Fall 2017

Fall 2017 Ethnography in Progress Series

October 27: Contentious Bodies: The Place, Race, and Gender of Victimhood | 3 p.m., Hale 450
by Dani Merriman (PhD Candidate, Cultural Anthropology)
Discussant: Bailey Duhé (PhD Student, Cultural Anthropology)

This is the third chapter of my dissertation. I address the ways in which Afro-Colombians in the region of María la Baja, Colombia re-signify their “contentious bodies” amidst parallel peace and war efforts. In the context of over 60 years of war, the government and armed paramilitary forces continue to frame Afro-Colombian campesinos(rural farmers) as both “innocent victims” and “guerrilla combatants." Given legacies of racialized marginalization, how do Afro-Colombian communities stake claims to lost land and violent pasts when their very bodies are presumed to challenge their innocence? I illustrate how individuals use their “contentious bodies” to resist militant and bureaucratic attempts to label them as perpetrators of violence. Afro-Colombian farmers enact embodied evidence, such as calloused farming hands, dark complexions, and scars, to assert their dignity and victimization. Through these corporeal and visual self-assertions, I examine the ways in which intersectional signifiers, are simultaneously read and performed within the context of war and peacetime violence.

November 10: Workshopping Successful NSF Grants | 2 p.m., Hale 450
Jerry Jacka (Associate Professor, Cultural Anthropology)

What makes a successful NSF grant work? In this session we will read two grants for projects in cultural anthropology that were successfully funded by the National Science Foundation. We will analyze how and why these grants were compelling and steps that students and faculty can take to create funded research proposals.

 

Fall 2017 Brown Bag Schedule, 12pm Hale Science Building Reading Room 450.
Wednesday, October 18: Lauren Barrett
“On Borders, Boundaries, and Transgression in Anthropology” REDUX for the AAA
Brown Bag - Barrett

Please join us for a brown bag meeting to discuss the conference that was held in September. The goal of the brown bag is to help students further workshop and professionalize their presentations as they look forward to conferences such as the AAA’s.  If you are a student who gave a presentation, please come ready to discuss two things that you did well, as well as one thing that you would like to improve upon. Similarly, if you are a graduate student or faculty member who attended the conference, please come with constructive feedback in mind.  If you have any questions please contact Lauren Barrett at lauren.barrett@colorado.edu

 

Local "Theory" of mind and why it matters
Professor Tanya Luhrmann, Watkins University Professor, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University
4pm, Friday, October 13 in Hale 230

Tanya Lurhmann

Coffee & Donuts with Anthropology Professor Douglas Bamforth
ANTH Majors & Minors are invited to drop by for some coffee talk.  Everyone welcome!
Tuesday, October 10 from 9:00-10:30am in Hale 450

Coffee with Faculty

From the Flatirons to the Yellow Border: a primatologist's path outside academia
Dr. Catherine Workman, Senior Director of Wildlife and Wild Places for the National Geographic Society
4pm, Friday, October 6 in Hale 230

Catherine Workman

The Center for Documentary and Ethnographic Media Presents: An Art and Anthropology Colloquium
Thursday and Friday, October 5 - 6 in Hale 450

October 5
Curatorial Workshop* with members of the Ethnographic Terminalia Collective, Craig Campbell and Fiona P. McDonald
2:00pm-5:00pm in Hale 450

Film screening and Q&A with filmmaker and anthropologist J.P. Sniadecki
J.P. Sniadecki will then screen his new film El mar la mar (2017)
7:30pm in Muenzinger Auditorium

October 6
Presentations and Discussions
Ethnographic Terminalia Collective: Collaborative Curating, presented by Craig Campbell and Fiona P. McDonald

Discussion with Craig Campbell, Fiona P. McDonald, J.P. Sniadecki and Stephanie Spray
2:00pm-4:00pm in Hale 450

*Space in the workshop is limited. Email Christian Hammons to insure participation, or if you have any questions.

Ethnographic Terminalia Event

 

Borders: a conference on boundaries, barriers ​and transgression in anthropology (2017)
Cultural anthropology graduate students, Anthropology Department, University of Colorado Boulder
Friday and Saturday, September 29 - 30 in Hale 450

Graduate Conference 2017

Soldiers & Kings: Photoethnographic Practice in the Context of Smuggling across Mexico
Dr. Jason de León Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
4pm, Friday, September 29 in Hale 230

Jason de Leon

The cultural anthropology graduate students at the University of Colorado, Boulder are pleased to announce our seventh annual graduate student conference, titled Borders: On Boundaries, Barriers, and Transgression in Anthropology. We look forward to building connections across universities - come join us!
 
Borders is a two-day conference organized by graduate students in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Events are free and open to the public. The conference will be held Friday, September 29 and Saturday, September 30, 2017 and will include panels moderated by University of Colorado faculty. Dr. Jason de León (Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) will give the keynote address in Hale 230 4pm, Friday, September 29.
 
Graduate student conferences are planned, organized, and presented by graduate students in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. They are two-day interdisciplinary conferences with a wide range of global topics. They are attended by professionals and students from both inside and outside the university.

 

Paramilitary Politics in Colombia
Dr. Winifred Tate, Department of Anthropology, Colby College
4pm, Friday, September 22 in Hale 230

Winifred Tate

Abstract: “The judgment of history will recognize the goodness and nobility of our cause,” indicted drug trafficker and paramilitary leader Salvatore Mancuso told assembled legislators in the Colombian Congress in 2004. This talk examines the social life of this claim, considering the origins of paramilitary violence, the production of history about this violence, and its legacies in contemporary Colombian politics. Rather than being the result of state absence, I argue contemporary forms of Colombian paramilitarism emerged from settler colonialism throughout the early years of the 20th century. Popular histories of these groups, including elite oral histories and narconovela television dramas, portray paramilitaries as heroic saviors who won the country’s counterinsurgency war. I conclude by tracing the resonance of these claims in emergent violence in opposition to state-sponsored land restitution programs and current peace talks with the guerrillas.

 

Mimbres at the Museum: Earl, Hugo, Anna and Me
Dr. Steve Lekson, Curator and Professor of Archaeology, University of Colorado Boulder
7pm, Tuesday, September 19 in Hale 270

Mibres bowl

The 11th century Mimbres culture of New Mexico is famous for its ceramic art: black-and-white images of animals and people painted on simple earthenware pots.  In 1925, the CU Museum acquired a large collection of Mimbres pottery when Junius Henderson (the first Director of the Museum) asked archaeologist Earl Morris to excavate Mimbres sites.  Anna Shepard was a ceramic analyst who worked with Earl Morris.  She was fascinated by the formal symmetries of Mimbres art, and the Museum has her papers and laboratory notes.  Hugo Rodeck (who followed Henderson as Director) was smitten with Mimbres art.  In the 1960s he assembled an incredible archive of Mimbres images – now part of the CU Museum's holdings.  Steve Lekson (Curator of Archaeology) has done extensive fieldwork in the Mimbres region.  In the CU Museum's collections, he discovered many strange and wonderful Mimbres things.  This talk tells the stories of Mimbres at the Museum – along with insights and ideas about the ancient Mimbres people and their pottery.

Steve Lekson (Ph.D. University of New Mexico) is Curator of Archaeology and Professor of Anthropology at the Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado, Boulder. He held research, curatorial, and administrative positions with University of Tennessee, Eastern New Mexico University, National Park Service, Arizona State Museum, Museum of New Mexico, and Crow Canyon Archaeological Center. Lekson directed more than 20 archaeological projects throughout the Southwest. Recent projects include excavations at Pinnacle Ruin in central New Mexico (2000-2008), excavations at Chimney Rock in southern Colorado (2009), and excavations at Black Mountain and Woodrow ruins in southwestern New Mexico (2010-13). He is currently Contributing Editor for Archaeology magazine.

 

Ancient Settlement Pattern Changes in Coastal Oaxaca, Mexico
Jessica D. Hedgepeth Balkin – Anthropology PhD student, University of Colorado Boulder
7pm,Thursday, September 14 at the CU Museum, Dinosaur Room
(RVSP) to Indian Peaks Chapter of the Colorado Archaeological Society

Abstract: Between the Early and Late Formative periods (1800-150 BCE), major landscape changes occurred in the lower Río Verde Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico. Highly productive ecological niches developed due to floodplain expansion and the formation of resource-rich estuaries. To investigate how prehispanic settlement pattering in the lower Verde region was affected by shifts in resource availability, I conducted an interdisciplinary dissertation study from January-June of 2016. The Río Verde Settlement Project (RVSP) included a continuation of the regional archaeological survey as well as a systematic soil sampling program to examine variation in soil fertility. This presentation provides details on the project methodology and presents preliminary conclusions on changes in settlement ecology after the environmental changes took place (c.a. 150 BCE). The project results include promising information for answering two major research questions. First, did settlement concentrate around the floodplain and estuaries after they formed? Second, if people did indeed congregate in these resource-rich areas, was there a time lag between the ecological changes and settlement shifts?

