For Successful Lecture Capture:

  • Avoid wearing shirts with tight, repetitive patterns or solid black or white shirts.
  • Arrive to the studio five minutes prior to class start time for the microphone check.
  • Be aware of the placement of the lavaliere microphone as jewelry and fabric folds can affect the audio quality.
  • Remind students not to touch or place items on the desk microphones. This creates extraneous noise that interferes with the recording.
  • Keep your classroom door closed. Your operator should make sure this is taken care of but it is something good to keep in mind.
  • Speak in a normal voice. In the larger classrooms, there is an audio broadcast system so that students seated at the rear of the room will be able to hear you clearly.
  • Please inform the studio staff if you prefer to move around the classroom while lecturing. While most of your presentation should be given from behind the desk/podium, some movement is permitted within the lighted area.
  • Write legibly on the tablet and interactive boards using large letters and numbers. Where possible, avoid using the blackboard or whiteboard. Distance students often have difficulty reading information written on a blackboard or whiteboard as recordings do not capture it well.
  • Take after class discussions with students into the hallway so that staff can properly prepare the studio for the next class.

For Successful Distance Student Engagement:

  • When you get questions from your in-class students, repeat or rephrase the question prior to responding to ensure that all students have heard the question and that it is captured on the recording.
  • Solicit the participation of the distance education students. Encourage their questions for discussion in the next class period.
  • Remember to make eye contact with your distance students as well by looking directly at the mid-room or rear camera. Treat that camera as another student in the classroom; it represents all your distance education students.
  • Keep distance education students informed about deadlines. Remind them of the delay (one week typically; sometimes longer for international or hard-to-reach areas) for media/exam delivery. Desire2Learn (D2L)/Canvas can be used to carry out these responsibilities.

For Preparing Visuals:

  • Text should be clear and succinct.
  • Excess jargon or verbosity usually does not aid effective communication.
  • Leave plenty of white (unused) space.
  • If a single graph, diagram or text slide has too much information, understanding drops off. Research shows that the mind identifies and recalls up to six items fairly easily. After that, comprehension and recall rates reduce drastically.
  • Optimum: 6 words per line and 4 to 7 lines of text for each visual.
  • Select a simple, bold typestyle.
  • Arial, Verdana, Tahoma, Franklin or other sans serif font is twice as easy to read on computer and TV screens as Times Roman or other serif font. Bold, italicize or color important words.
  • Type size: letters at 1/4" high (24 point).
  • Use one typestyle in three or fewer sizes throughout a presentation, with the largest type size for titles or main headings.
  • Use both upper and lower case letters—a mixture of upper and lower case is easier to read.
  • Color—good color contrast improves readability. Do not use dark ink on a dark background.
  • Use bullets to emphasize items on a list—no more than 8 bullets per page.
  • Use landscape layout.
  • A horizontal format accommodates the bias of the TV screen and projected image in class. Use a 3:4 ratio of height to width, e.g. 6" x 8" or 9" x 12."
  • Test legibility before showing your visuals.
  • Prepare your text on an 81/2" x 11" piece of paper. Put it on the floor and stand up so that the paper is between your feet. Can you read it from this position? That’s how big it will look on the screen (assuming you are 5 to 6 feet tall).
  • If a visual will be shown more than once during a presentation, make more than one copy—this will eliminate searching back and forth for a specific visual.
  • Point to key features of your graphic as you discuss them.
  • Take time with your visuals. Give your students a few moments to absorb what you are showing, and to take notes. Some instructors provide handouts of the slides prior to class, or instruct the students to print them out and bring them to class before a specific lecture.