2019-20 Research Opportunity Seminar Series

Mondays 12:00-12:50 • Commons Room, Gamow Tower

For more information on this seminar, contact Bethany Wilcox.

  • September 9
    • Presenter 1: Svenja Knappe
    • Presenter 2: Meredith Betterton
  • September 16
    • Presenter 1: Ivan Milic
    • Presenter 2: Ivan Smalyukh
  • September 23
    • Presenter 1: Daniel Dessau
      • Title: Measuring and Controlling Macroscopic Quantum Matter
      • Description:  Our experimental condensed matter physics lab is focused on measuring and controlling novel quantum matter, especially matter with macroscopic quantum phase coherence, topological states, magnetism, or a combination of the above.  I will briefly describe two projects on novel forms of superconductivity; a) one in which we are utilizing ultrafast optical pulses in an effort to enhance superconducting phase coherence/superconducting transition temperatures, and b) one in which we are working to isolate and “braid” half quantum vortices in triplet superconductors for quantum computation applications.
    • Presenter 2: Sandeep Sharma
      • Title:  Algorithms for the numerical solution of electronic structure theory 
      • Description:  I will start by discussing why it is difficult to obtain numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation. There are fundamental limitations that restrict the accuracy with which we can obtain the low energy spectrum and spectral functions. This will be followed by a brief discussion of the various methods we use in our group to try to overcome some of this limitation, these include tensor network states, quantum monte Carlo and techniques based on machine learning.
  • September 30
    • Presenter 1: Scott Papp
      • Title: Exploring quantum nonlinear photonics to solve hard problems
      • Description:  Integrated photonics is a versatile tool for efficiently making, guiding, and detecting light. A new direction is to explore intriguing nonlinear behaviors in integrated photonics that manipulate light according to quantum-based design. I will discuss integrated-photonics experiments that produce optical-frequency combs for ultraprecise sensing, enable scaling in ultrahigh-speed data networks, and revolutionize the technology and applications of ultracold quantum gases.
  • October 7 — No speakers
  • October 14
    • Presenter 1: Michael Schneider
      • Title: Single Flux Quantum Circuits for “Brain-inspired” Neuromorphic Computing
      • Description: Neuromorphic computing promises to dramatically improve the efficiency of certain computational tasks, such as perception and decision making. While software and specialized hardware implementations of neural networks have made tremendous progress, both implementations are still many orders of magnitude less energy efficient than the human brain. This talk will introduce the current state of neuromorphic computing and discuss the recent hardware advances that have bolstered the progress of machine learning. I will discuss how a new superconducting platform, based on dynamically reconfigurable magnetic Josephson junctions with spiking energies less than one attojoule, could lead to large-scale neuromorphic systems with better energy efficiency than the human brain.
    • Presenter 2:Lee Korshoj
      • Title: Single-molecule optical sequencing: Using classical and quantum-entangled photon imaging and spectroscopy
      • Description:  Advances in precision medicine require high-throughput, inexpensive, point-of-care diagnostic methods with multiomics capability for detecting a wide range of biomolecules and their molecular variants. For example, a rapid scan of the entire genome for methylation patterns using single-molecule sequencing (without any amplification) can reveal potential cancer markers. Optical techniques have offered many promising advances toward such a method. However, the inability to squeeze light with several hundred-nanometer wavelengths into angstrom-scale volume for single-molecule measurements had hindered further progress. This limitation has been circumvented by squeezing light into nanometer-scale mode volumes using surface plasmon polaritons, using three-dimensional nanofocusing of light into predetermined spatial locations with desired single-molecules being probed. Further, by analyzing the relative nucleobase content with Raman spectroscopy in a single-molecule block optical sequencing method using classical light developed in our group,  we achieved 93.3% accuracy for predicting nucleobase content in label-free DNA k-mer blocks (where k = 10),  RNA, and chemically modified nucleobases, for extensions to transcriptomic and epigenetic studies. We also demonstrated the applicability of this technique for rapid diagnostics of several cancer markers, “rare-genetic diseases,” and specific drug-resistance genes and causative pathogens in case of infections.  