Gen. Thompson shakes hand with an ROTC cadet in fatigues

Newest frontier in national security—space—gets boost at CU Boulder

June 28, 2021

The United States Space Force's vice chief of space operations visited campus on June 24, learning about new research on autonomous vehicles, satellites smaller than toaster ovens and more.

Bethy Leonardi speaks to attendees at the first-ever Educator Institute for Equity and Justice in 2018

A Queer Endeavor comes of age in Colorado

June 25, 2021

Just before Denver's Pride weekend, the team behind an innovative effort to make classrooms safer for LGBTQ youth discusses how schools shape what people think is normal.

A close-up of a computer chip.

AI may soon predict how electronics fail

June 21, 2021

"Hotspots," or tiny defects in the components that make up your phone and many other devices, can cause electronics to break down. Engineers are using machine learning techniques to predict ahead of time where they might pop up.

Area 51

How studying UFOs could lead to new scientific breakthroughs

June 8, 2021

This month, a Pentagon task force will release a long-awaited report digging into a topic typically relegated to science fiction movies and tabloids: unidentified flying objects. Professor Carol Cleland talks about the report and why scientists should take weird and mysterious observations seriously.

Ricardo Reyes takes air quality measurements from the back of a classroom filled with kids

Better air quality in some Colorado schools will last long after the pandemic

June 1, 2021

Kids around Colorado are kicking back for summer vacation. But one team of engineers is working to make sure when children come back to school in the fall, the air they breathe will be cleaner and healthier.

Students stick their heads out of car sunroofs as part of a car parade.

Amid a pandemic, educators reimagine the future of K-12 schools

May 20, 2021

Education researchers are increasingly seeing the COVID-19 pandemic as an opportunity to rethink how we teach kids in the United States, making school curricula more relevant to the lives of young people.

This scanning electron microscope image shows the distinct bow tie shape of an optical rectenna.

Scientists debut world’s most efficient 'optical rectennas,' devices that harvest power from heat

May 18, 2021

For decades, researchers have theorized that optical rectennas could sit on everything from bakery ovens to dirigibles flying high above Earth to harvest waste heat and turn it into electricity. But to date, those goals have remained elusive. Now, engineers have unveiled the most efficient optical rectennas yet.

Galago moholi bundled up in a cloth

Pet trade may pose threat to bushbaby conservation

May 17, 2021

At night in southern Africa, primates called bushbabies emit "spooky" vocalizations that sound like crying children. What may be even spookier is the possible future these adorable creatures face.

Image of the globe surrounded by satellites

Crashing Chinese rocket highlights growing dangers of space debris

May 12, 2021

In this Q&A, aerospace engineer Hanspeter Schaub says that the odds of people getting hit by debris falling from space are astronomically low. But collisions in orbit around Earth could still pose a threat to satellites and astronauts.

Stephanie Toliver in a comic book store reading an issue of "Ironheart"

Dreaming of new worlds: Stephanie Toliver celebrates Black women in science fiction and fantasy

May 6, 2021

Stephanie Toliver was in college the first time she read a science fiction and fantasy novel featuring a Black woman as a protagonist. Today, she's working to make sure that the next generation of Black girls don't face the same obstacles.

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