed by the soft matter physics lab I am working with. This research will be used to inform production and diffusion models, marketing strategies, and industry partner needs. The product could potentially be the cheapest on the market and significantly reduce energy usage in buildings without need for sophisticated energy renovations