From its inception, mathematics has played a vital role in the organization of society and in our understanding of the world. As society has grown more complex, mathematical knowledge has evolved, expanded, and continued to function as a dynamic force in dealing with the problems of our times.

The mathematics program offers four tracks which lead to the B.A. degree. The Comprehensive Track emphasizes more theoretical mathematics, and is aimed at students seeking a general background in mathematics or intending to pursue graduate work in mathematics. The Applicable Track emphasizes more computational mathematics. The Secondary Education Track is designed to align with the Colorado licensure requirements for mathematics secondary education. The Computational Track is designed for students with an interest in the intersection of mathematics and computer science. All four tracks require calculus, MATH 2001, MATH 3001, and MATH 3130. You are urged to choose upper division courses that suit your educational objectives and career plans.    

Any student considering the pursuit of a graduate degree in mathematics should take MATH 3140 (Abstract Algebra 1) and MATH 4001 (Analysis 2). For students considering graduate study who need to fulfill the Arts & Sciences foreign language requirement, it is recommended that they do so in French, German, or Russian.

The University offers a program for obtaining secondary education mathematics teaching licensure. This program is offered through the School of Education.  For more information, please consult www.colorado.edu/education.

The Department of Mathematics offers two five-year concurrent degree programs: one leads to a B.A. and an M.A. in mathematics, while the other leads to a B.A. in mathematics and an M.S. in applied mathematics. For details, contact the department.

Those who specialize in mathematics are needed by almost all companies engaged in industrial and scientific research. In addition, organizations involved in computational work or statistical analysis make use of the talents of those trained in this field. Advanced work is necessary for students who plan to do research in pure mathematics. Career options for mathematics majors who have completed both theoretical and practical courses include jobs in business, industry, science, and government.  

Graduates trained in statistics are particularly in demand in statistical analysis, investment counseling, and actuarial work. The Mathematics Department is one of the sponsors of the Actuarial Studies and Quantitative Finance Program.  For more information on this program and the certificate tracks available to students, see http://www.colorado.edu/asqf/.

A nationwide need for well-trained secondary school mathematics teachers provides opportunities for students who have taken the appropriate program and earned state licensure. Please contact the School of Education for further information, http://www.colorado.edu/education/.

Career Services offers a number of programs and services designed to help you plan your career, including workshops, internships, and placement services after graduation. For more information, see: http://careerservices.colorado.edu/public/.

The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) offers students a chance to work alongside a faculty sponsor on original research. Learn to write proposals, conduct research, pursue creative work, analyze data and present the results. For more information, see http://enrichment.colorado.edu/urop/.

As a mathematics student, you should not overlook the opportunity to study abroad during your undergraduate years. The university offers more than 100 programs around the world. You may spend from a few weeks to a full academic year abroad, depending on the program selected. On these programs you may earn credit as if you had taken the courses here, sometimes fulfilling major or core requirements. Language study is a prerequisite for participation in many programs, so early planning for study abroad is essential. For more information, see Study Abroad home page at: http://studyabroad.colorado.edu/.

Mathematics majors can graduate with departmental or general honors through the Honors Program. For more information on honors, see the program web site at: http://www.colorado.edu/honors/.

Please speak with your advisor for specific recommendations; the following is intended to be a general outline only and there may be flexibility to this plan.
 

Mathematics 4-Year Plan
Average 30 credits per year

 

First Year – Fall Semester
MATH 1300
(5): Calculus 1
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (see Degree Audit for options)   
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (ex: Lower-Division Written Communication)
Elective/MAPS (3)

First Year – Spring Semester
MATH 2300
(5): Calculus 2
CORE (4): Content Area of Study (ex: Natural Science with Lab)   
CORE (3): Content Area of Study
Elective/MAPS (3)


Second Year – Fall Semester
MATH 2400
: Calculus 3
MATH 2001: Introduction to Discrete Mathematics             
CORE (3): Content Area of Study
Elective (3)
Elective (3)

Second Year – Spring Semester
MATH 3130
(3): Introduction to Linear Algebra
CORE (3): Content Area of Study
CORE (3): Content Area of Study
Elective (3)
Elective (3)


Third Year – Fall Semester
MATH Upper Division Elective
(3)
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (ex: Upper-Division Written Communication)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study
Elective (3)
Elective (3)

Third Year – Spring Semester
MATH 3001
(3): Analysis 1 *  
CORE (3): Content Area of Study
CORE (3): Content Area of Study
Elective (3)
Elective (3)


Fourth Year – Fall Semester
MATH Upper Division Elective
(3) 
MATH Upper Division Elective (3) 
CORE (3): Content Area of Study
Elective (3)
Elective (3)

Fourth Year – Spring Semester
MATH Upper Division Elective
(3) 
MATH Upper Division Elective (3) 
CORE (3): Content Area of Study
Elective (3)
Elective (3)

 

* There are six required courses for all Mathematics majors. In addition to those courses, each student is also required to adhere one of the following tracks: Comprehensive, Applicable, Secondary Educaton, Computational or Statistics. In total, students will need to succesfully complete at least 11 Math courses.