We will further advance this method and analyze the applicability of quantum-entangled photon spectroscopy in this project. Using a comparison of measurements obtained using classical and quantum-entangled photons, we will analyze the potential to improve this method further. Also, we will increase the throughput of acquisition using a novel Quantum-dot microspectrometer and inexpensive plasmonic substrates to potentially acquire and analyze the sequence of millions of nucleotides (DNA and RNA), amino acids (proteins and glycoproteins), sugars and other relevant biomolecules. This can lead to the development of new molecular markers to quantify healthy and diseased states using a single-molecule optical spectroscopic method, leading to new and unexplored biomedical diagnostic tools to advance precision medicine.
  • October 21
    • Presenter 1: Juliet Gopinath
      • Title: Opportunities in quantum fiber sensing and nonlinear integrated optics in the Gopinath group
      • Description: Fiber sensing with classical light has been used successful for the detection of strains in very harsh environments.   Fiber enables remote sensing in a compact and effective format. However, there are limits on distance and resolution set by the sensitivity of detectors.   I will discuss a new project examining whether quantum methods can improve the performance of current fiber sensors.   I will also discuss another effective way to compact photonic systems - integrated nonlinear photonics, with a specific emphasis on microresonators.
    • Presenter 2: Edward Kinney 
      • Title: Illuminating the Internal Structure of the Proton
      • Description: It is well-known that the proton is made up of fundamental particles called quarks, which interact via the forces described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). However, beyond knowledge of the proton “contents,” our knowledge of the actual momentum and spatial distributions of the quarks and surrounding QCD fields is very limited. Studying the proton using electromagnetic probes with sufficient resolution to see structure smaller than 10-15m has proved successful, but quite challenging. After a brief review of the important questions of the field of quark-gluon physics, we will describe the active research programs that we are involved in and also an outlook for the future research opportunities in the next decades.
  • October 28
    • Presenter 1: Jamie Nagle
      • Title:  Experiments to create and study quark-gluon plasma at T = 3 trillion Kelvin
      • Description:  Experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider create small nuclei-sized droplets of quark-gluon plasma, where quarks and gluons are no longer confined into hadrons.    The nuclear experiment group at CU Boulder works on the ATLAS experiment and sPHENIX experiment to study such droplets.    We detail a set of measurements currently underway to determine the most fundamental properties of this plasma.
    • Presenter 2: Pete Hopkins
      • Title:  Quantum Engineering and Advanced Communications using Superconductive Electronics
      • Description: Superconductive electronic circuits are inherently quantum in nature, can be operated at very high data rates (~ 100 GHz), high energy-efficiencies (~ 0.1 attojoule/bit), and are the leading technology used in quantum computers. Our team at NIST has world-renowned expertise in the design, simulation, fabrication, and cryogenic experimental verification of high-speed analog and digital superconductive electronics.  I will describe two projects that our group is currently pursuing: developing 5G millimeter-wave (> 30 GHz) sources for the wireless communications industry and investigating the use of superconducting arbitrary waveform synthesizers for the control and readout of 10 mK qubits. Interested students will gain experience with cleanroom fabrication, electronic design tools, simulation (for quantum computing and signal processing), and low temperature experimental design and test.
      • More Info:
        https://www.nist.gov/programs-projects/flux-quantum-electronics
        https://www.nist.gov/pml/quantum-electromagnetics/superconductive-electronics
  • November 4
    • Presenter 1: Alysia Marino
    • Presenter 2:
  • November 11
    • Presenter 1: 
    • Presenter 2: 
  • November 18
    • Presenter 1: Andrew Wilson
    • Presenter 2:
  • November 25 (Fall Break — No Seminar)
  • December 2
    • Presenter 1:
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  • December 9
    • Presenter 1:
    • Presenter 2: