Additional Opportunities and Student Resources

Work Study


If you are eligible for federal work study, you can receive these funds for work as a campus research assistant and may combine it with UROP.

Federal Work-Study provides part-time jobs for undergraduate and graduate students with financial need, allowing them to earn money to pay education expenses. The program encourages community service work and work related to students’ courses of study.

Refer to the List of Time-Sensitive Opportunities for programs with near-term deadlines.

CU Boulder Programs

The Biological Sciences Initiative (BSI) is a funding and professional development program for current CU Boulder undergraduates. Eligible students conducting original STEM research are paid to work in a laboratory on the CU Boulder or CU Denver Anschutz Medical Campus. Students also attend seminars to enhance the research experience, and summarize their findings through a presentation at the end of the term.

The McNair Scholars Program is a federal TRIO program designed to prepare undergraduate students for doctoral studies through involvement in research and other scholarly activities. McNair participants are either first-generation college students with financial need, or members of a group that is traditionally underrepresented in graduate education and have demonstrated strong academic potential. The goal of the McNair Scholars Program is to increase graduate degree awards for students from underrepresented segments of society.

A special partnership between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and CU Boulder, NIST-PREP places undergraduates, graduate students and post-doctoral researchers in NIST labs to gain research experience alongside NIST scientists. Applicable majors include most engineering departments, biochemistry, chemistry and physics.

The Discovery Learning Apprenticeship (DLA) Program provides funding for undergraduate engineering students to work with college faculty and graduate students. Whether helping develop new diagnostic techniques for heart disease, or detecting the effects of nuclear waste, discovery learning apprentices make the most of their time at CU Boulder by supplementing classroom instruction with real-world engineering experience.

Undergraduate CU Boulder engineering students in the CU SPUR program earn hourly wages (currently $12/hr) while engaging in research with college faculty and graduate students. Positions are advertised in mid-March, and applications are accepted through the end of March for positions for the upcoming summer term.

YOU'RE@CU is an exciting opportunity to gain practical research experience in engineering by linking with a graduate student mentor. Get hands-on experience in your undergraduate years that will inspire you to make a world of difference! 

External Programs

The National Science Foundation (NSF) funds a large number of research opportunities for undergraduate students through its REU Sites program. An REU Site consists of a group of ten or so undergraduates who work in the research programs of the host institution. Each student is associated with a specific research project, where he/she works closely with the faculty and other researchers. Students are granted stipends and, in many cases, assistance with housing and travel. Undergraduate students supported with NSF funds must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States or its possessions. An REU Site may be at either a US or foreign location.  Students must contact the individual sites for information and application materials. NSF does not have application materials and does not select student participants. A contact person and contact information is listed for each site.

EuroScholars is a unique research abroad program designed for advanced and talented undergraduate students from US and Canadian institutions looking for an international research experience. The EuroScholars Program offers these students the opportunity to conduct research at one of the six internationally renowned European research universities, and there are an abundance of academic research projects in a variety of fields to choose from within the participating universities.

Entry Point! identifies and recruits students with apparent and non-apparent disabilities studying in science, engineering, mathematics, computer science, and some fields of business for internship and co-op opportunities.  The AAAS Entry Point! program was created in response to the realization that students with disabilities, even those with strong academic records, were not being noticed as part of the talent pool for STEM employment. AAAS understands that internships are credible paths to competitive and sustained employment; they can be a mechanism for talented students with disabilities to participate in laboratory work, data analysis and other research activities with companies, government agencies and university research programs.  More than 600 individuals have interned through Entry Point! since its inception in 1996.

Amgen Scholars allows undergraduates from across the globe to participate in cutting-edge research opportunities at world-class institutions. Seventeen leading institutions across the U.S., Europe and Japan currently host the summer program. Undergraduate participants benefit from undertaking a research project under top faculty, being part of a cohort-based experience of seminars and networking events, and taking part in a symposium in their respective region (U.S., Europe or Japan) where they meet their peers, learn about biotechnology, and hear from leading scientists.

The American Mathematical Society (AMS) funds a large number of research opportunities for undergraduate students through its REU Sites program. An REU Site consists of a group of ten or so undergraduates who work in the research programs of the host institution. Each student is associated with a specific research project, where he/she works closely with the faculty and other researchers. Students are granted stipends and, in many cases, assistance with housing and travel.

The Explorers Club is proud of its history but also looks toward the future by recognizing the importance of new ideas and avenues of exploration. The Club is deeply committed to supporting the fieldwork of serious researchers and, as part of its public service commitment, offers exploration grants to college undergraduates to foster a new generation of explorers dedicated to the advancement of the scientific knowledge of our world. The average award is approximately $1,500.

Refer to the List of Time-Sensitive Opportunities for programs with near-term deadlines.

Additional Opportunities and Student Resources