The Unknown Influence: Balzac, Picasso, and the Minotaur

  • Student Recipient: Mary Sachs, Art History / French
  • Faculty Mentor: Albert Alhadeff
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objective of my thesis is to explore the subject of the minotaur featured in Pablo Picasso’s Vollard Suite. The series is a collection of 100 etchings created between 1930—1937. During this period, the commissioner of the suite, Ambroise Vollard, also enlisted Picasso to illustrate Honoré de Balzac’s novel, The Unknown Masterpiece, in 1931. I will be arguing that another Balzac text, The Physiology of Marriage, may have influenced Picasso’s conception of the minotaur. If imagined in connection with Picasso, the text’s satirical take on the mythological creature could shed new light on scholarly interpretations of the suite.

Vision and Performance in Rogier van der Weyden's 'Deposition' (1438)

  • Student Recipient: Victoria Richthofen, Art History
  • Faculty Mentor: Kirk Ambrose
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I am looking to explore the nuances of 'The Descent from the Cross' by Rogier van der Weyden (1438). When this image is examined closely, you can see that all of the female figures have their eyes closed; van der Weyden portrays them to some extent as 'blind' (noting especially the figure of Mary in the front, dramatically fainting). When examined in the context of the broader period, we see that vision and light are extremely important, interrelated concepts that are both spiritually symbolic and artistic. I want to explore how van der Weyden uses these concepts in his masterwork.

Sculptural Topiary Garden Development

  • Student Recipient: Christopher Madaras, Studio Arts
  • Faculty Mentor: Scott Chamberlin
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The objective of the mentor’s project is to further develop and maintain a sculptural Topiary garden on the estate of Casa de Juste in northern Portugal. The student’s curiosity in the project stems from an interest in Topiary in an Abstract Sculpture context (particularly in Ceramic Art), which is a primary concern of the mentor’s Artwork. The student’s inspiration includes Levens Hall, a highly prominent Topiary garden in England, whose Head Gardener, Chris Crowder, is a collaborator with the project. The final project is the site-specific, public art installation of the garden on the estate of Casa de Juste.

Creativity in the World at Large

  • Student Recipient: Leon Wan, BFA, Art Practices
  • Faculty Mentor: George Rivera
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I’m an undergraduate animator interested in exploring how privilege and opportunity affect an individual’s ability to pursue the creative arts as a living. This project shows that individuals can pursue their own path via supportive and skills learned at schools. As a first-generation U.S. citizen, it was difficult to gain approval from my family as an artist. Their cultural values are focused on economic health – animation was never seen as a practical career option. Through my animation, I will show the complexities of biculturalism through the arts and the viability of pursuing independent artistic production.

Mobile Interdisciplinary Networking Exhibition

  • Student Recipient: Haley Hyde, BFA, Art Practices
  • Faculty Mentor: Richard Saxton
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Where on campus do students have the opportunity to collaborate and share their creative and scholarly achievements? The Mobile Interdisciplinary Networking Exhibition, or M.I.N.E. will soon host exhibitions of cross-disciplinary projects, performances, research and academia giving any motivated student or student organization a unique platform. This mobile museum will preeminently provide a space for valuable dialogue between students and scholars from all eight academic schools.

Mobile Interdisciplinary Networking Exhibition

  • Student Recipient: Matthew Vivirito, BFA, Art Practices / Art History
  • Faculty Mentor: Richard Saxton
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Where on campus do students have the opportunity to collaborate and share their creative and scholarly achievements? The Mobile Interdisciplinary Networking Exhibition, or M.I.N.E. will soon host exhibitions of cross-disciplinary projects, performances, research and academia giving any motivated student or student organization a unique platform. This mobile museum will preeminently provide a space for valuable dialogue between students and scholars from all eight academic schools.

Sci-Fi Dreams: An Exploration of Identity Inspired by Science Fiction and Surrealism

  • Student Recipient: Arpi Grigorian, Physics / Art Practices / Mathematics
  • Faculty Mentor: Melanie Walker
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: In the photographs, I explore gender, gender identity, the body, life and death through 1930's surrealist aesthetics. The photographs will be in black and white. They present a series of interacting characters with lampshades instead of heads, dressed in 1930's attire. I will also add wires and circuits into the photographs, bringing in science fiction to contrast the past with the future. By abstracting the body with these motifs, I create space for new metaphors for life, death, and gender. The final works will be exhibited in April of 2019 on the lower level floor of the Visual Arts Complex.

