Physiology is the science of function in living organisms. The mission of the Department of Integrative Physiology is to discover and promote knowledge of how humans and other animals function at the level of cells, organs, and systems.

The program of study emphasizes both the role of physical activity in human health and function across the lifespan and the responses of different organisms to various forms of stress. Our multidisciplinary teaching program requires students to take foundational courses in anatomy, mathematics, physics, physiology, and statistics. With this basic knowledge, students can undertake a flexible curriculum that includes the study of biomechanics, cell physiology, comparative physiology, endo- crinology, exercise physiology, immunology, and neurophysiology. The Department also encourages student participation in research.

The integrative physiology (IP) program leads to a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. The program allows the student to learn the accumulated scientific knowledge about the human body and its responses to physical activity. As an IP student, you will spend a significant portion of your freshman and sophomore years taking prerequisite coursework in biology, chemistry, human anatomy and human physiology, physics, and statistics.

In your junior and senior years, you will take at least three of the six core courses: biomechanics, cell physiology, endocrinology, immunology, exercise physiology, and neurophysiology. In addition, a number of elective courses are offered to complete your degree including independent study, internships and honors work with individual faculty members.

Because of its emphasis on the natural sciences, many students select integrative physiology as a premedical degree since it provides the type of coursework required for advanced training in such areas as health, wellness, and medicine.

The program provides you with knowledge, skills, and expertise required for advanced training in many areas such as physical therapy, medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, exercise management, nursing, and physiological sciences. A degree in IP also qualifies you for other career possibilities in cardiac rehabilitation, chiropractic, geriatrics, physical fitness programming (industrial and corporate), and further scientific training in graduate school.

Career Services (www.colorado.edu/career) helps students discover who they are, what they want to do, and how to get there. They are the bridge between academics and the world of work. 

Career Services offers free services for all CU-Boulder degree-seeking students, and alumni up to one year after graduation. Meet individually the staff to discuss major and career exploration, internship or job searching, and graduate school preparation.

The office and laboratories for the Department of Integrative Physiology are distributed across eight buildings on campus.  The administrative offices are located in the Clare Small building and Carlson Gymnasium. 

The department is internationally recognized in several areas of research. The research activities of the faculty are broadly categorized into two areas: lifespan physiology and stress physiology. Those faculty studying lifespan physiology address questions related to reproduction, development, and aging. In contrast, those faculty studying stress physiology answer questions about the adaptations exhibited by the human body when its integrity is challenged by stress.

IP students have many opportunities to work on research projects with faculty, either in independent study or through the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP). For more information, call UROP at 303-492-2596, or view: http://enrichment.colorado.edu/urop/.

You may also seek honors in integra- tive physiology, which results in the desig- nation of cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude at graduation. Honors work usually involves special coursework and a senior honors research project. Look into this program early because it involves securing a faculty sponsor and developing an individual project.

You may want to consider study abroad at some point during your years as an IP major. Study abroad provides you with the opportunity to study, live, and travel in a foreign country from a few weeks to an academic year, depending on the program selected. The university offers approximately 100 programs throughout the world. These programs enable you to earn credit as if you had taken courses on the Boulder campus, sometimes fulfilling major and core requirements. Language study is a prerequisite for participation in many programs, so early planning for study abroad is essential.

For more information, call the Office of International Education at 303-492-7741 or stop by the Center for Community. The home page address is: http://studyabroad.colorado.edu/.

Please speak with your advisor for specific recommendations; the following is intended to be a general outline only and there may be flexibility to this plan.
 

Integrative Physiology 4-Year Plan
Average 30 credits per year.

NOTE: Scroll to the bottom of the 4-year plan to see important information (pre-requisites, IPHY credit hours, Pre-Health, etc.)

First Year – Fall Semester
EBIO 1210 and 1230
(4): General Biology 1
MATH 1300 or MATH 1310 (5): Calculus *
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Lower Division Written Communication)

First Year – Spring Semester
EBIO 1220 and 1240
(4): General Biology 2
CHEM 1113 and 1114 (5): General Chemistry 1 *
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Historical Context)
Elective/MAPS (3)

० Students may also choose to take the MCDB sequence (Fall MCDB 1150 and 1152, Spring: MCDB 2150 and 2152, and a lab).  An academic advisor can help guide that decision.
* CHEM 1021: Introduction to Chemistry (4) - Prep course for General Chemistry (If this course is needed, we recommend taking it in Spring of your 1st year and starting General Chem 1 in the fall of your sophomore year)
* MATH 1150: Precalculus (4) - Prep course for Calculus 1 (If this course is needed, we recommend taking it in the fall semester of your 1st year and then taking calculus the summer after your first year - talk to an academic advisor about potentially transferring in Calculus)


