Assistant Professor
Ethnic Studies

Education

PhD: University of California, Berkeley; Ethnic Studies, 2008. 
MA: University of California, Berkeley; Ethnic Studies, 2003.
BA: University of Massachusetts, Amherst; East Asian Languages and Literatures (Japanese), 1998
CJS: Nanzan University 南山大学 Nagoya, Japan; Certificate of Japanese Studies, 1997.

Research Interests

Native histories; Indigenous feminisms; comparative ethnic studies; race and representation; visual and material culture; national memory; haunting and the trace; transnational movement of American colonial ideologies–particularly in the case of Japan; historical silences; Indigenous and intersectional futurisms.

Regional and Thematic Interests

East Asia
Transnational & Colonial Studies

Selected Publications

In Preparation: Book length manuscript "Specters of Colonialism: Native Peoples, Visual Culture and Colonial Projects in the U.S. and Japan (1860-1904)" under contract with University of Minnesota Press, currently out for second round of review publication anticipated Fall 2018/Spring 2019.

2017  “Coming to you from the Indigenous Future: Native Women, Speculative Film Shorts, and the Art of the Possible” in Studies in American Indian Literatures. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press; 29(1) 2017: 139-171.

2015 “Empire’s Haunted Logics: Comparative Colonialisms and the Challenges of Incorporating Indigeneity” in a special issue titled “The Perils and Possibilities of Comparative Work,” the Journal of Critical Ethnic Studies.Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press; 1(2) 2015: 11-32.

2015 “Racial Comparativism Reconsidered” Special Issue introduction, co-authored with Antonio T. Tiongson, Jr. for the Journal of Critical Ethnic Studies. Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota Press; 1(2) 2015: 1-7.

2012 “Transnational Indigenous Exchange: Rethinking Global Interactions of Indigenous Peoples at the 1904 St. Louis Exposition ”American Quarterly, 62(3) Alternative Contact: Indigeneity, Globalism, and American Studies (September 2010): 591-615. Awarded “Most Thought-Provoking Article in Native American and Indigenous Studies” for an article published in 2010 by the Native American and Indigenous Studies Assoc. June, 2012.