Dirty Laundry

  • Student Recipient: Linda Williams, BFA, Art Practices / Art History
  • Faculty Mentor: Melanie Walker
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Dirty Laundry is a yearlong project that focuses on the voiceless traumas of life such as abuse, rape, death, and abortion. It will result in is series of ten to twelve sculptures and be displayed used for my BFA Studio Art Honors Thesis as well as the BFA Show in the fall of 2017 at the CU Art Museum. Each sculpture will be a collaborative effort between select individuals and myself that representation their traumatic events that they have been silent about but want to find their visual voice.

Legitimacy and Confucianism in Contemporary People's Republic of China

  • Student Recipient: MaKenna Zoglmann, Chinese / Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Katherine Alexander
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The purpose of the project is to explore the use of Confucian propaganda by the Communist Party in order to retain legitimacy amidst an identity crisis in Chinese society. As China begins to encroach on the United States' hegemony, the stability of the regime is a topic of great concern to both the U.S. government and the world at large, as they are inextricably linked with the world economy. Understanding the nature of the shifting attitudes in both society and government in China will be helpful in identifying strategies in which to deal with the powerful country.

Responsive Wearable Technology for Dance

  • Student Recipient: Emily Daub, Technology, Arts and Media
  • Faculty Mentor: Ben Shapiro
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My objective is to explore how new wearable technologies can enhance dance, creating new connections between movement, light, and sound through innovative costume engineering. I will integrate programmable electronics with fabric to create responsive clothing and then choreograph and perform a routine illustrating different types of connections between people. Movements of individual bodies, as well as the physical arrangements of different performers’ bodies in relation to each other will affect the visual appearance of the wearables. In addition to designing and performing, I will document my process so that other dancers and technologists can learn from it.

Fragmenting Ymir: Immersive Backyard Theater

  • Student Recipient: Selena Wellington, Music, Composition / Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Betsey Biggs
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The purpose of this project is to document an original performance on April 20, 2018. The performance itself is an interactive, immersive performance space in a garden, with videographers capturing different paths through the garden to be edited and produced for my website and portfolio. The work will require 30+ performers, ranging from musicians to dancers to actors. This work blurs the line between performance art and installation art, performer and audience, creating a unique challenge in its digital documentation. The work itself will be a larger exploration of the Norse myth of Ymir.

The Evolution of Diverse Characters in Rick Riordan's Writing

  • Student Recipient: Sydney Chinowsky, English
  • Faculty Mentor: Tiffany Beechy
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My objective is to examine how Rick Riordan has evolved as a children's author over the past decade specifically relating to his inclusion and treatment of diverse characters. As Riordan is one of today's most popular children's novelists, I want to acknowledge the importance of having diverse characters in mainstream literature.

Palmyra and Britain: Intercultural Influences Between East and West and The Body Motility of Queer Women

  • Student Recipient: Brianna Cooke, English
  • Faculty Mentor: Jillian Heydt-Stevenson
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: I will assist my mentor with their ongoing book project, “Palmyra and Britain: Intercultural Influences Between East and West.” This research, focusing on women travelers of the 18th- and 19th- century, overlaps with my motivation to explore gender performance and queer expression during this era. Consequently, I will construct a project proposal for graduate school on this subject, having crafted the thesis with this same mentor before fall semester begins. I will enter the field of academic research and writing, helping my mentor develop their book while using their guidance to create my own project.

Post-Secular Theory in Contemporary Literature and Culture

  • Student Recipient: Damian Borovsky, English / Philosophy
  • Faculty Mentor: Karim Mattar
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This research aims to progress our understanding in critical theory to include a system of post-secularism, or the return towards faith from secularism in contemporary society. This research will attempt to understand why exactly secularism has failed on the whole, and the difficulties that come with its attempted preservation in a rapidly globalizing world. I wish to examine two critical pieces to the post-secular puzzle: first, how secularism has failed and why secularism and the scientific revolution were not fully secular from the start; and second, to perhaps explore a theory of ontic structural realism to support this idea.