The final portion of the presentation will discuss promising future research applications of my dissertation data related to settlement scaling theory. Ortman and colleagues argue that settled area and population density are linked mathematically in settlements around the world (e.g., the ancient Andes and the Basin of Mexico) Do lower Verde settlements exhibit similar properties?

 

Dispossession and Disappearance in the Post Sovereign Pacific: Climate, Change, and our Anthropocentric Future, Department Colloquim
Paige West, Claire Tow Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College, Columbia University
4pm, Friday, September 8 in Hale 230

Paige West
Abstract: On July 19, 2013 the Prime Ministers of Australia and Papua New Guinea agreed to the Regional Resettlement Arrangement between Australia and Papua New Guinea (colloquially known as “The Papua New Guinea Solution” or the RRA) an international agreement that diverts asylum seekers who attempt to reach Australia by boat to Papua New Guinea, for immediate detention and processing, and then eventual resettlement in Papua New Guinea - a country that did not have a national refugee policy until October 2015. In this talk, the author will describe the lives of the people who have been affected by the RRA ethnographically, placing their lives within the larger story of the RRA. The talk will end with some questions for all of us, as anthropologists, about how we are to approach the socio-ecological present today as scholars and as humans, and about the value of ethnographic anthropology, something that has recently been loudly critiqued and roundly discounted by some of the more irritating members of our discipline.

  • Captives: Stolen People in the Ancient World - Dr. Catherine M. Cameron
    Monday May 8 from 7:00-8:30pm at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Ricketson Auditorium

    Captives were remarkably common in ancient times. Societies of all levels of complexity took captives, most commonly women and children. Archaeologists largely overlook captives as social actors, yet captives almost certainly transformed many of the societies they unwillingly joined. Captives were important sources of social and economic power for their captors, even in small-scale societies. Using cross-cultural comparison and analogy I will explore the substantial impacts captives had on captor society. I emphasize that the presence of captives should disabuse archaeologists of ever imagining that small-scale societies were “egalitarian” and suggest ways we can investigate links between captives and power.
    Colorado Archaeological Society’s Denver Chapter

  • Sex, Society and the Patriarchal Tendency, Department Colloquium.
    Eric C Thompson Associate Professor, Dept of Sociology, National University of Singapore
    4pm, Friday, April 28 in Hale 230
    Eric Thompson
    Abstract
    In this talk, I will discuss the following thesis: (hetero)sexual exchange dynamics of human reproduction are a key factor in explaining the patriarchal tendency of human societies. The patriarchal tendency refers to the fact that all recorded human societies occupy a spectrum from the more-or-less gender egalitarian to the decidedly patriarchal. The book, on which this presentation is based, is an attempt to explain why human societies fall within this range (and the corollary absence of matriarchal societies). The presentation will focus on three elements of the argument: (1) an overview of the patriarchal tendency, (2) why I position sexual exchange as a central explanation of the tendency, and (3) the consequences of a sexual exchange theory of the patriarchal tendency. In particular, I discuss the implications of my arguments for the liberal-individualist assumptions of contemporary feminist and gender theory. Furthermore, I propose that the goals of gender egalitarianism (gender equality) may be better served by drawing on models of actually existing gender egalitarian societies (e.g. those with matrilineal bias in inheritance) than on the abstract model of liberal-individualism.


    Eric Thompson
    Eric C Thompson is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the National University of Singapore. Before joining NUS, he completed a PhD in sociocultural anthropology at the University of Washington and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, University of California Los Angeles. He teaches anthropology, gender studies, urban studies and research methods. His research spans field sites across Southeast Asia, particularly Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. His research interests include transnational networking, urbanism, agrarian transitions, and ASEAN regionalism. His work has appeared in the journals American Ethnologist, Current Anthropology, Urban Studies, Political Geography, Asian Studies Review, Contemporary Sociology, and Contemporary Southeast Asian Studies among others.
    He is author of Unsettling Absences: Urbanism in Rural Malaysia (NUS Press, 2007). He is co-editor of Cleavage, Connection and Conflict in Rural, Urban, and Contemporary Asia (Springer, 2012).
  • Spring 2017 Ethnography in Progress Series

    April 27: "Bad Blood" | 4 p.m., Hale 455

    by Allison Formanack (PhD Candidate, Cultural Anthropology)

    Discussant: Drew Zachary (PhD Student, Cultural Anthropology)

    American cultural stereotypes consider “white trash” and “trailer trash,” both pejorative phrases, as synonymous; that is, “trailer trash” serves as a representational form of “white trash.” This under-examined notion is often reproduced in social science research on the interrelationship of housing, class, and place-based identities (e.g. Desmond 2016, Hartigan 2005, Isenburg 2016, McCarty 2010, Moss 2003). Operated as private businesses, informal (not to mention, illegal) racial discrimination practices existed in most “trailer parks” well into the 1980s, thus cementing both the parks’ class- and race-based associations for residents and the wider public. However, this same business model promising cheap housing with fewer regulations and scrutiny has made mobile homes a popular choice among newly-arrived immigrants, in particular Mexicans and Central Americans, since the 1990s (Hiemstra 2010, Kusenbach 2015, Nelson & Hiemstra 2008). As such, despite the continued use of “white/trailer trash” in popular discourse, in practice mobile home communities (MHCs) often have the most racial/ethnic diversity within a given region. In this dissertation chapter, I draw on ethnographic data collected in Crown Court MHC, located near downtown Lincoln, Nebraska, to examine the interconnections between demographic transition and racialized notions of place and belonging within a stigmatized space, the “trailer park.” Here, I consider how residents interpreted demographic and sensorial (alternatively, affective) changes in Crown Court relative to the persistent stigmas of being either “white trash” or “trailer trash.” Moreover, I show how being named “trailer trash” differently affects white and Latino/a residents, which reveals a discursive gap between this concept and “white trash.” Exploring both the conceptual overlap and distinctiveness of “white trash” and “trailer trash,” I argue, illustrates how certain unstable (or ambiguous, amorphous, placeless) identities are negotiated, contested, and materialized in specific places.

  • AIA Lecture: From the Ashes: The Lost History of Aztec Ruins

    Wednesday April 26 from 7:00-8:30pm at the CU Museum of Natural History

    AIA Lecture
    Erin Baxter (PhD ’16) presents how recent research into Morris’ museum archive is radicalizing our views of Aztec. We now know it as the once-capital of Southwestern civilization which rose and fell in an explosion of political upheaval, aberrant behavior, violence and fire. This talk will explore unpublished diaries, letters, photos, and maps that give tantalizing clues to Aztec’s complex history and reveals the emergence of social inequality, the role of violence and conflict, and the development of larger scales of political organization during one of the most important chapters in Ancestral Pueblo history.

  • Ethnography. Not Just Another Qualitative Method
    A faculty-graduate student seminar, Agenda
    Friday, April 21 9am - 3:30pm Hale Science Building, 4th Floor
    Ethnography Not Just Another Qualitative Method
  • Coffee & Donuts with Anthropology Professors Carla Jones & Joanna Lambert
    ANTH Majors & Minors are invited to drop by for some coffee talk.  Everyone welcome!
    Wednesday, April 12 from 9:00-11:00am in Hale 450
    Coffee and Donuts
  • Troubling Time/s and Ecologies of Nothingness: Re-turning, Re-membering, and Facing the Incalculable, Department Colloquium.
    Karen Barad Professor of Feminist Studies, Philosophy, and History of Consciousness University of California at Santa Cruz
    4pm, Friday, April 7 in Hale 270, Reception to follow
     

    Karan Barad

    In this public talk, Karen Barad diffractively reads insights from quantum theory and Kyoko Hayashi’s first-hand accounts of Nagasaki bombing through one another, bringing to the fore a troubling of scalar distinctions between the world of subatomic particles and that of colonialism, war, and environmental destruction. Attempting to think through what possibilities remain open for an embodied re-membering of the past against the colonialist practices of erasure and the related desire to set time aright, Barad calls for thinking a certain undoing of time, a work of mourning accountable to those most profoundly affected by ongoing ecological destruction and by racist, colonialist, and nationalist violence, human and otherwise. This task is related to rethinking the notion of the void. Against its Newtonian interpretation as the absence of matter and energy, as that which does not matter and thus works to justify colonial occupation, Barad argues that the QFT void is a spectral domain where life and death are originarily entangled, and inanimate matter itself gives itself to be thought in its mortal finitude. The void is rather the yearning and the imagining of what might have been, and thus also the infinitely rich ground of imagining possibilities for living and dying otherwise.

