Mysticism Round Table

Jewish Mysticism Working Group Roundtable

with Dr. David Sanders, Professor Sarah Pessin, and Professor Zvi Ish-Shalom

Thursday, December 7, 2017 | 7:00PM - 9:00PM
Chancellor's Silver and Gold Room, University Club | CU Boulder campus
Space is limited. RSVP required to CUJewishStudies@colorado.edu.

Sefirot with ShekhinahMysticism has become increasingly central to American Judaism and increasingly accessible to people of all faiths. The Jewish Mysticism Working Group Roundtable involves students, faculty, and community members in a discussion about various trends in and concerns of Jewish mysticism over time and up to today. The Roundtable represents the inaugural session of the Program in Jewish Studies’ Working Group on Jewish Mysticism and will feature presentations by notable scholars and practitioners of Jewish mysticism followed by audience discussion.

This year's Round Table will include discussions with Dr. David Sanders, Founder and Executive Director of Kabbalah Experience, Professor Sarah Pessin, Director of the Center for Judaic Studies and Professor of Philosophy at Denver University, and Professor Zvi Ish-Shalom, Associate Professor at Naropa University. The discussion will be moderated by Professor Nan Goodman, Director of the Program in Jewish Studies and Professor of English and Jewish Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder.

About Dr. David Sanders

Dr. David Sanders – Kabbalah ExperienceDr. David Sanders combines over thirty years of experience as both a psychologist and Kabbalah teacher helping guide people to a deeper awareness and fulfillment in their lives. HIs own transformation from eligious studies to mysticism intrigued him to broaden the stdy of the Kabbalah to practical spiritual growth – helping others to challenge their preceptions of the way they view themselves and the world. Sanders is the founder and Director of the Kabbalah Experience in Denver, CO and maintains an active thearpy practice, specializing in working with couples and families.

About Professor Sarah Pessin

Professor Sarah Pessin – The University of Denver (DU)Sarah Pessin is Professor of Philosophy and Jewish Thought, as well as the Interfaith Chair and Director of the Center for Judaic Studies at The University of Denver (DU). Sarah works on topics in philosophy and theology with an emphasis on exile and fragility in personal identity and inter-human community-making. She is the author of numerous publications on Jewish and Islamic Neoplatonism (including her 2013 book, Ibn Gabirol's Theology of Desire with Cambridge University Press); more recently, she has begun publishing on the post-Holocaust philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas. She is broadly interested in the sacred nature of inter-human response, and is currently working on a range of projects, including a study of the limits of forgiveness and non-forgiveness.


The Jewish Mysticism Working Group Round Table is part of the Community Talks Series, made possible in part by a grant from Rose Community Foundation. A subscription series, Community Talks features nationally and internationally renowned scholars, authors, artists, and performers for themed public events with the goal of enriching community learning and expanding access to academic programming on Jewish culture and history.  Learn more and subscribe today.

The Nobel Lecture Series - Fall 2017

Elie Wiesel: Nobel Peace Prize Winner, Holocaust Survivor, Moral Authority, and Political Activist

Presented by Professor David Shneer

Monday, December 4, 2017 | 7:00 PM
Boulder Book Store on the Pearl St. Mall | 1107 Pearl Street, Boulder, CO

This event is hosted by the Boulder Book Store. If you have questions, please visit their website by clicking here.


The Boulder Book Store and the University of Colorado Boulder present The Nobel Lecture Series, a series of lectures on Nobel Prize winning authors from around the world presentd by faculty from CU Boulder. Professor David Shneer will present work from Elie Wiesel, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. This event will explore Wiesel’s many legacies with a focus on his early years during the Cold War as we explore the relationship between literary recreation, Holocaust survival, and moral and political authority. Professor Shneer and students from CU Boulder will be reading from Wiesel's work in English, Hebrew, and Yiddish. 

This lecture is free and open to everybody. Refreshments will be served. 

