Courses taught by Robert Kaufman, the fifth Visiting Scholar in Conservative Thought and Policy (2017-2018)

Spring 2018

The Post-Cold War World: US Strategies/World Politics

IAFS 4500
MoWe: 3:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
HALE 236
Description: Capstone course for international affairs majors. Examines the ways in which the end of the Cold War, the collapse of failed states, and the rise of global terrorism changed the world. Studies how peoples, governments and nongovernmental organizations face new social, political, economic and security challenges in an era of globalization. Includes discussion, oral reports, critical book reviews, and research papers. Restricted to students with 87-180 credits (Senior) International Affairs (IAFS) majors only. Auditors allowed. 

War, Peace, and Strategic Defense

PSCI 3123. This class will be team-taught with Prof. Aysegul Aydin, CWCTP Faculty Fellow
Tues & Thurs: 2:00 p.m. -3:15 p.m.
HUMN 135
Description: Analyzes employment, or the threat of employing force, in securing American interests in the post-Cold War world. Gives special attention to utilities claimed for nuclear weapons, and alternatively, to weapons control and disarmament. Recommended prerequisite: PSCI 2223. Similar to PACS 3800.  Auditors allowed.

Courses taught by Other CWCTP Scholars

Spring 2018

The Western Tradition

CWCV 2000: This class will be taught by Bradley Scholar, Benjamin Bryan
MoWeFr: 2:00 p.m. -2:50 p.m.
KTCH 1B74
Description: Encourages a historical and critical investigation into the formative influences on what is often called Western culture, including religious, political, social and economic factors, and contemporary interpretations and critiques of these developments and concepts. Designed as the foundation course for the Center for Western Civilization. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

Philosophy and Law

PHIL 2220: This class will be taught by CWCTP Freedom and Security Scolar, Isaac Taylor
MoWeFr: 12:00 p.m. -12:50 p.m.
RAMY N1B31
Description: Considers philosophical issues related to law in general and the U.S. system in particular. Topics to be covered may address such questions as the following: What is the nature of law? What kinds of acts should the law prohibit (e.g., abortion, drug use, pornography, cloning)? Is there a moral obligation to obey the law? Can civil disobedience be justified? Is there a justification for punishing people for breaking the law? Is capital punishment, in particular, morally justified?

HOW TO REGISTER

Classes start Monday, Tuesday, January 16, 2018.


Fall 2017 

Special Topics: Prudence and the Art of Statesmanship
PSCI 2028
MoWeFr: 10:00 a.m - 10:50 a.m.
MUEN E417
Description: This course will use Aristotle's and Thomas Aquinas's notion of prudence as a point of departure for assessing statesmanship or the lack of it. The course will begin with theoretical readings, then delve into applying these principles to case studies spanning the centuries ---- from Pericles to President Obama. The case studies will include unbridled successes, tragic failures, and controversial statesmen who fall in between. The course strives to instill in the student the capacity to practice prudence as well as the ability as a voter to distinguish the prudent for the imprudent --- rightly understood. The course will conclude with a preliminary mediation of how Donald Trump ranks in the pantheon of prudence.

Modern Warfare: Terrorism, Ideology, Identity 
PSCI 4243
MoWeFr: 12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m.
CLUB 13
Description: Explores the evolution of warfare and origins of terrorism. Ideological and identity differences have come to the forefront of violent political conflicts while the emerging doctrine of warfare has placed civilians in the middle of modern conflicts. Tracks potential changes in the means of and reasons for fighting, roles of civilians and media, and rules of war. 


ARCHIVE

Courses taught by Francis Beckwith, the fourth Visiting Scholar in Conservative Thought and Policy (2016-2017)

Spring 2017  

Philosophy of Religion
PHIL 1600
Tues & Thurs: 8:00 a.m - 9:15 p.m.
HLMS 229

Special Topics: Religion and the Constitution
PSCI 2028
Tues & Thurs: 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 p.m.
KTCH 1B87

For more information about these courses, please read Francis Beckwith's blog post.

Fall 2016

Philosophy of Religion
PHIL 1600
Tues & Thurs: 8 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Guggenheim 206

Thomas Aquinas
(co-taught with Robert Pasnau)
PHIL 4010
Tues & Thurs: 11 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Hellems 237

Courses taught by Brian Domitrovic, the third Visiting Scholar in Conservative Thought and Policy (2015-2016)

Spring 2016

Philosophy and Society
(co-taught with Professor Adam Hosein)
PHIL 1200-003 
Tues & Thurs: 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
VAC 1B90 (Visual Arts Complex)

Topics in U.S. Economic History
HONR 4000-881
Tues & Thurs: 5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.
Norlin Library M300D

    Fall 2015

    The Western Tradition
    CWCV 2000
    MoWeFr: 2:00PM – 2:50PM
    DUAN G2B41
    Description: This course encourages a historical and critical investigation into the formative influences on what is often called Western culture, including religious, political, social and economic factors, and contemporary interpretations and critiques of these developments and concepts. Designed as the foundation course for the Center for Western Civilization.

    Economic History of the United States
    ECON 4524 
    MoWeFr: 1:00PM – 1:50PM
    CLUB4
    Description: This course covers the evolution of modern economic growth and development in the U.S. from colonial times to the present emphasizing institutional change. Prereq., ECON 3070