    Karen Barad (Ph.D., Theoretical Particle Physics, SUNY Stony Brook) is Professor of Feminist Studies, Philosophy, and History of Consciousness at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Barad's Ph.D. is in theoretical particle physics and quantum field theory. Barad held a tenured appointment in a physics department before moving into more interdisciplinary spaces. Barad is the author of Meeting the Universe Halfway: Quantum Physics and the Entanglement of Matter and Meaning (Duke University Press, 2007) and numerous articles in the fields of physics, philosophy, science studies, poststructuralist theory, and feminist theory. Barad's research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Hughes Foundation, the Irvine Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Barad is the Co-Director of the Science & Justice Graduate Training Program at UCSC.

    For further information please
    contact:Professor Kate Goldfarb (Kathryn.Goldfarb@Colorado.edu; 303-492-1589) or
    Professor Arthur Joyce (Arthur.Joyce@Colorado.edu; 303-735-3055)
     

  • TRIPOD: MEAD, BATESON, BALI
    A mixed media documentary performance about ethnography, art, purpose, and the systems in which we find ourselves. The performance illustrates Bateson's theory of the ecology of mind, challenging us to think of the self as a relation - a nexus of information pathways that are located both within and beyond the body.
    Friday, April 7 Two shows: 4:30pm and 7:30pm in Old Main Chapel.  Admission is free, but seating is limited. All are welcome!

     MEAD, BATESON, BALI

  • Presentation and Conversation with Juana Alicia Ruiz
    Community Leader of Mampuján and 2015 Winner of the Colombian Peace Prize
    5:30-6:30pm, Thursday, April 6 Location Hale 230 Contact: Dani.merriman@colorado.edu
    Juana Alicia Ruiz
     
  • Spring 2017 Brown Bag Schedule, 12pm Hale Science Building Reading Room 450.

    Friday, March 17: Scott Ortman
    The Social Reactors Project--Human Settlements and Networks in History

    Ortman Brown Bag Talk

  • Public Anthropology: Responding to Public Urgency - Graduate Colloquium Committee
    an Invited Panel on Public Anthropology:
    Friday, March 17 from 4pm in Hale 230
    Reception to Follow in Hale 450

    Anthropologists writing at the dawn of the 21st century have been concerned with the discipline's attentiveness to timing and the 'unbearable slowness' of ethnography (Marcus 2003). Now, more than ever, in light of new policies, executive orders, a highly polarized political climate in the United States, and the resurgence of nativist and racist movements, many anthropologists are left wondering if there is a place for anthropology to respond to these events and if so, how the nature of fieldwork and writing fits into this response. In these times, we turn to public anthropologists — those who not only theorize and publish work for academics, but bridge their theory and method into a space that reacts to current events in meaningful ways and speaks to more than just an academic audience. During this panel and the discussion afterward, we will hear from scholars working on the ground and in print who use anthropology as a tool to fight back against injustice and ignorance. We are especially interested in starting conversations among anthropologists working and teaching in the state of Colorado. We hope to foster a multi-campus discussion that unites the Colorado anthropology community and speaks back to political dislocation.

  • List of Speakers:

    Professor Whitney Duncan (Department of Anthropology, University of Northern Colorado)
    Professor Sarah Horton (Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Denver)
    Professor Donna Goldstein (Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder)
    Dr. Steve Nash (Department Chair and Curator of Archaeology, Denver Museum of Nature and Science; blogger, Sapiens)
    Professor Bianca Williams (Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder)

  • Mayan Commoners and their Uncommon Lives
    CU on the Weekend Outreach lecture with Payson Sheets
    1pm - 4pm, Saturday, March 11 Jennie Smoly Caruthers Biotechnology Building, Butcher Auditorium
    cu on the weekend
     
  • MHA Nation Collaborative Film Project
    Thursday, March 9 from 10:00-11:30am in the Paleo Hall CU Museum of Natural History Henderson Bldg. (15th & Broadway)
    Please join us for Video presentations and Discussion with:
    Justin Deegan, Thunder Revolutions Studio Justin will screen his 4 minute video about Standing Rock. For more about Justin and his work, see here
    Elijah Benson, Nueta Language Initiative Elijah will screen short videos he has created for the Nueta (or Mandan) language revitalization program. For more about Elijah & his work, see here
    Justin and Elijah are from the Mandan Hidatsa Arikara (MHA) Nation in North Dakota. They were facilitators in the MHA Collaborative Film Project’s community-based filmmaking workshops at the MHA Nation in summer 2016. The event will be an informal discussion with the filmmakers.
    Please RSVP to ensure a spot around the table. Email jshannon@colorado.edu
    MHACollabFilm is a partnership between the University of Colorado – Boulder and the Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College. For more information, visit our project website, email Jen Shannon at jshannon@colorado.edu or find us on Facebook at mhacollaborativefilm.
     
  • Coffee & Donuts with Anthropology Professor Carole McGranahan
    ....Drop by for some coffee talk everyone welcome!
    Tuesday, March 7 from 10:00-11:00am in Hale 450
     
  • Remote Killing: Drones, Democracy and War
    Hugh Gustserson, George Washington University, Department of Anthropology
    Friday, March 3, 4:00pm in Atlas 100. Geography Department Colloquium
    Saturday, March 4 symposium on the social/legal/ethical aspects of drones.
     
  • 2017 CU Archaeological Field School Information meeting
    Thursday, March 2 at 5:00pm Hale 450

    2017 Field School Flyer
     

  • Spring 2017 Ethnography in Progress Series

    February 15: from A House for Every Daughter" - Chapter 3: Tamil Matrilocal Marriage in Akkaraipattu" 4 p.m., Hale 450

    by Dennis McGilvray (Professor Emeritus, Cultural Anthropology)

    Discussant: Anden Drolet (MA Student, Cultural Anthropology)

    With the end of the civil war in 2009, I began a series of fieldwork trips (2010, 2011, 2012, 2014) to Akkaraipattu in eastern Sri Lanka where I have done research since 1969, specifically looking for young couples (both Hindu and Muslim) who were married since the 2004 tsunami.  Because I had older field notes on marriage going back forty years, I hoped it would be possible to look at the marriage system longitudinally, and also to separate the older “matrilineal descent” questions from the more interesting new questions about persistent matrilocal residence and transfer of real property (houses, paddy lands) to women at marriage, regardless of matrilineal clan membership.  At the same time, I was becoming more aware of similarities with matrilocal marriage practices in other parts of the island, as well as in coastal South India (Tamilnadu and Kerala) where I did 2 months of fieldwork in 2015. My book proposal is still being formulated, but I am thinking of organizing the chapters like this: 1. Introduction, 2. Issues & debates in South Asian marriage and dowry, 3. Tamil matrilocal marriage in Akkaraipattu, 4. Muslim (Moorish) matrilocal marriage in Akkaraipattu, 5. Matrilocal influences in other regions of Sri Lanka, 6. Matrilocal marriage along the South Indian coast, 7. Summary and conclusions.

    The chunk you will be reading is a first draft of Ch. 3, containing the most detailed and vivid Tamil marriage case studies I gathered in Akkaraipattu.  I’d love to hear criticisms and suggestions of any kind, but especially your questions about what I have not said, what contemporary anthropological issues I have not addressed but should – assuming I have the data to do so.  Hopefully, by February 15, I will also have set up a photo exhibit in the 2nd floor Hale display case showing some of the people and places I talk about in my chapter.

  • March 1: Is China a Settler Colonial State? Indigeneity and Tibet | 4 p.m., Hale 455

    by Dawa Lotyitsang (PhD Student, Cultural Anthropology)

    Discussant: Willi Lempert (PhD Candidate, Cultural Anthropology)

    What does Asian settler colonialism look like? When looking over the literature regarding settler colonialism, majority of the literature draws its analysis from Euro-American examples. I’m interested in tracking settler colonialism in Asia, and more specifically, Chinese settler colonialism in the context of Tibet. My paper tracks Tibet’s invasion by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and its eventual incorporation under the Chinese settler state. I argue that this incorporation took place following CCP’s construction of Tibet as an “autonomous region” with a settler governmentality which managed Tibet as a colony. Following the construction of a settler governmentality, Tibetans who were identified as sovereign Tibetan subjects before China’s invasion, began being constructed under the settler state as a Chinese “minority.” The construction of Tibet as an “autonomous region” and Tibetans as racialized minority Chinese, I argue, reveals China to be a settler colonial state. While current literature on China speaks to its economic and imperial moves across the globe, it barely touches the topic of China as a settler colonial state. My paper will attempt to do this. 