About Elie Wiesel
Elie Wiesel - Nobel Lecture SeriesAfter surviving Auschwitz and Buchenwald, Elie Wiesel spent more than ten years as a freelance journalist for Jewish publications in Hebrew and Yiddish based in Paris and then New York.  In 1959, he published La Nuit (Night), a rewriting of his 1956 original Yiddish literary recreation of survival, And the World Was Silent (Un di velt hot geshvign). For his objectivity and moral sobriety in the face of evil, six years after Night’s appearance, Wiesel published The Jews of Silence, a sharply critical book about Soviet policy towards its Jewish population that he originally wrote as a series of Hebrew-language articles for the Israeli newspaper Haaretz. Twenty years after that, in 1986 he won the Nobel Peace Prize, and twenty years after that, in 2006, he toured Auschwitz with Oprah Winfrey.

2018 Annual Holocaust Lecture

Inheritance Trouble: Migrant Archives of Holocaust Remembrance

2018 Annual Holocaust Lecture with Professor Michael Rothberg

In honor of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27

Thursday, January 25, 2018 | 7:00PM - 8:30PM
Old Main Theater | CU Boulder campus

Free and open to the public. RSVP to CUJewishStudies@colorado.edu.


Michael RothbergHow should we think about the transmission of Holocaust memory more than seventy years after the defeat of Nazi Germany? What lessons do the events of the Shoah bear for a moment in which far-right political movements are once again on the rise? In order to address such questions, Professor Michael Rothberg considers immigrants’ engagement with the Holocaust in contemporary Germany. The works of art, literature, and performance that he will discuss model alternative ways of remembering the Nazi genocide in the twenty-first century and suggest possibilities for an ethically and politically engaged memory work.

Professor Rothberg's lecture is presented in honor of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27.

About Professor Michael Rothberg

Michael Rothberg is the 1939 Society Samuel Goetz Chair in Holocaust Studies and Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Los Angeles. His latest book is Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization (2009), published by Stanford University Press in their “Cultural Memory in the Present” series. He is also the author of Traumatic Realism: The Demands of Holocaust Representation (2000), and has co-edited The Holocaust: Theoretical Readings (2003) and special issues of the journals Criticism, Interventions, Occasion, and Yale French Studies. He is currently completing The Implicated Subject: Beyond Victims and Perpetrators and Inheritance Trouble: Migrant Archives of Holocaust Remembrance (with Yasemin Yildiz).

2018 Visiting Author

Paradise Lost and Found

How a Jewish Kid from Los Angeles Traveled to Wartime Iraq in Search of Roots, Reconciliation and His Father's Improbable Life Story

An Evening with Award-Winning Author and Journalist, Ariel Sabar

Thursday, February 8, 2018 | 7:00PM - 8:30PM
Old Main Theater | CU Boulder campus

Free and open to the public. RSVP to CUJewishStudies@colorado.edu.


My Father's Paradise Book CoverGrowing up in materialistic 1980s Los Angeles, Ariel Sabar wanted nothing to do with his father. Yona Sabar was a distinguished professor at UCLA and one of the world’s foremost experts on Aramaic, the 3,000-year-old language of the Jewish Talmud — and of Jesus. But Ariel saw his father as a stone-age relic, a walking fashion tragedy who couldn’t get his clothes to match and refused to see a barber about his out-of-control, Einstein-like hair. Yona had been born in an ancient village of Aramaic-speaking Jews in the mountains of Kurdish Iraq—the oldest corner of the Jewish diaspora — but for Ariel, his father might well have been born on the moon. Then Ariel had his own son, and everything changed.

In his talk, Ariel weaves together the remarkable story of the Kurdish Jews and their Aramaic tongue with the moving tale of how a consummate California kid came to write a book about his family’s Kurdish roots. The book, My Father’s Paradise: A Son’s Search for his Jewish Past in Kurdish Iraq, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography, one of the highest honors in American letters. 

Ariel SabarAbout Ariel Sabar

Ariel Sabar won the National Book Critics Circle Award for his debut book, My Father's Paradise: A Son's Search for his Jewish Past in Kurdish Iraq (2008). His second book, Heart of the City (2011), was called a "beguiling romp" (New York Times) and an "engaging, moving and lively read" (Toronto Star). His Kindle Single, The Outsider: The Life and Times of Roger Barker (2014), was a best-selling nonfiction short. 

