Researcher Erik Funk with a rosy-finch

Rosy-finches are Colorado’s high-alpine specialists—researchers want to know why

Jan. 26, 2023

Birds that can live at 14,000 feet and also breed at sea level might have evolved more quickly than previously thought.

Congressman Joe Neguse, left, and US House of Representatives Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi

Why does climate policy lag science?

Jan. 26, 2023

Despite the Inflation Reduction Act, U.S. progress on climate change remains stuck in a climate conundrum, CU Boulder experts say, hampered by politics, complexity and the scope of the problem.

Indigenous women's movement

When Indigenous communities have legal land rights, this Brazilian forest benefits

Jan. 26, 2023

A CU Boulder-led study shows that between 1985 and 2019 in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest, deforestation decreased and reforestation increased on lands where Indigenous communities had been able to complete a legal process to receive formal recognition of their ancestral lands.

Child in green surroundings

Childhood trauma linked to civic environmental engagement, green behavior

Jan. 23, 2023

A new study based on survey data from hundreds of U.S. adults links experiencing childhood trauma to public environmental engagement later in life, such as writing letters to elected officials or donating time and resources to an organization.

Four elephants walk in a line in the grass

Why biodiversity matters and what the world is doing about it

Jan. 20, 2023

Nations around the world have committed to achieve 30-by-30, protecting 30% of the planet's land and oceans by 2030. CU Boulder's Mara Goldman why this landmark is critical for the world's biodiversity, and what the challenges are to making it a reality.

A farm in Ohio

Air quality improvements lead to more sulfur fertilizer use

Jan. 12, 2023

A new study finds Midwestern soybean and corn farmers replaced lost airborne sulfur with sulfur fertilizer, and the environmental impacts may include downstream mercury contamination.

Looking at an ice core

Study offers most detailed glimpse yet of planet’s past 11,000 summers and winters

Jan. 11, 2023

By analyzing Antarctic ice cores, CU Boulder scientists and an international team of collaborators have revealed the most detailed look yet at the planet’s recent climatic history, including summer and winter temperatures dating back 11,000 years to the beginning of what is known as the Holocene.

Gas Works Park in Seattle

Compromised oil and gas wells pose risks to groundwater in Weld County

Jan. 5, 2023

When gas leaks into and contaminates a household water well near an oil and gas drilling site, there is always a question of where it came from. Is it from a failure in the drilling or did the gas migrate naturally? New research from CU Boulder could help definitively answer that question.

Researchers conduct water sampling.

Ongoing CU research explores impacts, solutions after Marshall Fire

Dec. 21, 2022

The Marshall Fire spurred researchers—many of them personally affected by the fire—to pivot and apply their expertise to the aftermath. One year later, dozens of ongoing research projects continue to explore the science behind what happened that day, the widespread impacts on people, pets and the environment and how we can mitigate future catastrophes amid a changing climate.

miniature satellite about the size of a shoebox

Scientists testing future technology to extend solar energy measurements

Dec. 15, 2022

Since July 2022, a miniature satellite about the size of a shoebox has been orbiting Earth and monitoring how much solar energy reaches the atmosphere, one of the "most important" Earth science measurements. Now, scientists are finalizing their analysis of the first five months of the testing.

Pages