    March 15: "Friendship and Kinship: New Possibilities for Intimacy for Professional Women in Bangalore, India" 4 p.m., IBS 290

    by Rachel Fleming (PhD, Cultural Anthropology)

    Discussant: Austin Sibley (PhD Student, Cultural Anthropology) 

    What does friendship have to do with intimacy? Can friends be as intimate as romantic partners and/or kin? What does intimacy mean? This article considers generational changes in how middle-class women in Bangalore perceive the role of friendship in their lives, especially as younger women take on professional identities and change how intimacy and kinship inform their sense of self.

    April 13: "In the Time of Frost: Living with Death during El Niño in Highlands New Guinea" | 4 p.m., Hale 455 - CANCELLED

    by Professor Jerry Jacka (Assistant Professor, Cultural Anthropology)

    Discussant: Elijah Townsend (MA Student, Cultural Anthropology)

    The system of weather known as El Niño brings extreme climatic anomalies to the Papua New Guinea highlands. Prolonged droughts accompanied by night-time frosts devastate subsistence gardens. In response, people migrate to lower altitude areas where kin and friends provide sustenance and social support. However, with increasing economic development and the demise of collective kin endeavors in the region, long-distance migration networks no longer offer people respite from food insecurity. In this paper, I examine the changes in social responses to El Niño-caused food shortages at varying scales – from subsistence farmers to international aid agencies – over the past 50 years. The paper explores how people learn to live with death and highlights the limits of resilience when customary social-ecological systems of adaptation intersect with international development efforts.

    April 27: "Bad Blood" | 4 p.m., Hale 455

    by Allison Formanack (PhD Candidate, Cultural Anthropology)

    Discussant: Drew Zachary (PhD Student, Cultural Anthropology)

    American cultural stereotypes consider “white trash” and “trailer trash,” both pejorative phrases, as synonymous; that is, “trailer trash” serves as a representational form of “white trash.” This under-examined notion is often reproduced in social science research on the interrelationship of housing, class, and place-based identities (e.g. Desmond 2016, Hartigan 2005, Isenburg 2016, McCarty 2010, Moss 2003). Operated as private businesses, informal (not to mention, illegal) racial discrimination practices existed in most “trailer parks” well into the 1980s, thus cementing both the parks’ class- and race-based associations for residents and the wider public. However, this same business model promising cheap housing with fewer regulations and scrutiny has made mobile homes a popular choice among newly-arrived immigrants, in particular Mexicans and Central Americans, since the 1990s (Hiemstra 2010, Kusenbach 2015, Nelson & Hiemstra 2008). As such, despite the continued use of “white/trailer trash” in popular discourse, in practice mobile home communities (MHCs) often have the most racial/ethnic diversity within a given region. In this dissertation chapter, I draw on ethnographic data collected in Crown Court MHC, located near downtown Lincoln, Nebraska, to examine the interconnections between demographic transition and racialized notions of place and belonging within a stigmatized space, the “trailer park.” Here, I consider how residents interpreted demographic and sensorial (alternatively, affective) changes in Crown Court relative to the persistent stigmas of being either “white trash” or “trailer trash.” Moreover, I show how being named “trailer trash” differently affects white and Latino/a residents, which reveals a discursive gap between this concept and “white trash.” Exploring both the conceptual overlap and distinctiveness of “white trash” and “trailer trash,” I argue, illustrates how certain unstable (or ambiguous, amorphous, placeless) identities are negotiated, contested, and materialized in specific places.

  • After the land grab: Infrastructural violence and the mafia system in Indonesia's oil palm plantation zone, Anthropology Department Distinguished Lecture.
    Professor Tania Murray Li, University of Toronto
    4pm, Friday, February 24 in Hale 230
    Li

  • "True Collaborators: Embracing Care and Immorality in the Study of Organized White Nationalism" Department Colloquium.
    Professor Benjamin R. Teitelbaum, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, Affiliate in International Affairs, University of Colorado, Boulder
    4pm, Friday, February 17 in Hale 230
    Teitelbaum

Comanche
"Comanche vs. Osage," painting by George Catlin.

  • "Barbarian Culture: Researches into the other Other" Department Colloquium.
    Dr. Severin Fowles, Associate Professor, Barnard College and Columbia University
    4pm, Friday, January 27 in Hale 230

    Abstract: Barbarians, like primitives, are mythologized foils of civilization. But unlike primitives, barbarians have teeth and fight back. Barbarians are active (they invade; they come to you). Primitives are passive (they are colonized; you go to them). Barbarians do not represent the innocent youth of the world, but rather its rebellious adolescence. Barbarians are male. Primitives are female. This, at least, is the discursive opposition that emerged in the Western intellectual tradition during the nineteenth century.

    Anthropology has always had a lot to say about “primitives,” but comparatively little to say about “barbarians.” Why? Why have the classic objects of the anthropological imagination been cold rather than hot traditions? What new conversations might emerge were we to focus on societies that do not precede the state so much as oppose the state? What if we traded in the problem of anachronism for the problem of antagonism? What if anthropology were reassembled around engagements with Others who challenge and threaten imperial projects rather than Others who suffer colonialism or submit to a relentless civilizing process? This presentation considers these questions in light of the author’s recent efforts to build an archaeological account of the Comanche history of the American Southwest.

  • "Comanche Archaeology and the Theater of War" Public Lecture.
    Dr. Severin Fowles, Associate Professor, Barnard College and Columbia University
    7pm, Saturday, January 28 in Hale 270

    Abstract: The colonial history of the American Southwest looks quite a bit different today than it did only a decade ago. We used to know who the empires were: the Spanish imperial project commenced in the sixteenth century and held back the advance of the French imperial project during the eighteenth century, before both succumbed to the American imperial project in the nineteenth century. We used to know who the barbarians were as well: as the Germanic hordes were to Rome, so the bellicose equestrian tribes of the Plains were to European and Euro-American civilizations. But now these plot lines have come undone. Now we are told that, for much of the colonial era, some of the most ambitious imperial actors were Native American—and that the Comanche in particular were involved in a strange form of "reversed colonialism," startling the European colonizers by attempting to colonize them in return. In this presentation, I report on new archaeological discoveries that complicate and extend this revisionist understanding of intercultural power dynamics in the colonial Southwest.


    Severin Fowles

    Brief Biography:

    Severin Fowles is an Associate Professor at Barnard College and Columbia University who has spent the past two decades investigating the pre-colonial, colonial, and modern histories of the American Southwest. He is the author of An Archaeology of Doings: Secularism and the Study of Pueblo Religion (2013, SAR) and the co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Southwest Archaeology (in press, Oxford). His current research focuses on the archaeology of Comanche imperialism in eighteenth century New Mexico.
     

  • Running of the Buffalo: The Archaeology of the Roberts Buffalo Jump (5LR100), Northern Colorado.
    Chris Johnston, Assistant State Archaeologist
    Thursday, January 19, 2017 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm at the CU Museum
    More information at: Indian Peaks Chapter - CAS
    Sponsored by the Program for Writing & Rhetoric WRITE Lab, Anthropology, Communication, Women & Gender Studies.

  • AIA lecture: The Peopling of the Americas in Global Perspective
    Wednesday, January 18 from 7:00-8:30pm
    CU Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall
    Archaeologist John F. Hoffecker, of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, discusses the global dispersal of anatomically modern humans (Homo sapiens) southwards from Berengia into the Americas and explains how researchers use skeletal, genetic and archaeological data to reconstruct patterns and likely migration routes.
    Admission is free. Seating is limited. Doors open at 6:15 PM. Contact: CU Museum

  • Fall 2016 Brown Bag Schedule, 12pm Hale Science Building Reading Room 450.

