CU-led mountain forest study shows vulnerability to climate change

Sept. 10, 2012

A new University of Colorado Boulder-led study that ties forest “greenness” in the western United States to fluctuating year-to-year snowpack indicates mid-elevation mountain ecosystems are most sensitive to rising temperatures and changes in precipitation and snowmelt.

NOAA selects CU-Boulder to continue joint leadership of CIRES

Aug. 30, 2012

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has selected the University of Colorado Boulder to continue a federal/academic partnership that extends NOAA’s ability to study climate change, improve weather models and better predict how solar storms can disrupt communication and navigation technologies. The selection means that NOAA will continue funding the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, or CIRES, for at least five years and up to 10 more years. CIRES was established at CU-Boulder in 1967.

CU-NOAA study provides first direct evidence of heat-trapping effects of wildfire smoke particles

Aug. 27, 2012

When the Fourmile Canyon Fire erupted west of Boulder in 2010, smoke from the wildfire poured into parts of the city including a site housing scientists from the University of Colorado Boulder’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Arctic sea ice reaches lowest extent ever recorded, says CU-Boulder research team

Aug. 27, 2012

The blanket of sea ice floating on the Arctic Ocean melted to its lowest extent ever recorded since satellites began measuring it in 1979, according to the University of Colorado Boulder’s National Snow and Ice Data Center.

CU-Boulder team wins nearly $780,000 ‘Reinvent the Toilet’ grant from Gates Foundation

Aug. 14, 2012

An interdisciplinary team of student and faculty engineers from the University of Colorado Boulder has won a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for its proposal to develop a solar-biochar toilet for use in developing countries throughout the world. The grant is part of the Reinvent the Toilet Challenge, or RTTC, initiated by the Gates Foundation to address a sanitation challenge affecting nearly 40 percent of the world’s population.

CU-Boulder sources on 2012 election

Aug. 14, 2012

Presidential Election. Kenneth Bickers, professor of political science at the University of Colorado Boulder, can comment on the U.S. presidential race in Colorado and nationally, campaign issues and tactics, the youth vote and the 2012 election in general. He also can discuss whether a political party gains any advantage in the state where it holds its national convention. He can be reached at 303-492-2363 or bickers@colorado.edu .

CU-led team discovers new atmospheric compound tied to climate change and human health issues

Aug. 8, 2012

An international research team led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Helsinki has discovered a surprising new chemical compound in Earth’s atmosphere that reacts with sulfur dioxide to form sulfuric acid, which is known to have significant impacts on climate and health.

Earth still absorbing CO2 even as emissions rise, says new CU-led study

Aug. 1, 2012

Despite sharp increases in carbon dioxide emissions by humans in recent decades that are warming the planet, Earth’s vegetation and oceans continue to soak up about half of them, according to a surprising new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

CU-Boulder student investigates biochar for water treatment in developing countries

July 17, 2012

A variety of public health issues plague the refugees from Burma living on the Thai border, not the least of which is drinking water contaminated by bacteria and pesticides. Yet few low-cost, sustainable and appropriate treatment technologies are available to people in rural and developing communities to ensure water safety.

Nitrogen pollution changing Rocky Mountain National Park vegetation, says CU-Boulder study

July 5, 2012

A new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder indicates air pollution in the form of nitrogen compounds emanating from power plants, automobiles and agriculture is changing the alpine vegetation in Rocky Mountain National Park.

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