Below is more information about the shows in the Astronomy 6 Showcase:

Dark Universe

Dark Universe still image from film.

The American Museum of Natural History’s latest space show celebrates a new age of cosmic discovery as well as its deepest mysteries. Dark Universe features spectacular scenes of recent spacecraft, such as the Galileo probe’s breathtaking plunge into Jupiter’s atmosphere, the most accurate visualizations ever produced, such as a Milky Way galaxy spangled with exploding supernovas, and novel renderings of hotly discussed phenomena, like dark matter.  (runtime 26 minutes)

Incoming

Incoming still image from film.

From the comfort of a planetarium seat, viewers will embark on a dynamic journey on the trail of asteroids and comets, get an up close look at the advanced technologies that allow scientists to detect asteroids before they reach Earth, and visualize historic space events billions of years in the making—all within an immersive, all-digital dome that brings the captivating story of our cosmic origins to life like never before. Narrated by George Takei, Incoming! explores the past, present, and future of our Solar System and the landmark discoveries scientists have made by sending spacecraft to visit tiny worlds. (runtime 22 minutes)

Life Under The Arctic Sky

Life Under Arctic Sky

Two hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle, near the jagged tips of Norway’s crown, the sun does not set for weeks on end during the summer months, and the midnight sun bounces off fields of midsummer snow. Sami herders call their work boazovázzi, which translates as “reindeer walker,” and that’s exactly what herders once did, following the fast-paced animals on foot or wooden skis as they sought out the best grazing grounds over hundreds of miles of terrain. An aurora borealis is a natural light display in the sky, especially in the high latitude regions, caused by the collision of solar wind and magnetospheric charged particles with the high altitude atmosphere. The Finnish name for the northern lights “revontulet” is associated with the arctic fox. According to a folk tale, moonlight is reflected from the snowflakes swept up into the sky by the fox’s tail.