    Friday, December 9: Hannah Selvey
    Cranial Morphology and its role in Conservation and Husbandry
    Abstract: This research examines cranial metrics of Malagasy lemur and big cat specimens in local and international museum collections. The mechanical properties of diet are key drivers of variation in cranial morphology both within and across species. Oral processing of tough foods, such as skin, raw meat, and bones in carnivoran diets and tamarind seed pods in lemur diets requires increased chewing/mechanical effort compared to captive diets. Thus, cranial morphology should reflect this differential effort. Though zoological institutions attempt to mimic wild diets from a nutritional standpoint, mechanical properties are often not considered. A preliminary investigation of captivity’s impact on cranial morphology in lions and tigers showed that significant differences in robusticity of masticatory features were evident and when subjected to discriminant function analysis were able to predict captivity status of “unknown” individuals. This brownbag will discuss the role of cranial morphology in conservation and husbandry efforts and the implications of these preliminary findings for lemurs.
    Selvey Brown Bag

  • Coffee & Donuts with Anthropology Professor Alison Cool
    ....Drop by for some coffee talk everyone welcome!
    Thursday, December 8 from 10:00-11:00am in Hale 450
    Donuts Poster
  • Archaeological Institute of America Lecture Series: New Perspectives on Ancient Urbanism
    Tuesday, December 7 from 7:00-8:30pm at the CU Museum of Natural History
    John “Jack” Hanson (ANTH Post-Doc) will attempt to answer questions about city life in the ancient Greek and Roman world by drawing on the new research on ancient urbanism that has been put forward in his forthcoming book. He will explore what it can tell us about what it was like to live in the ancient world and how it compared to the medieval and modern world.
    Contact: cumuseum@colorado.edu
    Hanson Poster
  • Department of Anthropology's Annual Proseminar Conference
    10am - 2pm, Saturday, December 3 in Hale 270
    Conference program
  • Careers in Public Archaeology: A Panel Discussion
    4pm, Friday, December 2 in Hale 230
    Public Archaeology Panel
  • Graduate Student Workshop with Professor Susana Durão: "From fieldwork into the public: Some brief lessons about the ethnography of policing"
    November 29
    , 1 p.m. Hale 450
    Lunch will be served: Please RSVP to Arielle Milkman
  • LASC Visiting Scholar Talk: "Moral economies of suspicion: Security assemblages and cityscapes in São Paulo"
    Professor Susana Durão
    , State University of Campinas, Unicamp (São Paulo, Brazil)
    November 28, 4 p.m. Guggenheim 206
    LASC Visiting Scholar Talk
  • Coffee & Donuts with Anthropology Professor Joanna Lambert
    ....Drop by for some coffee talk!
    Coffee & Donuts with Faculty
  • Mining Development, Resource Conflicts, and El Niño Migrations in Highlands New Guinea
    Jerry Jacka, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Colorado Boulder
    3:30pm, Friday, November 11 in Guggenheim 205
  • Fall 2016 Brown Bag Schedule, 12:30pm Hale Science Building Room 450.

    What's Next? Anthropologists come together after the election.
    Kaifa Roland, Thursday November 10, 12:30, Hale Reading Room - Lunch will be provided
    What’s Next? – Roundtable Notes

    The 2016 presidential election has been stressful, divisive, and disheartening. While many of us are simply counting the hours until November 8th, this election has highlighted issues that will endure long after the polls close. Regardless of the outcome, it is evident that we have a lot of work to do as a country to address the multiple forms of inequality that persist in our society. As anthropologists, we are trained to think critically about inequality and the ways that it affects intersecting social identities. But, what can we do (as students, teachers, friends, researchers) in the aftermath of the election? Please join Professor Roland to think through the election and its broader implications for our macro and micro communities. What's next?
    Brown Bag - Election Round Table

  • "At the Threshold of this Life: Marriage, Family, and Migration between Nepal and New York".
    Dr. Sienna Radha Craig, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Dartmouth College
    3:30pm, Friday, November 4 in Guggenheim 205
    Dr Sienna Craig
    If you are unable to view the image above, please view it at our webpage here.
     
  • Creating, Mantaining, and Mitigating Inequality at Punta Laguna, Mexico

    Dr. Sarah Kurnick, Chancellor's Postdoctoral Felow, University of Colorado Boulder
    4:00pm, Friday, October 28 in Hale Science 230

    Sarah Kurnick
    In this presentation, I’ll consider two critical questions. How do political regimes use the past to justify their authority, particularly in the aftermath of drastic social change? And, how can archaeologists and descendant communities collaboratively employ the past to ameliorate inequality and produce social and economic well-being? I’ll then discuss the ancient Maya archaeological site and contemporary Maya community of Punta Laguna, where I direct an archaeological project focused on understanding the creation and mitigation of inequality. I’ll conclude by considering what archaeology – in a post-Occupy Wall Street era, where the Black Lives Matter Movement and issues of sexual violence so frequently dominate the headlines – can and should contribute to contemporary discussions of economic, racial, and gender inequities.

    Anthropology Colloquium Series

    For additional information, please contact Arthur Joyce

  • Fall 2016 Brown Bag Schedule, 12pm Hale Science Building Room 450.

    Friday, October 21: Rachel Egan
    A Review of the 2016 Arenal Research Project: thoughts and future directions
    Rachel Egan, Friday October 21, noon, Hale Reading Room
    Abstract: This past summer I traveled to Costa Rica with Dr. Payson Sheets, Dr. Christine Dixon, and Dr. Tom Sever as part of the Arenal research project. The Arenal region, located along the continental divide in northern Costa Rica, is characterized by frequent volcanic eruptions emanating from the Arenal volcano. These eruptions have had significant impacts on present, historic, and prehistoric populations. One avenue for exploring how prehistoric populations mitigated the risk that the Arenal volcano presented is through the reconstruction of social networks. In this case, footpaths entrenched into the ground surface through repeated use. This project focused on a section of path along the now-named La Chiripa site. This brownbag will discuss the findings of the 2016 field season and the relevance for future research, including my dissertation.
    Arenal research groupArenal

  • Pursuing Happiness: Black Women, Love, and Diasporic Dreaming in Jamaica

     Black Women, Love, and Diasporic Dreaming in Jamaica
    Dr. Bianca Williams, Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies, University of Colorado Boulder

    4:00pm, Friday, October 14 in Hale Sciences 230

    Anthropology Colloquium Series

    For additional information, please contact Carla Jones

  • Annual Statewide Archaeological Conference to be held in Grand Junction this year.  The 81st Annual Conference of the Colorado Archaeological Society (CAS) will be hosted by the Grand Junction chapter of CAS at Colorado Mesa University (CMU), October 7-10. Anyone is invited to participate in the conference; no archaeological background or affiliation is required. Saturday evening, Dr. Steve Lekson, will talk after dinner about Chaco Canyon and its influence on the archaeology of southwestern Colorado.
    For details and conference registration materials visit this website. You can also email or call for information CASGJinfo@gmail.com or 970-433-4312.
  • "Restructuring Life: Citizenship, Territory and Religiosity in Nepal’s State of Transformation"  Friday, October 7 at 4:00pm in Hale 230

    Dr. Sara Shneiderman, Professor of Anthropology, University of British Columbia
    Professor Shneiderman's research explores the relationships between political discourse, ritual action, and cross-border mobility in producing ethnic identities and shaping social transformation. She is the author of the book Rituals of Ethnicity: Thangmi Identities Between Nepal and India (2015), which is a transnational study of the relationships between mobility, ethnicity, and ritual action.
    Restructuring Life
    This is co-sponsored by the Tibet Himalaya Initiative, the Center for Asian Studies, and the Department of Anthropology.

  • Stories of Darkness: Congolese Refugees, Humanitarian Governance, and a Neglected Conflict
    Marnie Thomson will defend her doctoral dissertation on Wednesday, September 28. Public presentation at 12:30pm in the Reading Room, Hale 450.
  • Fall 2016 Ethnography in Progress Series - Faculty/Graduate Writing Workshops
    "Material Mnemonics in Japanese Child Welfare" | September 21, 4 p.m. Hale Science Building Room 450
    by Kate Goldfarb (Assistant Professor, Cultural Anthropology)

    Discussant: Ayden Parish (PhD Student, Linguistics/ CLASP)

    Description:
    This is an early draft of the fifth chapter of my book manuscript, which is (very!) provisionally entitled Fragile Kinships: Materializing Relationships in Japanese State Care. The concept of “materializing” offers an orienting thematic for the book as a whole, which explores the ways social inequalities—particularly, an uneven distribution of care and concern—are perceived in material things and the bodies of people who have experienced separation from kin and caregivers, neglect, and sometimes violence. This chapter explores memory (both traumatic and not), narrative, and story-telling, to open up questions about the ways individual memory is also necessarily interpersonal, and to consider how memory and time are materialized and known by way of material media like bodies and documents.

    "Dreaming Down the Track: The Mediation of Aboriginal Futurisms" | October 20, 4p.m. Hale Science Building Room 450
    by Willi Lempert (PhD Candidate, Cultural Anthropology)
    Discussant: Dawa Lokyitsang (PhD Student, Cultural Anthropology)

    Description:
    This is a foundational chapter in which I work through futurity as a primary analytic for my dissertation. I articulate how the construction of corporeal futures through filmmaking can mediate Australian imaginaries around what is possible, desirable, and inevitable for Aboriginal peoples. I argue for the temporal reorientation of anthropological projects toward futures, especially in relation to peoples so associated with mythic pasts and ever-fraught presents.

