Published: Oct. 2, 2017

Izaak Taylor, “'Legitimacy and Security Policy”

Friday, Oct. 6, 12:00 – 1:00

Hellems 269

Students are invited to join this talk on campus!
Izaak Taylor is a CU Scholar in Residence this year at the Center for Western Civilization, Thought, and Policy.

Many political philosophers believe that, in order for a state to be legitimate, it must provide a certain degree of security for its citizens. Yet it is unclear what exact institutional arrangement governments must put in place in order to meet this "security condition". Some hold that relying on the standard practices associated with national defence (a standing army, weapons systems, intelligence services, and so on) is enough; although international cooperation on security matters may often be useful, on this view, it is not necessary for legitimacy. Against this, I argue that, given the sort of good security is, it cannot in principle be supplied solely at the level of state institutions. International cooperation on security matters, far from being a matter of discretion on the part of states, as is often assumed, is in fact a core requirement of state legitimacy.