Honors Thesis: The Subalternization of Islamic Women in Western and Eastern Societies

  • Student Recipient: Allegra Upton, English
  • Faculty Mentor: Karim Mattar
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I plan to write an Honors Senior Thesis within the C.U. English Department that assesses how women face “subalternization” within Western and Middle Eastern societies, using analyses of (1) the idea of gender in the Middle East, (2) the self-perceptions of Muslim women, and (3) the identifications of female-experienced realities (repression, interaction) vis-à-vis those perceptions within and outside of Western culture. I hope to discover the motives, trends, and potential solutions to the Othering in the U.S., contribute to gender studies on Islamic women, and offer further insight into the subalternaity of women in Western and Middle Eastern societies.

The Overlap Between Art Districts and Historic Districts and their Impact on User Experience in Trinidad, Colorado and in Pueblo, Colorado

  • Student Recipient: Winter Roybal, Environmental Design
  • Faculty Mentor: Emily Greenwood
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Both Pueblo, CO and Trinidad, CO have overlapping historic and art districts, and this research will directly compare the relationships that each have experienced between their historic and art districts in order to further a collaboration between the two and find the best methods in balancing art with history. The research will also examine how the overlap of art and historic districts impacts the user experience of the district, for example if they feel a strong sense of character and what that character might be.

Western Identity and the Aspen Art Museum

  • Student Recipient: Claire Derr, Environmental Design
  • Faculty Mentor: Georgia Lindsay
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The project seeks to understand the complexity in ideas, opinions and the design choices associated with the Aspen Art Museum. As a research team, we have been evaluating these design choices in relationship to Western Identity to bring forward the nuances of how the building fits into the town. We are evaluating the thoughts of city officials, residents and opinions from Global and Local scales and will draw conclusions, make an argument, document our findings and submit to journals. These tasks will be completed for publication in the summer of 2017.

The Importance of Code-Switching Among Professional African American Women

  • Student Recipient: Christel Benjamin, Ethnic Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Joanne Belknap
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The specific objective of my project is to study professional African American women's use of code-switching. Although code-switching and professional African American women have been studied, an extensive search of existing research with my advisor indicates no studies on code-switching among professional African American women. The proposed study will be used to identify the degree to which professional African American women use code-switching, how and when it is used, and what the participants view as the benefits and costs to using code-switching. The importance of this project is advancing both the research on code-switching and on professional African American women.

Exploring Haiti's Nineteenth-Century Archive

  • Student Recipient: Willow Schroeder, French
  • Faculty Mentor: Kieran Murphy
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: My mentor is working on a new book, Science after the Haitian Revolution, which explores the legacy of the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804) in the modern conception and representation of scientific knowledge. As the first postcolonial black nation, Haiti brings a different perspective to the epistemological shift characterizing the Age of Revolution. Through a close examination of Haiti’s nineteenth-century archive, the book shows how Haiti’s self-emancipated slaves and their descendants have been keenly aware of the inherent conflicts in French revolutionary ideals, and have often exposed or attempted to solve these problems by tackling their scientific foundations.

Russian Operas Based on Gogol

  • Student Recipient: Anna Knapp, Musicology
  • Faculty Mentor: Artemi Romanov
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My objective is to research Russian operas based on texts by Nikolai Gogol, specifically The Nose by Shostakovich, Sorochintsi Fair by Mussorgsky, and Deal Souls by Shchedrin, in order to analyze the intentions and methods used in translating Gogol’s texts for the stage. I am particularly interested in how Gogol’s themes of fragmented identity and illusion of social rank are manifested both musically and dramatically in the operas under consideration. This research will be incorporated into my senior thesis, to be written Fall 2017

Visualizing the 1920 Census in Louisville, CO.

  • Student Recipient: Conner Sinjem, Psychology / History
  • Faculty Mentor: Vilja Hulden
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Colorado - in particular Colorado’s mining towns - were major recipients of immigrants in the early 20th century, before the Emergency Quota Act of 1921 and the Immigration Act of 1924 severely limited immigration (particularly immigration from Southern and Eastern Europe). This project will examine the 1920 census to better understand the shape of immigration to Colorado on the eve of restriction – where did people come from, what they did for a living, where did they live? The project uses Louisville as a case study, and explores the questions using data visualizations based on data from the 1920 census.