    "Refugee Citizenship as Political Subjectivity: Tibetan Asylum Journeys from New York City to Toronto" | October 27, 4 p.m. Hale Science Building Room 450
    by Carole McGranahan (Associate Professor, Cultural Anthropology)
    Discussant: Marnie Thomson (PhD Candidate, Cultural Anthropology)

    Description:
    This article-in-progress is part of my ongoing research of both formal and everyday practices of political subjectivity by Tibetan refugees in diaspora, specifically in Kathmandu, Dharamsala, Toronto, and New York City. Unlike the first generation who was born in Tibet, the much larger population of Tibetans born in exile have long had under or undocumented refugee status in India and Nepal, whereas escapees from Tibet also do not qualify for documentation in either India or Nepal. This article focuses on the Tibetan communities in Canada and the USA where, in contrast, the majority of Tibetans have obtained legal citizenship. My research explores how the first generation of refugees defined and debated refugee versus citizenship status, and how younger generations inhabit and redefine categories of political subjectivity established by their elders. Within this context, my primary research questions are: Given the current political order, what does it mean to live as a noncitizen in a world where rights are assigned primarily through citizenship? To follow, what forms of citizenship do Tibetan refugees claim and refuse, and with what repercussions for local, national, and global political possibilities?

    "Narrative Resonance: The Mixed Marriage of Humanitarian Categories and Tribalism" | November 9, 4 p.m. Hale Science Building Room 450
    by Marnie Thomson (PhD Candidate, Cultural Anthropology)
    Discussant: Arielle Milkman (MA Student, Cultural Anthropology)

    Description:
    How do narratives take hold, grow, and amplify? In this piece, I theorize how this happens in a UN camp for Congolese refugees in Tanzania by examining the ways in which both camp residents and aid workers are bound to certain narratives about Congo in order to successfully navigate international humanitarian policy and services.

  • Fall 2016 Brown Bag Schedule, 12pm Hale Science Building Room 450.

    Friday, September 16: Lindsay Johansson
    The Fremont Experiment: Examining the Evidence of Community Structures, Settlement Clustering, and Leadership among the Fremont

    Lindsay D. Johansson, Friday September 16, noon, Hale Reading Room
    Abstract: During the Fremont period, groups in the eastern Great Basin aggregated into larger and more permanent settlements, and these settlements clustered together across the landscape. Within many settlement clusters, sites exist containing architecturally distinct buildings which were used differently than typical residential structures. Broadly, these distinct buildings can be divided into two types, central structures and oversized pit structures, both of which have some evidence of communal functions. Based on correlations between settlement clustering and buildings with communal functions, this paper argues that the organization of people into larger, more settled communities played an important role in Fremont daily life. Within these communities, activities taking place either in or in association with central structures and oversized pit structures as well as the architecture of some homes suggest the presence of leaders and increasing status differentiation among those living in the eastern Great Basin ca. AD 900 to 1200.

    Friday, October 7: Devin Pettigrew
    Testing Basketmaker Curved, Grooved Sticks

    Devin Pettigrew, Friday October 7, noon, Hale Reading Room
    In the American Southwest, archaeologists have recovered multi-curved grooved sticks with pitch coated knobs tied to handles – what was their purpose? Devin’s research involves experimenting with S-shaped sticks to: fend atlatl darts, throw as rabbit sticks. The sticks are comparable in structure and mechanics to straight-flying boomerangs used in hunting and war in North America and Australia.

    Friday, December 9: Hannah Selvey
    Cranial Morphology and its role in Conservation and Husbandry
    Abstract: This research examines cranial metrics of Malagasy lemur and big cat specimens in local and international museum collections. The mechanical properties of diet are key drivers of variation in cranial morphology both within and across species. Oral processing of tough foods, such as skin, raw meat, and bones in carnivoran diets and tamarind seed pods in lemur diets requires increased chewing/mechanical effort compared to captive diets. Thus, cranial morphology should reflect this differential effort. Though zoological institutions attempt to mimic wild diets from a nutritional standpoint, mechanical properties are often not considered. A preliminary investigation of captivity’s impact on cranial morphology in lions and tigers showed that significant differences in robusticity of masticatory features were evident and when subjected to discriminant function analysis were able to predict captivity status of “unknown” individuals. This brownbag will discuss the role of cranial morphology in conservation and husbandry efforts and the implications of these preliminary findings for lemurs.

  • Mesa of Sorrows: Archaeology, History & the Ghosts of the Awat'ovi Pueblo
    Free lecture Tuesday, September 20 from 7:00-8:30pm in Hellems room 252
    Historian, anthropologist, and award-winning author Dr. James F. Brooks will present facts and findings from his latest book, Mesa of Sorrows: A History of the Awat'ovi Massacre, one of the most important events in the early historic period in the American Southwest.
    Presented by: CU Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Center of the American West; University of Colorado Museum of Natural History and Conference on World Affairs.
    Recording of this event available to public here
  • September 12, 2016 at 7:00PM at Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Ricketson Auditorium
    The Magic of Social Networking, Past and Present
    By Scott Ortman
    Sponsor: Denver Chapter Colorado Archaeological Society
    CAS Meetings
  • September 8, 2016 at 7:00PM at University of Colorado Museum, Paleontology Hall
    Where is the American Southwest and Why Isn't it There Anymore? By Doug Bamforth

    Sponsored by Indian Peaks Chapter, Colorado Archaeology Society (IPCAS)
    Most people, including most archaeologists, have a very clear image of where the American Southwest is and what it looks like. It is about where Coronado said it was in the mid-16th century, it is generally not too far from fine dining and high end art galleries, and it has pueblos and deserts, mesas and canyons. If we define the Southwest in terms of indigenous identity and try to look at that identity using archaeological data, though, Coronado's (and R.C. Gorman's) Southwest is problematic. The cultural Southwest was once much larger than it is on the maps in our textbooks, and knowing this fundamentally changes what we often think we know about topics like Plains/Pueblo interaction.

  • September 7, 2016 at 12:00PM in Hale 256
    "Eruptions that Shook the World"
    Mt.PinatuboProfessor Clive Oppenheimer, of Cambridge University in England, will give a special guest presentation on “Eruptions that Shook the World”.
    Dr. Oppenheimer is one of the world’s authorities in volcanology, effects of explosive eruptions on ancient and recent societies, and remote sensing. He has done original research on volcanoes and their impacts and recoveries in various parts of the world including the Caribbean and Mt Erebus in the Antarctic. He published a book at Cambridge University Press in 2011 entitled “Eruptions that Shook the World.” His slide-illustrated presentation will discuss some of the greatest eruptions of ancient and more recent times, and will discuss their implications for people, their adaptations, and their cultures.
    For more information, contact Payson.Sheets@colorado.edu, Rachel Egan, or Jen Deats.

  • September 1, 2016 at 6:30PM in Hale 270
    Unexpected Buddha: The Illusory visions of contemporary Tibetan artist, Karma Phuntsok

BrownBag Lecture with William Lammons, Anthropology Graduate Student, Graffiti’s “Royale with Cheese”: Transnational Cultural Diffusion and Heterogeneity in Mérida, Yucatan, Friday, October 16th at 12pm, Hale 450. I use graffiti in Mérida, Mexico as a lens to examine the phenomena of transnationalism and cultural migration.  I look at the migration of graffiti practitioners and the relationships they maintain across cultural lines to facilitate the development of locally unique graffiti “scenes”.  I first look at graffiti’s origins in the US in the 60s and 70s, then its development in Mérida, Yucatan.   I find that when culture, like graffiti, crosses cultural and political boundaries, it “heterogenizes”, or becomes locally unique.  I present Mérida’s most striking visual differentiations in its use of locally significant Maya, or Maya-like, figures.

