Film Screening: "The Dybbuk"

Film Screening: The Dybbuk (1937)

Sunday, September 23, 2018
6:00 PM | Atlas 100, CU Boulder Campus

Part of CU's Leonard Bernstein at 100 Festival.
This event is free and open to the public.

RSVP to "The Dybbuk" Film Screening


Scene from "The Dybbuk"Join the College of Music and campus partners the Program in Jewish Studies and the Department of Cinema Studies & Moving Image Arts for a screening of the 1937 film "The Dybbuk." The film inspired Leonard Bernstein's musical compositions for the 1974 ballet of the same title.

The screening will be preceded by short talks about Bernstein and the film by Professor of Piano Andrew Cooperstock, Associate Professor of Music Theory Yonatan Malin, Director of the Program in Jewish Studies Nan Goodman, and Director of the Department of Cinema Studies & Moving Image Arts Ernesto Acevedo-Muñoz, as well as Kathryn Bernheimer, director of ACE: Arts, Culture and Education at the Boulder Jewish Community Center.


This film screening is part of CU's Leonard Bernstein at 100 Festival, celebrating the 100th birthday of Leonard Bernstein, composer, conductor, educator, musician, cultural ambassador, and humanitarian. The festival is hosted by CU's College of Music. Learn more and find the full event line up here.

Peak to Peak Lecture in Carbondale

Refugees: Sanctuary, Hospitality and Solidarity

A CU Boulder Peak to Peak Lecture with Professor Beverly Weber in Carbondale, CO

Thursday, October 4, 2018
6:00 PM | Carbondale Branch Library Community Room
320 Sopris Avenue, Carbondale, CO 81623

This event is free and open to the public.


In the last few years, Germany and the United States have faced dramatically different situations surrounding refugee migration: while the US issued a ban that interrupted refugee migration, Germany welcomed (not without great controversy) well over a million refugees. Both countries have increased deportation of long-time residents at the same time. In her talk, Professor Beverly Weber will discuss these developments and the rise of the notions of sanctuary in the US and hospitality in Germany. She will consider how the history of refugees during and immediately after the Holocaust raise important questions for ethical action and solidarity today.

Professor Beverly Weber headshotBeverly Weber is Associate Professor of German Studies and Jewish Studies, and Director of Graduate Studies (Program in Jewish Studies) at the University of Colorado Boulder. She is the author of Violence and Gender in the “New” Europe: Islam in German Culture (Palgrave, 2013) which examines the intersections of race and gender in public discussions of Islam, as well as Muslim artistic responses to those discussions. She has published widely on race, gender, immigration and refugee migration in contemporary Germany; as well as on contemporary German literature.


This event is brought to you by Carbondale Arts and the Carbondale Branch Library in partnership with the CU Boulder Program in Jewish Studies and the CU Boulder Office for Outreach and Engagement. It is part of the CU Boulder Peak to Peak Lecture Series, which brings CU Boulder humanities scholars to communities around Colorado to share innovative perspectives of historical figures, events, and enduring questions.

Community Talks Lecture with Rukhl Schaechter

How the Forverts is Being
Transformed in the Digital Era

Community Talks lecture with Rukhl Schaechter, editor of the Yiddish Forward

Thursday, October 11, 2018
7:00 PM | Old Main Theater, CU Boulder campus

This event is free and open to the public.

RSVP to Rukhl Schaechter's Public Lecture


Forverts readers on subwayIn this Community Talks lecture, Rukhl Schaechter will explore how the Forverts, founded in 1897 as a socialist newspaper for Jewish immigrants, has gone through a number of phases, in order to adapt to the changing demographic of its readership. Today, there is a growing interest in the Yiddish language and culture, not only in the Diaspora (particularly the US, Germany and Poland) but even in Israel, where Yiddish had been maligned for years as "a language of the weak, oppressed Jew" but is now being reclaimed by a number of Ashkenazi Israelis, both secular and religious, who see it as an important part of their Jewish heritage. In addition, many Hasidim, the largest Yiddish-speaking community today, now read the Forverts on their smartphones, since it brings them material they don't get in their own newspapers. Through its website and social media, the Forverts now serves all these groups as an international clearinghouse the latest Yiddish news, analyses cooking shows and music videos.

Schaechter's public lecture is part of the Program in Jewish Studies Community Talks Series, Yiddishkvell: An Appreciation of All Things Yiddish.