Faith in the Experience of Faith's Absence: An Examination of Faith's Paradox in the Works of Georges Bernanos and Robert Bresson

  • Student Recipient: Jessee Kilgore, Humanities
  • Faculty Mentor: David Ferris
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This research examines a paradox about faith that emerges in the 20th century: faith can be found in the experience of faith’s absence. This paradox is found in Georges Bernanos’ novel "Journal d’un curé de campagne" and translated into Robert Bresson’s film of the same name. I will investigate, first, how this paradox relates to parameters of faith set forth as beliefs in these works and, second, how inconsistencies in the novel’s account of this paradox are brought out through its translation into film. The examination of this paradox figures prominently in my honors thesis project.

Metaphorical Language and Memory

  • Student Recipient: Jayne Williamson-Lee, Linguistics / Psychology
  • Faculty Mentor: Bhuvana Narasimhan
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This Honors Thesis project examines how using spatial metaphors for time influences our emotions about past events. Previous research demonstrates that spatiotemporal metaphors like “spring has arrived” influence people’s emotions about future events. My study extends this work to investigating how emotions about past events are influenced by different spatiotemporal metaphors. The study has theoretical relevance as it contributes to the literature on the relationship between language, cognition and emotion. Investigating how metaphorical language can influence the emotional valence of past memories may direct an approach to selecting valence-sensitive memories for patients with PTSD, depression and other mental health issues.

Piano Quintet Composition

  • Student Recipient: Mitchell Spencer, Applied Mathematics
  • Faculty Mentor: Carter Pann
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My primary aim for this project is to compose a full-length work for piano quintet (piano and string quartet). I hope to explore the existing repertoire for the medium and learn about the dynamics of how the instruments can be scored together, in an effort to further understand various composing styles and techniques when writing chamber music. I am very curious to understand the process of how composers complete entire works out of initial melodic ideas. The final piece would be performed and recorded by CU Boulder musicians in Grusin Music Hall near the end of the 2018-2019 academic year.

Long-form Performance Event in Atlas Black Box

  • Student Recipient: Aidan Cook, Music, Composition
  • Faculty Mentor: Michael Theodore
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: During my last two years at CU I have been engaged in an independent study of the ancient and classical musics of Japan, specifically the music of the Shakuhachi, the bamboo flute which for much of history was confined to religious settings in Zen monasteries. I began this study with the goal of synthesizing this incredibly unique musical tradition into my own compositional voice, and after extensive preparation, am ready to produce an extremely large scale musical composition for Shakuhachi and string quartet, which I intend to present in the Atlas Black Box early Fall of 2017.

The Unpublished Musical Manuscripts from 1920's CU Boulder College of Music

  • Student Recipient: Abigail Bernat, Music, Education and Trumpet Performance
  • Faculty Mentor: Thomas Riis
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: The purpose of this project is to assist my mentor collecting data and transcribing unpublished musical manuscripts in the University of Colorado Boulder archives and special collections, specifically to enable Colorado students and faculty recreate an original musical show composed by CU professors, and performed by students in the 1930s. This project is part of my mentor’s larger objective—to create a 50+ page history of the College of Music since its designation as a “college” in 1920. He aims for publication in time for the centennial celebrations planned for 2020, activities to which the whole CU/Boulder community will be invited.

Black Death, Mortality Salience, and Their Effect on the Literary and Compositional Output of Guillaume de Machaut

  • Student Recipient: Zachariah Smith, Music Education
  • Faculty Mentor: Jeremy Smith
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This project focuses on French composer and poet Guillaume de Machaut (1300-1377). As one of few composers whose life bridged the outbreak and aftermath of the Black Death, he provides an opportunity to examine the way the plague affected musical composition. According to Terror Management Theory, a rise in mortality salience would be expressed through systems affirming the value and meaning of life. This increase of mortality salience should be displayed in Machaut’s works as he “manages” this terror. This research will further our understanding of Machaut’s works and help musicians be mindful about how death and disease affects composition.

