Electriflow butterfly flaps its wings

Origami comes to life with new shape-changing materials

July 20, 2021

Researchers have created butterflies that flap their wings, flower petals that wiggle with the touch of a button and self-folding origami drawing on new advances in soft robotics.

Rioters scale a wall at the Capitol on January 6, 2021. (Credit: CC image via Flickr)

Angry politicians make angry voters, new study finds

July 16, 2021

Political anger in the U.S. has reached a fever pitch in recent years. Now, new research shows that ordinary voters may begin to mirror the angry emotions of the politicians they read about in the news.

Panorama of Coors Field during game

It’s outta here: The physics of baseball at a mile high

July 7, 2021

In 1998, the last time Major League Baseball's All-Star Game was held in Colorado, teams scored a record 21 runs. Engineer Peter Hamlington breaks down why we can expect balls to fly faster and farther at this year's All-Star Game at Coors Field.

Gen. Thompson shakes hand with an ROTC cadet in fatigues

Newest frontier in national security—space—gets boost at CU Boulder

June 28, 2021

The United States Space Force's vice chief of space operations visited campus on June 24, learning about new research on autonomous vehicles, satellites smaller than toaster ovens and more.

Bethy Leonardi speaks to attendees at the first-ever Educator Institute for Equity and Justice in 2018

A Queer Endeavor comes of age in Colorado

June 25, 2021

Just before Denver's Pride weekend, the team behind an innovative effort to make classrooms safer for LGBTQ youth discusses how schools shape what people think is normal.

A close-up of a computer chip.

AI may soon predict how electronics fail

June 21, 2021

"Hotspots," or tiny defects in the components that make up your phone and many other devices, can cause electronics to break down. Engineers are using machine learning techniques to predict ahead of time where they might pop up.

Area 51

How studying UFOs could lead to new scientific breakthroughs

June 8, 2021

This month, a Pentagon task force will release a long-awaited report digging into a topic typically relegated to science fiction movies and tabloids: unidentified flying objects. Professor Carol Cleland talks about the report and why scientists should take weird and mysterious observations seriously.

Ricardo Reyes takes air quality measurements from the back of a classroom filled with kids

Better air quality in some Colorado schools will last long after the pandemic

June 1, 2021

Kids around Colorado are kicking back for summer vacation. But one team of engineers is working to make sure when children come back to school in the fall, the air they breathe will be cleaner and healthier.

Students stick their heads out of car sunroofs as part of a car parade.

Amid a pandemic, educators reimagine the future of K-12 schools

May 20, 2021

Education researchers are increasingly seeing the COVID-19 pandemic as an opportunity to rethink how we teach kids in the United States, making school curricula more relevant to the lives of young people.

This scanning electron microscope image shows the distinct bow tie shape of an optical rectenna.

Scientists debut world’s most efficient 'optical rectennas,' devices that harvest power from heat

May 18, 2021

For decades, researchers have theorized that optical rectennas could sit on everything from bakery ovens to dirigibles flying high above Earth to harvest waste heat and turn it into electricity. But to date, those goals have remained elusive. Now, engineers have unveiled the most efficient optical rectennas yet.

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