The Powerful Role Women Played in the Yiddish-Speaking Shtetl

Colloquium with Rukhl Schaechter, editor of the Yiddish Forward

Thursday, October 11, 2018
11:30 AM - 1:00 PM | Location and pre-ciruclated reading distributed upon RSVP

Many people believe that women in traditional Ashkenazi Jewish societies played a secondary role to their husbands but in fact, these women were imbued with a good deal of power in the family structure. A child's religion followed the religion of the mother; last names often followed the mother's name (Gittelson = Gittel's son) as opposed to Anglo-Saxon Protestant custom where last names followed the father (Johnson = John's son); women were the dominant voice in the home and were often the major breadwinners. This colloquium will be accompanied by Yiddish phrases and proverbs which illustrate women's power in these societies.


Rukhl Schaechter, editor of the Yiddish ForwardRukhl Schaechter is the editor of the Yiddish Forward (Forverts) and is both the first woman to hold that position since its founding in 1897 and the first editor of the Forverts to be born in the United States. Since taking the helm, Schaechter and her staff have increased the Yiddish Forward’s profile. Boosted by active Facebook and YouTube channels, international podcasts, regularly translated articles and subtitled videos have found broad audiences. One of the videos, a Yiddish rendition of Leonard Cohen’s song, “Hallelujah,” translated and performed by renowned klezmer musician Daniel Kahn, garnered close to a million views.

Schaechter produces and co-stars in the Forverts cooking videos — in Yiddish with English subtitles. Together with food scholar and gourmet chef Eve Jochnowitz, she demonstrates how to prepare traditional Ashkenazi delicacies like the now-trendy babkas or blintzes and kasha varnishkes, which are at risk of being forgotten by new generations of American Jews with no living link to the east European food traditions.

As editor, Schaechter has brought in a number of new writers, including women, both from secular and Hasidic backgrounds, to mirror the eclectic landscape of Yiddish writing today. The Yiddish Forward has become a clearinghouse for the latest developments in the Yiddish world with almost daily news reports related to Yiddish language and culture.

Before Schaechter became a journalist, she was a prize-winning Yiddish short story writer as well as a songwriter. Four songs she composed, including “Vaserl” (Little Stream) which she co-wrote with Paula Teitelbaum, are performed on the record album of the same name. “Vaserl” now serves as the unofficial theme song for the Jewish People’s Philharmonic Chorus. Schaechter is a graduate of Barnard College and has a second bachelors in Jewish literature from the Jewish Teachers Seminary - Herzliah, as well as a masters in early childhood education from Bank Street College. She is the mother of three grown sons, all fluent in Yiddish, and an infant grandson (not fluent in Yiddish, yet). You can also follow her on Facebook.


Rukhl Schaechter's is hosted by the Program in Jewish Studies and is part of the Community Talks Series, made possible in part by a grant from Rose Community Foundation. Community Talks features nationally and internationally renowned scholars, authors, artists, and performers for themed public events with the goal of enriching community learning and expanding access to academic programming on Jewish culture and history.  Become a Friend of Community Talks Today!

2018 Jim & Diane Shneer Fellow

From the Frankfurt Lehrhaus to Havurat Shalom: Fellowship, Renewal, Counterculture

Faculty and Student Colloquium with Sam Shonkoff
2018 Jim & Diane Shneer Fellow in Post-Holocaust American Judaism

Thursday, October 25, 2018
11:30 AM - 1:00 PM | Location and pre-circulated readings avaliable upon RSVP to CUJewish Studies@colorado.edu.


The Program in Jewish Studies and the University Libraries' Special Collections, Archives, and Preservations annually support a visiting scholar whose research intersts take advantage of the unique resources in the Post-Holocaust American Judaism Collections through the Jim and Diane Shneer Fellowship in Post-Holocaust American Judaism.

The 2018 Shneer Fellow is Professor Sam Shonkoff, Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion and Jewish Studies at Oberlin College. Professor Shonkoff will be in residence at CU Boulder October 22 - 25, 2018 conducting research in the Post-Holocaust American Judaism Collections.

Professor Shonkoff will present a faculty and student colloquium on Thursday, October 25 on his archival work with the Zalman M. Schachter-Shalomi Papers, held at CU Boulder. His research in the Post-Holocaust American Judaism Collections supports his larger project on the formative years of Havurat Shalom in Somerville, Massachusetts and the Jewish counterculture of the 1960s and 1970s more broadly. Schachter-Shalomi was a founding member and teacher of Havurat Shalom in 1968, and he had an especially profound impact on that community's own very influential approaches to prayer and Hasidic sources.

Headshot of visiting scholar Sam ShonkoffSam Berrin Shonkoff is the Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion and Jewish Studies at Oberlin College. He holds a PhD in History of Judaism from the University of Chicago Divinity School, an MA in Religion and Jewish Studies from the University of Toronto, and a BA in Religious Studies from Brown University. Shonkoff's edited volume Martin Buber: His Intellectual and Scholarly Legacy was published this year, and his writings have also appeared recently in the Journal of Religion, The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy, and Brill’s Library of Contemporary Jewish Philosophers.

