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CU research team moves one step closer to printing models of life-like 3D organs

Jan. 26, 2023

A model of your very own kidney made entirely from soft and pliable polymers? Researchers at two CU campuses are on the cusp of 3D printing realistic replicas of human anatomy.

A pregnant belly

Prenatal pollution exposure linked to lower cognitive scores in early life

Jan. 24, 2023

Toddlers whose moms were exposed to higher levels of air pollution during mid- to late-pregnancy tend to score lower on measures of cognition, motor coordination and language skills, according to new CU Boulder research.

Man wearing blindfold holds up a camera on a walking stick to scan a shelf containing several different brands of cereal.

'Smart' walking stick could help visually impaired with groceries, finding a seat

Jan. 19, 2023

For people who are blind or visually impaired, finding the right products in a crowded grocery store can be difficult without help. A team of computer scientists at CU Boulder is trying to change that.

Grasshopper hangs on a twig

Jumpin’ Jehoshaphat! New grasshopper-like material can leap 200 times its own thickness

Jan. 18, 2023

If you plop these thin wafers, made up of several layers of rubber-like material, onto a hot plate, they will begin to warp. Then, suddenly and explosively, they leap into the air.

A farm in Ohio

Air quality improvements lead to more sulfur fertilizer use

Jan. 12, 2023

A new study finds Midwestern soybean and corn farmers replaced lost airborne sulfur with sulfur fertilizer, and the environmental impacts may include downstream mercury contamination.

Gas Works Park in Seattle

Compromised oil and gas wells pose risks to groundwater in Weld County

Jan. 5, 2023

When gas leaks into and contaminates a household water well near an oil and gas drilling site, there is always a question of where it came from. Is it from a failure in the drilling or did the gas migrate naturally? New research from CU Boulder could help definitively answer that question.

Professor Jill Litt checks on a plant with colleagues Evan Coringrato, Erin Decker and Angel Villalobos

The scientific reasons you should resolve to start gardening in 2023

Jan. 5, 2023

The first-ever randomized controlled trial of community gardening shows it boosts fiber intake and physical activity while decreasing stress and anxiety. It could even reduce risk of cancer and chronic illness. And that’s all in the first season of getting your hands dirty.

Person throwing black sand while kneeling in the snow on a mountain

10 stories of exploration and discovery you may have missed in 2022

Dec. 16, 2022

Kick back with a blanket and a mug of hot cocoa to remember a year of groundbreaking science at CU Boulder—and reflect on what lies in store for 2023.

Graduates toss their caps in the air

Access to IUDs, other long-acting contraception boosts college graduation rates

Dec. 15, 2022

Women with easier access to the full range of contraceptive methods, including intrauterine devices and implants, are as much as 12% more likely to obtain a four-year college degree than those with more limited access, according to new research. The study comes amid growing concerns that access to certain forms of contraception is under threat in some areas of the country.

Close up of eyes

Not-so-private eyes: Eye movements hold clues to how we make decisions

Dec. 13, 2022

New findings from mechanical engineers at CU Boulder could, one day, help doctors screen patients for illnesses like depression or Parkinson's Disease.

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