Sabar is also an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, The Atlantic, Harper's, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Mother Jones, and This American Life, among many other places. He graduated magna cum laude from Brown University. Learn more on his website, arielsabar.com.


Ariel Sabar's visit is part of the Community Talks Series, made possible in part by a grant from Rose Community Foundation. A subscription series, Community Talks features nationally and internationally renowned scholars, authors, artists, and performers for themed public events with the goal of enriching community learning and expanding access to academic programming on Jewish culture and history.  Learn more and subscribe today.

2018 Sephardic Studies Visiting Scholar

Jewish Autonomy in a Slave Society: The Eurafrican Jews of Suriname, South America

Lecture with Professor Aviva Ben-Ur, Sephardic Studies Visiting Scholar

Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | 7:00PM - 8:30PM
CU Boulder campus (location TBA)
Free and open to the public. RSVP to CUJewishStudies@colorado.edu.
 

Suriname, a Dutch colony established on the South American mainland in the 1660s, was among the largest slave societies of the hemisphere. Its Jewish community, founded during the same decade, was granted exceptional liberties, including religious tolerance, unrestricted economic opportunities, and, most remarkably, the privilege to self-govern according to its own religious and secular laws. This political autonomy also empowered Jews to convert their slaves to Judaism, resulting in the rise of a sizeable class of people collectively known in the sources as “mulatto Jews” or “Jewish mulattoes.” In her talk, Professor Aviva Ben-Ur will address the emergence of Eurafrican Jews, their legal status, cultural characteristics, social activism, and their experience of Jewish autonomy in a colony where upwards of 96 percent of the population was unfree.

Aviva Ben-UrAbout Professor Aviva Ben-Ur

Aviva Ben-Ur is Professor in the Department of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and holds adjunct appointments in the Department of History and in the Programs of Spanish and Portuguese and Comparative Literature. She specializes in Atlantic Jewish history and slavery studies and is the author of Jewish Autonomy in a Slave Society: Suriname in the Atlantic World, 1651-1825 (forthcoming with University of Pennsylvania Press), Remnant Stones: The Jewish Cemeteries and Synagogues of Suriname: Essays (Hebrew Union College Press, 2012) and Remnant Stones: The Jewish Cemeteries of Suriname: Epitaphs (Hebrew Union College Press, 2009), both co-authored with Rachel Frankel, and Sephardic Jews in America: A Diasporic History (New York University Press, 2009).


Aviva Ben-Ur's visit is part of the Community Talks Series, made possible in part by a grant from Rose Community Foundation. A subscription series, Community Talks features nationally and internationally renowned scholars, authors, artists, and performers for themed public events with the goal of enriching community learning and expanding access to academic programming on Jewish culture and history.  Learn more and subscribe today.

2018 Sondra and Howard Bender Visiting Scholar

Sephardim

Lecture with French Senator and Professor Esther Benbassa

2018 Sondra and Howard Bender Visiting Scholar

Thursday, April 19, 2018 | 7:00PM - 8:30PM
Old Main Theater | CU Boulder campus
Free and open to the public. RSVP to CUJewishStudies@colorado.edu.
 

Esther BenbassaThe Program in Jewish Studies is thrilled to welcome French senator and renowned Sephardic scholar Professor Esther Benbassa to serve as the 2018 Sondra and Howard Bender Visiting Scholar. Professor Benbassa will be in residence at CU Boulder April 18-19, 2018 and present a public lecture on Sephardim.

Professor Benbassa's visit is made possible by the Sondra and Howard Bender Visiting Scholars Endowed Fund, honoring the lives of Sondra and Howard Bender. Thank you to the Bender Foundation and the family of Eileen and Richard Greenberg for their generous support!


Esther Benbassa's visit is part of the Community Talks Series, made possible in part by a grant from Rose Community Foundation. A subscription series, Community Talks features nationally and internationally renowned scholars, authors, artists, and performers for themed public events with the goal of enriching community learning and expanding access to academic programming on Jewish culture and history.  Learn more and subscribe today.