Double Bass Quartet

  • Student Recipient: Eleanor Dunlap, Music Education
  • Faculty Mentor: Paul Erhard
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objective of this project is to expand the student's performance capacity through a double bass quartet performance at the International Society of Basses convention in Ithaca, New York June 5-10, 2017. The guiding principles of this work are: musicality, ensemble communication, and personal technical advancement.

Mountain Streams- Premiere at International Society for Bassists Convention

  • Student Recipient: Danielle Griner, Music, Performance and Composition
  • Faculty Mentor: Paul Erhard
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I am a bass player as well as a composer, so I decided that I could use my knowledge of both areas to create a piece for the instrument that had merit for both the audience and the performers. My main guiding principal for this work was to make a piece that stepped outside of the scope of normal bass literature, and explore the instruments melodic capabilities. There will be a performance of this work in Boulder and at the International Society for Bassists Convention.

ISB Bass Quartet Presentation

  • Student Recipient: Selyne Tibbetts-Pagan, Music, Performance
  • Faculty Mentor: Paul Erhard
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Since its renaissance nearly 300 years ago, bass has been mostly abandoned in the realms of solo and chamber music. However, that is beginning to change due to a renewed focus on the instrument. Bass is being welcomed back to several different mediums of performance and it is thanks to the dedicated consortium of bassists all over the world. The objective that CU’s bass quartets would like to achieve is contributing to this showcase by performing recent chamber works at the ISB 2017 June convention in Ithaca, NY, including a new piece written for double bass duet.

Aspen Music Festival

  • Student Recipient: William Bond, Music, Performance
  • Faculty Mentor: Daniel Silver
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objective of my project is to attend the Aspen Music Festival, a summer music program in which participants study and perform with other students and professional musicians of world-class caliber. From being able to study solo, chamber, and orchestral music performance with instrumentalists who hold positions in the top orchestras around the world, I will be able to prepare myself substantially for my future career as an aspiring orchestral musician and clarinet teacher, as well as further my performance abilities for the rest of my time at the CU Boulder College of Music.

Silence Equals Death: ACT UP and the Uses of Anger in Politics

  • Student Recipient: Emily Martin, Political Science
  • Faculty Mentor: Michaele Ferguson
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: This project will examine the limits of the usefulness of anger in politics, particularly in the context of social movements, via a case study of the direct-action AIDS advocacy group AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP). Through textual analysis of 185 interviews of ACT UP members compiled at the ACT UP Oral History Project, I will assess how ACT UP mobilized anger, and where the political use of anger was effective and ineffective in achieving ACT UP’s goals. Evaluating the role and usefulness of anger in politics is highly relevant to understanding the current political environment in America.

Bandita: The Political Theory of Iris Marion Young

  • Student Recipient: Jacob Reagan, Spanish / Political Science / Philosophy
  • Faculty Mentor: Michaele Ferguson
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Assistantship
  • Project Description: Professor Ferguson is working on a book entitled Bandita: The Political Theory of Iris Marion Young, which will be the first monograph about Iris Young. Young was a very prolific scholar, working at the intersections of feminist theory, philosophy, political theory, and public policy, who published over 100 articles and chapters, and more than 10 books. As Ferguson’s research assistant, I will be working on two tasks: (1) producing an annotated bibliography of Young’s published work, and (2) providing additional research support as needed (e.g., locating relevant background materials, researching historical details, proofreading manuscripts).

Child Mindfulness Project

  • Student Recipient: Corey Gomis, Psychology / Religious Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Sona Dimidjian
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Assistantship
  • Project Description: My mentor is exploring the relationship between mindfulness based interventions and well-being among children, families, and educators. The team is developing experiments and measures to help advance these areas of research. Potential applications may include the introduction of mindfulness practices with teachers, parents, or students within BVSD and enhanced scientific understanding of the application of mindfulness in school settings. This project is an interdisciplinary collaboration among clinical, developmental, and cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and education. The project provides an ideal context for students in psychology and education to advance their learning and professional goals.