Learn more about the Jim and Diane Shneer Fellowship in Post-Holocaust American Judaism.


Jim and Diane ShneerAbout the Jim and Diane Shneer Endowed Fellowship Fund

Sam Shonkoff's visit is made possible by the Jim and Diane Shneer Endowed Fellowship Fund, which supports the initiative to make the University of Colorado Boulder a center for the study of American Judaism after the Holocaust. To accomplish that goal, the Fund supports the active effort of building archival resources for research, hosting scholars conducting that research, and supporting our students to learn the skills of information management, archiving, and digital literacy.

Learn More about the Jim and Diane Shneer Endowed Fellowship Fund.


About the Post-Holocaust American Judaism Collections

The Program in Jewish Studies and the University of Colorado Libraries' Special Collections, Archives, and Preservation Department annually support a visiting scholar whose research interests take advantage of the unique resources in the Post-Holocaust American Judaism Collections. The Post-Holocaust American Judaism Collections provide access to materials examining Judaism and the Jewish experience as a religious re-engagement, social movement, and philosophy of spiritual transformation in America from the late 1940s to the present.

Explore the Post-Holocaust American Judaism Collections.

Concert Featuring Songs in Yiddish

Concert with
Daniel Kahn & the Painted Bird

Thursday, November 8, 2018
7:00 PM | Old Main Theater, CU Boulder Campus

This event is free and open to the public.

RSVP to Daniel Kahn & the Painted Bird


Daniel Kahn & the Painted Bird band photoDaniel Kahn & the Painted Bird is a German-based klezmer band founded by Kahn in 2005. Described as “an absolute must for lovers of unusual, intelligent, challenging, exciting folk music and a blast at every instant,” the band will perform a free concert featuring songs in Yiddish this November 2018 on the CU Boulder campus, as part of the Program in Jewish Studies Community Talks Series, Yiddishkvell: An Appreciation of All Things Yiddish.

A Detroit area native, Daniel Kahn attended the University of Michigan where he studied acting, directing, playwriting and poetry. After finishing his studies he lived, played music, recorded, acted, directed plays and composed theater music in New Orleans, Detroit, New York and Ann Arbor. He has received awards for his playwriting, poetry, acting, and composing. Learn more on the band's website.


Daniel Kahn & the Painted Bird's visit is hosted by the Program in Jewish Studies and is part of the Community Talks Series, made possible in part by a grant from Rose Community Foundation. Community Talks features nationally and internationally renowned scholars, authors, artists, and performers for themed public events with the goal of enriching community learning and expanding access to academic programming on Jewish culture and history.  Become a Friend of Community Talks Today!

DU's 16th Annual Fred Marcus Memorial Holocaust Lecture

From Witness to Perpetrator: The Active Role of Nazi Women in the Holocaust

A conversation with Professor Wendy Lower of Claremont McKenna College &
Professor Adam Rovner of the University of Denver

Sunday, November 11, 2018
4:00 PM | Elaine Wolf Theatre, MACC at the JCC
350 S. Dahlia St, Denver, CO 80246

Tickets are $18; Free tickets available for students, educators & Holocaust survivors.
For ticketing and more information about this event, please visit DU's Center for Judaic Studies, Holocaust Awareness Institute website.
Please contact the Center for Judaic Studies at HAI@du.edu with any questions about this event.


Professor Wendy Lower“500,000 women had front-row seats to the Final Solution . . . and yet their presence, and their atrocities, have been largely ignored for the last 70 years” [LA Review of Books]. After WWII, many complicit women were excused for their roles entirely; lawyers argued, and judges agreed, that Nazi women could not be held accountable for the crimes of the men around them. In her important book, Professor Wendy Lower (John K. Roth Professor of History and George R. Roberts Fellow and Director of Mgrublian Center for Human Rights; Claremont McKenna College) questions this historical narrative not only by uncovering historical details that have often been overlooked, but by inviting us to question the line between individuals and their societies, as well as the line between witnesses, bystanders, accomplices, and perpetrators: Aren’t Nazi women culpable for standing by as witnesses, taking lives, and serving as accomplices? Lower fills an historical gap by answering “yes” to this question. “Genocide,” Lower argues, “is also women’s business.” Join us for an in-depth conversation with Professor Lower on these and other topics as we discuss her acclaimed book, Hitler’s Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields.


Professor Wendy Lower's visit marks the 16th Annual Fred Marcus Memorial Holocaust Lecture hosted by the Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Denver. This event is cosponsored by the Program in Jewish Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder, Holocaust Awareness Institute, Mizel Arts and Culture Center, and Neustadt JAAMM Fest.