All Classics courses (CLAS, GREK, LATN), as well as classes cross-listed with CLAS, count towards the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S) General Education (Gen Ed): Arts and Humanities requirement. Further information about other Gen Ed requirements fulfilled by specific courses or groups of courses is given below and on the relevant related web pages.

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General Education Requirements
Core Curriculum
What We Teach

A. General Education Requirements


All students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in the College of Arts and Sciences who enter the college in the fall of 2018 or thereafter must complete the new General Education requirements. Students who entered the college before the fall 2018 have the option of completing either the new General Education requirements OR the old Core Curriculum.

Students planning to complete the Core Curriculum requirements should skip down to section B.

1.  Skills requirement

  • Foreign language requirement:  The attainment of 3rd level proficiency in either Greek (GREK 1013, GREK 1023, GREK 3113) or Latin (LATN 1014, LATN 1024, LATN 2004, LATN 2044, LATN 2114) meets the foreign language requirement. If the foreign language requirement is complete, the same courses fulfull the Gen Ed Arts & Humanities Distribution Requirement.
  • Written communication requirement:  CLAS 1020, “Argument from Evidence: Critical Writing about the Ancient World” fulfills the lower-division Written Communication requirement.

2.  Distribution requirement

All Classics courses (CLAS, GREK, LATN), as well as classes cross-listed with CLAS, count towards the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S) General Education (Gen Ed): Arts and Humanities requirement. Some can also count towards the Social Sciences requirement:

  • CLAS/LING 1010: The Study of Words
  • CLAS/ANTH 3119: The Archaeology of Death

3.  Diversity requirement

The following courses count towards the “Global perspective” diversity requirement:

  • CLAS/ARTH 1509: Trash and Treasure, Temples and Tombs: Art and Archaeology of the Ancient World
  • CLAS/WGST 2100, Sex and Gender in Ancient Greece
  • CLAS/WGST 2110: Sex and Gender in Ancient Rome
  • CLAS/ARTH 2029: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt
  • CLAS 4101: Greek and Roman Slavery
  • CLAS/ARTH 4269: Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East

 

B. Core Curriculum


1.  Foreign Language

As with other foreign languages, the attainment of 3rd level proficiency in either Greek or Latin meets the foreign language requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences.

2.  Content Areas of Study

The following is a list of Classics courses that meet Content Area requirements of the Core Curriculum.

Historical Context

  • CLAS 1030/PHIL 1010: Introduction to Western Philosophy: Ancient
  • CLAS/HIST 1051: The World of the Ancient Greeks
  • CLAS/HIST 1061: The Rise and Fall of Ancient Rome
  • CLAS 1140: Bread and Circuses: Society and Culture in the Roman World
  • CLAS/ARTH 1509: Trash and Treasure, Temples and Tombs: Art and Archaeology of the Ancient World
  • CLAS/ANTH 3009: Modern Issues, Ancient Times
  • CLAS/ARTH 3019: Pompeii and the Cities of Vesuvius
  • CLAS/ANTH 3119: Archaeology of Death

Diversity

  • CLAS/ARTH 2029: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt
  • CLAS/WGST 2100: Sex and Gender in Ancient Greece
  • CLAS/WGST 2110: Sex and Gender in Ancient Rome
  • CLAS/ARTH 4269: Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East

Literature and the Arts

  • CLAS 1100: Greek and Roman Mythology
  • CLAS 1110: Gods, Monsters and Mortals: Literature of Ancient Greece
  • CLAS 1115: Masterpieces of Greek Literature in Translation
  • CLAS 1120: Power and Passion in Ancient Rome
  • CLAS/ARTH 1509: Trash and Treasure, Temples and Tombs: Arts and Archaeology of the Ancient World
  • CLAS/ARTH 2039: Greek Art and Archaeology
  • CLAS/ARTH 2049: Introduction to Roman Art and Architecture
  • CLAS/HUMN 4110: Greek and Roman Epic
  • CLAS/HUMN 4120: Greek and Roman Tragedy
  • CLAS/HUMN 4130: Greek and Roman Comedy

Ideals and Values

  • CLAS 2610: Paganism to Christianity

 

What We Teach


Ancient Greece and Rome: Literature, Culture, Thought; History; Art and Archaeology

The Department offers a broad range of courses in these areas, which require no knowledge of Greek or Latin. Many of these can be taken to satisfy Content Area requirements of the Core Curriculum (see B above); any of these courses can be taken out of intellectual curiosity and to fulfill the Gen Ed Arts & Humanities requirement, as well as a variety of other Gen Ed requirements (see A above). Many are cross-listed with the Departments of History, Philosophy, Humanities, Art and Art History, Anthropology or Women's Studies. Some of these cross-listed courses are taught by faculty members in those departments. Consult the Registration Handbook or ask a member of the department for further information about offerings that might interest you.

Greek and Latin Language and Literature

Advanced graduate students with training in instruction teach some of our elementary Latin and Greek and intermediate Latin courses with the guidance of faculty members; all other courses, including intermediate Greek and advanced Latin, are taught by professors. There are no language labs. Elementary and intermediate courses are not 'baby' courses: already at the end of the second semester of beginning Greek or Latin you will be reading Plato or Caesar in the original, and at the intermediate level you will be able to read Homer or Virgil. Elementary course enrollments range from 10-25; classes beyond the intermediate level usually have fewer students. Our relatively small numbers mean that you will always be able to obtain individual attention from professors and teaching assistants. Our programs in Greek and Latin give students a breadth of knowledge that begins with the intensive study of grammar and expands to the literary examination of texts and inquiry into the cultural contexts of ancient Greek and Latin literature.

The sequence of introductory courses in ancient Greek is as follows:

  • GREK 1013-1023: Beginning Classical Greek 1 and 2. This is the introductory language course taught in two semesters.
  • GREK 3113-3123: Intermediate Classical Greek 1 and 2. The second year of the language sequence concentrates on the reading of ancient texts, such as Plato or Euripides, in the original language. Note that it carries Upper Division credit.

The sequence of introductory courses in Latin is similar:

  • LATN 1014-1024: Beginning Latin 1 and 2. This is the introductory language course taught in two semesters.
  • LATN 2114-2124: Intermediate Latin 1 and 2. The second year of the language sequence concentrates on the reading of ancient texts, such as Caesar or Virgil, in the original language.

At the 3000 and 4000 level the Department offers advanced literature courses with annually changing subject matter, so that students will have a chance to read as many representative authors as possible. You may repeat 3014, 3024, 4013, 4014, 4023 and 4044 up to two times (for a total of nine credits) provided that the same author is not taught under the same rubric. You may repeat 3113 and 3123 one time (for a total of six credits) provided that the same author is not taught under the same rubric (i.e., you could receive separate credit for GREK 3123 Euripides and GREK 3123 Homer, but not for Euripides twice). Qualified undergraduates may also obtain permission to enroll in advanced Greek and Latin courses listed only at the graduate level. If you are interested, consult with the instructor for the graduate-level course you would like to take.

LATN 2114 and above and GREK 3113 and above count for credit toward completion of the major or minor.

Independent Study

As your studies become more advanced, you may find that Independent Study best suits your academic needs. Guidelines and a form for requesting Independent Study are available in the Department office and from the Undergraduate Faculty Advisor.