BrownBag Archaeology Lecture with Dr. Scott Fitzpatrick, Assoc. Prof., U of Oregon Thursday October 1 at 11:30am, Hale 450.
“Life and Death at the Chelechol ra Orrak Rockshelter in Palau, Western Micronesia”
Dr. Scott M. Fitzpatrick is an archaeologist who specializes in the archaeology of island and coastal regions, particularly the Pacific and Caribbean. Much of his research focuses on colonization events, seafaring strategies, adaptations to smaller islands, exchange systems, chronometric techniques, and human impacts on ancient environments. He has active field projects in Palau (western Micronesia) and several islands in the Caribbean, including Carriacou and Mustique in the Grenadines, as well as Nevis. Dr. Fitzpatrick is the founding Co-Editor of the Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology, Associate Editor for Archaeology in Oceania, and serves on the editorial boards for three other journals, including the newly established Journal of Archaeological Science.
Contact: Jerry.Jacka@colorado.edu

BrownBag with Adam Schneider, post-doctoral fellow in CIRES Friday, October 2 from 12:00-1:00pm in Hale 450
“Political Climates”: Politics, Economics, and Environmental Resilience in Premodern Societies
In the past twenty-five years, there has been a resurgence of interest in studying the processes that shaped ancient societal collapses. In particular, a great deal of attention is now being paid to the potential role of environmental change as a cause of ancient collapse events, both in academic literature and popular media. One result of this increased interest in the relationship between social transformations and environmental change is that a growing number of scholars are seeking to understand how and why some past societies appear to have been more resilient in the face of environmental change than others. In this presentation, I will discuss how cultural factors, such as the political and economic priorities of premodern states, appear to have helped shape their environmental resilience (for better or for worse) during periods of climatic instability. Finally, I will consider what modern societies who are likely to experience similar challenges as a result of anthropogenic climate change might be able to learn from these historical cases. Contact: Jennifer.Deats@colorado.edu

Archaeology Lectures Sponsored by the CU Museum
Wednesday, October 7: “Cleopatra: An Archaeological Perspective on Egypt’s Last Pharaoh”. AIA Lecture by Dr. John Hale, University of Louisville, KY at 7:00pm in HUMN 1B50.
Thursday October 15: “Did the Ilopango eruption in El Salvador cause the collapse of Teotihuacan?” Speaker: Payson Sheets. 7:00pm at the CU Museum. http://cumuseum.colorado.edu
Thursday, November 12: “La Consentida: The Origins of Village Life in Coastal Oaxaca, Mexico” Speaker: Guy Hepp. 7:00pm at the CU Museum. http://cumuseum.colorado.edu

Doug Bamforth in the latest Coloradan magazine? A major story on the Mahaffy Exhibit in the CU Museum http://www.coloradanmagazine.org/2015/09/01/tools-of-the-camel-hunters/ Opens October 9

  • Spring 2015 Brown Bag Schedule, 12pm Hale Science Building Room 450
    Wednesday, February 4: Dani Merriman
    Wednesday, February 18: Gerardo Gutierrez
    Wednesday, March 4: Jakob Sedig (11-noon)
    Wednesday, March 18: Rachel Egan
    Friday, April 10: David Shaul and Tonio LeFebre
    Friday, May 1st: David Shaul
  • March  12, 2015  -IPCAS March Presentation Meeting (Second Thursday) Fire, Sweet Corn, Violence, Demography, Woodrow Wilson and the Lindberghs: A new history of Aztec Ruins excavated from Earl Morris’ field notes… (with some interesting implications for Chaco Canyon too)
    Speaker:  Erin Baxter 7:00 pm. Dinosaur room, CU Museum of Natural History.
    For directions and parking  go to http://cumuseum.colorado.edu/visit/directions
     
  • January 24, 2015 at 7PM in Hale 270 – Public Lecture: John W. Ives, Executive Director, Institute of Prairie Archaeology, Landrex Distinguished Professor, Department of Anthropology University of Alberta “The Ninth Clan—Exploring Apachean Origins in the Promontory Caves, Utah.” Twentieth century anthropologist Julian Steward concluded in the 1930s that the Promontory Caves on Great Salt Lake, Utah, contained highly suggestive evidence that Navajo or Apache ancestors had lingered briefly in the eastern Great Basin on their way between Canada and the American Southwest. Compelling though Steward’s arguments were, comparatively few archaeologists took them seriously. Today we can use the astonishing array of perishable materials (including hundreds of moccasins, as well as mittens, other clothing, basketry bows, arrows, and bison robes) from Steward’s as well as our own more recent excavations in the Promontory Caves to illustrate how Steward was indeed correct, and how Dene ancestors originally from the Subarctic had begun their transformation toward historic Navajo and Apache cultural identities.
  • January 23, 2015 at 4PM in Hale 270 – Faculty Lecture: John W. Ives, Executive Director, Institute of Prairie Archaeology, Landrex Distinguished Professor, Department of Anthropology University of Alberta
    Promontory Point—Implications of a High Fidelity Archaeological Record for Apachean Migration” Discussions of prehistoric migration are frequently founded upon ordinary archaeological records that present archaeologists with fundamental challenges. Nowhere would this be truer than in the Dene (Athapaskan) world, where we often deal with assemblages composed entirely of lithics, and where we know that Dene peoples shared a cultural genius for rapidly emulating neighboring material cultures. With their extraordinary preservation of all material culture, Utah’s Promontory Caves allow detailed interdisciplinary probing of Apachean migration, applying hypotheses developed in light of current migration theory in the social sciences.  Apachean ancestors who had left the Subarctic Canada encountered a turbulent AD 13th century world in which hunting and gathering lifestyles offered not simply an option, but at times, a highly preferable alternative to terminal Fremont and Puebloan lifeways, themselves undergoing profound change.

  • November 14, 2014 at 12PM in Hale 455 – Brown Bag Lecture Series, UAV (drone-based) survey at Cuyamungue, New Mexico–an alternative to LiDAR. Scott Ortman, Sara Cullen, Kaitlyn Davis, Rachel Egan, Lindsay Johansson.
  • November 7, 2014 at 4PM in Hale 230 – Public Lecture, Rotting Bodies: The Clash of Stances toward Materiality and its Ethical Affordances. Professor Web Keane, George Herbert Mead Collefiate Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan. Any community supposedly identified with a “single” kind of Christianity is likely to contain conflicts and divisions due to the different logics and temporalities associated, respectively, with ecclesiastical institutions, popular practices, and scriptural texts. These conflicts may extend even to basic ontological assumptions. This paper looks at clashes concerning popular practices surrounding relics and icons in Eastern Orthodoxy. It asks what are the ethical stakes when people insist on the powers of material things even in the face of withering criticism and contempt from inside and outside their church. That criticism, which can have both theological and atheist bases, often focuses on the allegedly instrumental reasoning and selfish motives of people who expect to receive divine intervention from objects such as relics and icons. I argue that popular practices that focus on the agency of objects may above all be responding to material properties as ethical affordances. These affordances provide ways of treating the world as ethically saturated. In the Eastern Orthodox context, this may be one way for ordinary villagers to take lofty theological claims about the divine nature of humans in concrete terms. Reception to follow.
  • November 6, 2014 at 12pm in Hale 450 – Brown Bag Lecture My Cry Gets up to My Throat’: Reflections on Reverend Case, the Garrison Dam, and the North Dakota Oil Boom through Collaborative Anthropology with the Mandan Hidatsa Arikara NationPresentation by Dr. Jen Shannon. This talk explains the process, and products, of a collaborative anthropology research project with the MHA Nation.  Our relationship began with a museum collection and NAGPRA consultation and moved on to creating an oral history video archive, a community website, and a documentary.  As Julie Cruikshank’s work shows, oral history recounts the past with lessons for the present for a contemporary audience.  Oral history also shows how our experiences of the past shape how we understand the present. As community members reflect on the role of a prominent missionary and his fight against the US Government program that dammed the Missouri River and flooded their homelands in the 1950s, they see parallels with the oil boom today. Contact: Jen Shannon at 303-492-6276 or jshannon@colorado.edu
  • October 24, 2014 at 3:30PM in GUGG 205 – Public Lecture, Taming Tibet: Landscape Transformation and the Gift of Chinese Development. Emily Yeh, Associate Professor of Geography, CU-Boulder. The violent protests in Lhasa in 2008 against Chinese rule were met by disbelief and anger on the part of Chinese citizens and state authorities, perplexed by Tibetans’ apparent ingratitude for the generous provision of development. In Taming Tibet, Emily T. Yeh examines how Chinese development projects in Tibet served to consolidate state space and power. Drawing on sixteen months of ethnographic fieldwork between 2000 and 2009, Yeh traces how the transformation of the material landscape of Tibet between the 1950s and the first decade of the twenty-first century has often been enacted through the labor of Tibetans themselves. Focusing on Lhasa, Yeh shows how attempts to foster and improve Tibetan livelihoods through the expansion of markets and the subsidized building of new houses, the control over movement and space, and the education of Tibetan desires for development have worked together at different times and how they are experienced in everyday life. The master narrative of the PRC stresses generosity: the state and Han migrants selflessly provide development to the supposedly backward Tibetans, raising the living standards of the Han’s “little brothers.” Arguing that development is in this context a form of “indebtedness engineering,” Yeh depicts development as a hegemonic project that simultaneously recruits Tibetans to participate in their own marginalization while entrapping them in gratitude to the Chinese state. The resulting transformations of the material landscape advance the project of state territorialization. Exploring the complexity of the Tibetan response to—and negotiations with—development, Taming Tibet focuses on three key aspects of China’s modernization: agrarian change, Chinese migration, and urbanization. Yeh presents a wealth of ethnographic data and suggests fresh approaches that illuminate the Tibet Question.

