Published: June 21, 2017

Freedom and Security Courses: Fall 2017

Robert Kaufman

Special Topics: Prudence and the Art of Statesmanship
PSCI 2028
MoWeFr: 10:00 a.m - 10:50 a.m.
MUEN E417
Description: This course will use Aristotle's and Thomas Aquinas's notion of prudence as a point of departure for assessing statesmanship or the lack of it. The course will begin with theoretical readings, then delve into applying these principles to case studies spanning the centuries ---- from Pericles to President Obama. The case studies will include unbridled successes, tragic failures, and controversial statesmen who fall in between. The course strives to instill in the student the capacity to practice prudence as well as the ability as a voter to distinguish the prudent for the imprudent --- rightly understood. The course will conclude with a preliminary mediation of how Donald Trump ranks in the pantheon of prudence.

Modern Warfare: Terrorism, Ideology, Identity 
PSCI 4243
MoWeFr: 12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m.
CLUB13
Description: This course explores the evolution of warfare and origins of terrorism. Ideological and identity differences have come to the forefront of violent political conflicts while the emerging doctrine of warfare has placed civilians in the middle of modern conflicts. Tracks potential changes in the means of and reasons for fighting, roles of civilians and media, and rules of war. Prereq., PSCI 2223. Recommended prereq., PSCI 3193. Prerequisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.


Johanna Gosse

Waiting to be Seen, Surveillance, Voyeurism, Cinema
ARTH 4929
Class: We 11:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m., Screenings: Tues 4:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Class: VAC 455, Screenings: ATLAS 102
Description:  Traversing a broad field of surveillance visual culture, from classical Hollywood to avant-garde cinema, conceptual photography to video installation, tactical media activism to selfies, class discussion will be anchored by critical texts by theorists such as Michel Foucault, Laura Mulvey, Jean Baudrillard, Gilles Deleuze, and Peter Singer; writers like Franz Kafka and Friedrich Dürrenmatt; surveillance scholars like Kelly Gates and Simone Brown, and writings by film-makers and artists. Throughout the semester, we will consider how experimental and artistic uses of surveillance, as both technology and dispositif, intersect with, challenge, or affirm the function of surveillance as an ideological and biopolitical technique. In particular, we will question whether the critical analysis of visual culture illuminates or recapitulates the constitutive role of surveillance in the discursive construction of gender, sexuality, race, citizenship, and national security.

Black Mountain Experimentalism
ARTH 6929
Tues 4:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
VAC 485
Description: Black Mountain College was a profoundly influential yet short-lived experiment in interdisciplinary education located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. Founded in 1933 in the midst of the Great Depression, the College opened with scarce resources, low enrollments, and no required courses or majors. In order to survive, the community adopted a democratic ethos in which faculty and students alike were responsible for maintaining day-to- day operations, from the construction and maintenance of the grounds to institutional governance. Likewise, the curriculum was guided by the pedgagogical principle of “learning by doing,” a central tenet of American philosopher John Dewey’s theory of the progressive education. Dozens of significant artists, poets, and musicians attended or taught at the school before it closed in 1957, including Josef and Anni Albers, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, David Tudor, Buckminster Fuller, Elaine and Willem de Kooning, Ruth Asawa, Stan VanDerBeek, Ray Johnson, Cy Twombly, Leroi Jones (Amiri Baraka), Susan Weil, Robert Motherwell, Jacob Lawrence, Charles Olson, Robert Rauschenberg, and M.C. Richards. Hence, it would be difficult to overstate the influence of Black Mountain on postwar American culture. This class will focus on two key dimensions of the College’s legacy: first, its profound impact on postwar American visual, performing, and applied arts; and second, its defining commitment to “experimentation,” in terms of both teaching and artistic practice, an approach that was rooted in Dewey’s Pragmatist philosophy. By focusing on these two lines of inquiry, this class will aim to clarify, on the one hand, the stakes of the College’s curricular and cultural emphasis on experimentation and experience, and on the other, the tremendous impact of this approach on postwar American art.


Isaac Taylor

The Western Tradition
CWCV 2000
Tues & Thurs 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
GUGG 2
Description: CWCV 2000 is our core course on the Western Tradition. It encourages a historical and critical investigation into the formative influences on what is often called Western culture, including religious, political, social and economic factors, and contemporary interpretations and critiques of these developments and concepts.

Benjamin Bryan

The Western Tradition
CWCV 2000
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m. 
CLRE 211
Description: CWCV 2000 is our core course on the Western Tradition. It encourages a historical and critical investigation into the formative influences on what is often called Western culture, including religious, political, social and economic factors, and contemporary interpretations and critiques of these developments and concepts.


Robert Pasnau

Topic: Why be Moral?*
FYSM 1000
We 5:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
HLMS 104

*This is a Freshman seminar and cannot be audited