Left Behind: An Investigation Into The Specific Theology of New American Rednecknism in the Neo-Rustbelt

  • Student Recipient: Jeffery Fogg, Religious Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Deborah Whitehead
  • Grant Information: 2018 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The purpose of this project is to establish narrative examples of larger ideologies that govern American civil religion, specifically the theology of American Redneckism in the Neo-Rustbelt. Within America there are specific traditions that inform our religious ideologies that are not linked with any American religious movement. It is these closely held beliefs relating to pseudo-religious imagery, rituals, holidays, origin myths, and martyrs that have created a separate, independent, new religious movement. I will use probability sampling and ethnographically research methods to establish a theology for New American Redneckism and use this research to inform my honors thesis.

Animals in Islam

  • Student Recipient: Anisah Spahn, Humanities / Elementary Education
  • Faculty Mentor: Leslie Irvine
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: I will study how animals are portrayed in the Qur’an and hadiths, or sayings of Prophet Mohammed, and their implications on animal treatment, with the goal of discussing humane treatment methods for different animals. I will study Islamic religious expectations regarding animals, as they oftentimes differ from modern cultural practices. Considerable research examines animal representation in Western societies, but far less is available in English on the Islamic tradition. I fill this gap with applications of Islamic rules to modern animal practices from keeping pets to factory farming. This research will benefit those interested in animal welfare, Islam or both.

Transcribing of Oral History in Rural Brazil

  • Student Recipient: Sydney Berry, International Affairs
  • Faculty Mentor: Tania Martiscelli
  • Grant Information: 2017 Summer, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My objective is to transcribe the oral history of a rural region in Brazil. I will do this while on a global seminar with my mentor. Few people are familiar with rural Brazil so it will be a way to introduce people to a different culture. People reading the stories will benefit by seeing this side of Brazilian culture. The communities I will visit are in danger of being relocated since they live on the outskirts of a national park. I hope my research will help them voice their relationship with the nature, as well as their unique culture.

The Relationship Between Reading Skill and Phonological Grain Size Matching in Adults With and Without Reading Impairment

  • Student Recipient: Laura Vacek, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
  • Faculty Mentor: Christine Brennan
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: Reading skill requires mapping between speech sounds and letters; however grain size mappings may be inconsistent (i.e., “thought” has three sounds but maps to seven letters). Most adults manage to read despite inconsistent granularity, but adults with reading impairment may struggle with these mappings. I will compare adults with and without reading impairment on measures of reading and phonological skill and performance on a grain size matching task. The results will confirm if grain size matching relates to reading skill in adults. Results can lead to improved understanding of underlying deficits in reading disability in adults and to improved interventions.

Senior Showcase 2018

  • Student Recipient: JoAn Howell, BFA, Performance
  • Faculty Mentor: Tamara Meneghini
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: My objective for this research project is to utilize my burning passion for humanity in the field of Theatre Performance, so that I can learn how to better represent and support the oppressed voices in our world: women, children, differing religions, and my own Native American culture. My work is powerful and valuable because it allows me to help create an ethical relationship with an audience that will encourage people to stand up for each other. Specifically, I want to discover how to use culture and theatre to unite people for social change.

Theater Performance BFA Senior Project

  • Student Recipient: Todd Kremer, BFA, Theatre Performance / Film Studies
  • Faculty Mentor: Tamara Meneghini
  • Grant Information: 2017-18 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: The objective of the project is to explore the intersection of Theater and Film as both art forms and as professional institutions. The Student will be writing and directing a script for production in both theatrical and film forms as well as participating in a showcase in New York meant to exhibit the talents of the student and his peers as professional creators, be it in acting, directing, or otherwise.

How to Leave a Battlefield

  • Student Recipient: Sean Guderian, BFA, Performance / Journalism
  • Faculty Mentor: Cecilia Pang
  • Grant Information: 2018-19 Academic Year, Individual Grant
  • Project Description: How do veterans recover from wartime? Do they recover? How have previous generations of soldiers sought healing for their experiences? Media outlets are quick to glorify and document military actions or scandal, but rarely give focus to the recovery of individual soldiers, or the families of those soldiers. Transcriptions from recorded interviews with veterans will be organized into a stage play. The final project will be performed in the Loft Theatre space at the University Theatre late in the Spring 2019 semester, and selected scenes derived from the play will be performed as a part of the department "Senior Showcase."