  • May 8, 2014 – 7:00PM – Scott Ortman – What the Pueblos can teach us about social development – CU Museum
    • The process of social development refers to the ability of human groups to control their physical and social environments to get things done. This process has been going on ever since people became farmers, and it has transformed the material conditions of life for all of humanity. In this talk, I suggest that economic growth is a special case of social development and that both processes involve the interactions of people, things and ideas. I also illustrate that this process appears to have operated the same way in the ancient Pueblo world that it does in our world today. If this is true, the archaeological record would appear to provide a rich and generally untapped resource for deepening our understanding of this most important process. Contact: indianpeaksarchaeology@gmail.com
       
  • April 25, 2014 – “Intimacies of War” Conference
  • April 18, 2014 – Student Speaker Series – Dr. Barth Wright – “Revisiting Capuchin Evolution and Adaptation” – Hale Science Building, Room 230
    • Dr. Barth Wright, PhD, Department of Anatomy, Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences will be giving a lecture regarding the Capuchin monkeys who represent a fascinating and informative model species for investigating the complexities of human and non-human primate evolution. Join us for a discussion regarding their behavioral and morphological variation and dietary ecology.
       
  • April 11, 2014 – 4:00PM – Student Speaker Series – Dr. Esteban Gomez – Memory and Practice on the Colonial Frontier – Hale Science Building, Room 230
    • In thinking about colonial entanglements, and the colonial legacies that take place thereafter, landscape, memory and place become useful terms and necessary concepts for understanding how people experienced and actively participated in different colonial settings. The research that forms the basis of this paper involves the historical documentation and archaeological excavation of Conchagua Vieja, a Lenca settlement on the island of Conchaguita, in the Gulf of Fonseca. Landscape, memory, and place will be explored here in order to explore the complexities that characterized the colonial situation in eastern El Salvador, as well as to better understand the connection between El Salvador’s colonial past and its present condition.
       
  • April 5, 2014 – 1:00PM – CU on the Weekend with Steven Leigh
  • April 3, 2014 – 12:00PM – Rachel Fleming – ANTH PhD Candidate. CAS Conference Room, 1424 Broadway, CU-Boulder. [CAS Luncheon Series]
    • As more Indian women enter workplaces in cities like Bangalore, especially in fields such as Information Technology, they are experiencing new dilemmas, lifestyles, and friendships that differ from previous generations. Based on several months of fieldwork in Bangalore and interviews with three generations of women, this talk presents conclusions about how women in this site understand and experience new work opportunities, gender interactions, attitudes about marriage, and changes in families, and how they come to rely on friends amidst rapid urban and social change in India.
  • February 28, 2014 – 4:00PM – Student Speaker Series – Dr. Annabeth Headrick – Hale Science Building, Room 230
    • Dr. Annabeth Headrick from the School of Art and Art History at the University of Denver will be giving a lecture entitled, “The Architectureal life of a Chichen Itza Warrior,” in room 230 of the Hale Science Building. This talk will explore how novel architectural arenas created functional venues that doubled as magnificent and constant reminders of the crucial political and economic roles played by the military. Further, while some structures documented the actions of the living warriors, another temple memorialized the fallen warriors, engendering heroism among the living and immortality for the dead. In sum, the city vetted the military participants on a large stage, reflecting their role in the city’s international success.
  • February 21, 2014 – 4:00PM – Student Speaker Series – Dr. Sarah Parcak – Hale Science Building, Room 230
    • Dr. Sarah Parcak is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Alabama in Birmingham (UAB), and is the founding Director of the UAB Laboratory for Global Observation. She is the first Egyptologist to use multispectral and high resolution satellite imagery analysis to identify previously unknown archaeological sites. Dr. Parcak will be giving a lecture entitled “Seeing the past from Space: The view from Egypt.” This presentation will discuss how archaeologists use NASA high resolution satellite technology to map and model ancient landscapes, with a focus on Egypt and the Mediterranean. It will show how high resolution satellites have allowed us to find previously unknown pyramids, settlements, temples, and other structures in Egypt. It will discuss the implications for understanding past human-environmental relationships, and how we need to move beyond “dots on a map”. The talk will also review archaeological sites threatened by looting following the Arab Spring, and the long term global issues for archaeological heritage. For more information please contact Zan Halmbacher.
  • February 7, 2014 – 4:00PM – Professor Lisa Rofel – Hale Science Building, Room 230
    • Professor Lisa Rofel joins The University of Colorado, Boulder for a lecture entitled “The Tranistional Business of Cultural Encounters in China:The Twenty-first Century Silk Road.” Professor Rofel attempts to answer questions regarding social inequality and its justification, class hierarchy, and how Maoist socialism has affected social development. For more information about this event, please contact Carla Jones.
  • January 25, 2014 – 7:00PM – Dr. Ken Sassaman – Hale Science Building, Room 270
    • Distinguished Archaeologist Speaker, Ken Sassaman of the University of Florida will give a talk entitled,Futurescapes of the Late Archaic: How Humans Dealth with Sea-Level Rise in the Long Term. Explore with Dr. Sassaman the Native American Societies of the Gulf Coast of 3000 to 5000 years ago – a landscape of settlements, monuments, and cemeteries that created a kind of time-space “map.” The history encoded in the landscape enabled Native communities along the Gulf Coast to call upon past experiences for future planning, making their landscape a futurescape. Dr. Sassaman will share how their vision of the future is reflected in their responses to sea-level rise.

      Video from Lecture Futurescapes of the Late Archaic: How Humans Dealth with Sea-Level Rise in the Long Term

  • January 24, 2014 – 4:00PM – Dr. Ken Sassaman – Hale Science Building, Room 230
  • January 21, 2014 – 4:00PM – Ruth Phillips – British Studies Room, Norlin Library
    • Noted Art Historian, Ruth Phillips, will be presenting her topic: “Monstances and Wampums: Jesuits, Iroquois, and Materializations of the Spiritual in Seventeenth-Century America. Ruth Phillips was the director of the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia from 1997 – 2003. She is currently Professor of Art History at Carleton College in Canada.

  • November 15, 2013 – 4:00PM – Dr. Kent Lightfoot – Hale Science Building, Room 230
    • Dr. Lightfoot’s general research interests include North American prehistory, coastal hunter-gatherer societies, the emergence of early village communities, and culture contact between Native peoples and European explorers and colonists. His current work focuses on how indigenous peoples responded to European contact and colonialism, and how the outcomes of these encounters influenced cultural developments in postcolonial contexts. He is an archaeologist from the University of California – Berkeley.

  • December 5, 2013 – 12:15PM – Oliver Paine – Hale Science Building, Room 450
    • “Grass and sedge consumption by our hominin ancestors: did C4 Plants help shape human evolution?” Oliver Paine is a PhD student and ANTH 2030 lab coordinator for the Anthropology department located in the Hale Science building.
  • November 14, 2013 – 12:15PM – Nevada Drollinger – Hale Science Building, Room 450
    • “The Changing Face of Buddhism: Buddhist ‘Terrorism’ and Western Imagination”. Nevada Drollinger is an MA candidate and Lead Teaching Assistant 2013-2014 in the Department of Religious Studies.

  • April 4, 2014 – 1:00PM – Magda Stawkowski – CAS Symposium 2014: Catastrophic Asia
    • Magda Stawkowski will be one of the featured scholars in this year’s symposium for the Center for Asian Studies. The Center for Asian Studies will host presentations on the risks, costs and effects of different types and contexts of disaster in a day-long symposium on April 4 beginning at 1:00pm in the British and Irish Studies Room on the fifth floor of Norlin Library. Presentations will be followed by a faculty panel of respondents, and the symposium will conclude with a reception.
  • February 11, 2014 – 6:15PM – Jonku Kim – Materiality of Transmutation: What Persists and What Projects?
    • Visual Arts Center (VAC) Lobby, CU Bolder
  • November 15, 2013 – 6:00PM – Brot Coburn – Everest – New and Old Perspectives about Mt. Everest and the Sherpas.
    • Eaton Humanities, Room 150

  • November 4, 2013 – 6:30PM – BHOPALI Film – Hale Science Building, Room 270
    • BHOPALI is a feature length documentary about the world’s worst industrial disaster, the 1984 Union Carbide gas leak in Bhopal, India, by award-winning director Van Maximilian Carlson. The film is followed by a Q&A with survivor-activist Sanjay Verma.