Second Year – Fall Semester
CHEM 1133 and 1134
(5): General Chemistry 2
IPHY 3410 (3): Anatomy lecture **
IPHY 3415 (2): Anatomy lab **
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Human Diversity)
Elective/MAPS (3)

Second Year – Spring Semester
IPHY 3470
(3): Human Physiology 1
IPHY 2800 (4): Introduction to Statistics
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: United States Context)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Lower Division Literature and the Arts)
Elective/MAPS (3)

** Anatomy lecture is a prerequisite for Physiology 1.  Anatomy lab is not.  Talk to an advisor about a plan that is best for you.


Third Year – Fall Semester
PHYS 2010
(5): General Physics 1
IPHY 3480 (3): Human Physiology 2
IPHY 3435 (2): Human Physiology Lab
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Upper Division Written Communication)
Elective (3): Upper-Division

Third Year – Spring Semester
PHYS 2020
(5): General Physics 2
IPHY Capstone (3-5)
CORE (3): Content Areas of Study (example: Contemporary Societies)
Elective (3): Upper-Division


Fourth Year – Fall Semester
IPHY Capstone
(3-5)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Ideals and Values)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Upper Division Literature and the Arts)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division

Fourth Year – Spring Semester
IPHY Capstone
(3-5)
Elective (3)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division


Other Major Courses/Prereqs/Pertinent Info.

  • Anatomy (IPHY 3410, 3415) has a prereq. of a complete biology sequence
  • Physiology 1 (IPHY 3470) has a prereq. of 1 year of General Chemistry
  • Physiology 1 (IPHY 3470) is a prereq. for Physiology 2 (IPHY 3480) and most of the IPHY Capstone courses (some IPHY Capstone courses have additional prerequisites)
  • Physiology lab (IPHY 3435) has a prereq. of Anatomy lab (IPHY 3415), Physiology 1 (IPHY 3470), Statistics, and recommended coreq. Physiology 2 (IPHY 3480)
  • IPHY Capstones: IPHY 3060 - Cell Physiology; IPHY 4440 - Endocrinology; IPHY 4540 - Biomechanics; IPHY 4600 - Immunology; IPHY 4650 - Exercise Physiology; IPHY 4720 - Neurophysiology

Additional IPHY Courses may be needed to reach a total of 30 hours of IPHY.

Students who plan to pursue a health career or graduate school may need additional courses. We recommend students work with Pre-Health advisors and check the prerequisites of programs they plan to attend to ensure they are adequately prepared.



Please speak with your advisor for specific recommendations; the following is intended to be a general outline only and there may be flexibility to this plan.
 

Integrative Physiology 4-Year Plan
With Added Chemistry^

 

First Year – Fall Semester
EBIO 1210 and 1230
(4): General Biology 1
CHEM 1021 (4): Introduction to Chemistry *
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Lower Division Written Communication)

First Year – Spring Semester
EBIO 1220 and 1240
(4): General Biology 2
CHEM 1113 and 1114 (5): General Chemistry 1 *
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Historical Context)
Elective/MAPS (3)

० Students may also choose to take the MCDB sequence (Fall MCDB 1150 and 1152, Spring: MCDB 2150 and 2152, and a lab).  An academic advisor can help guide that decision.
* CHEM 1021: Introduction to Chemistry (4) - Prep course for General Chemistry

First Year – Summer Semester
MATH 1300 or 1310
(5): Calculus 1*

* MATH 1150: Precalculus (4) - Prep course for Calculus 1 (If this course is needed, we recommend taking it in the fall semester of your 1st year and then taking calculus the summer after your first year - talk to an academic advisor about potentially transferring in Calculus)


Second Year – Fall Semester
CHEM 1133 and 1134
(5): General Chemistry 2
IPHY 3410 (3): Anatomy lecture **
IPHY 3415 (2): Anatomy lab **
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Human Diversity)
Elective/MAPS (3)
 ** Anatomy lecture is a prerequisite for Physiology 1.  Anatomy lab is not.  Talk to an advisor about a plan that is best for you.

Second Year – Spring Semester
CHEM 3311 AND 3321
(5): Organic Chemistry 1 with Lab
IPHY 2800 (4): Introduction to Statistics
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: United States Context)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Lower Division Literature and the Arts)
Elective/MAPS (3)


Third Year – Fall Semester
CHEM 3331 AND 3341
(5): Organic Chemistry 2 with Lab
IPHY 3470 (3): Human Physiology 1
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Upper Division Written Communication)
Elective (3): Upper-Division

Third Year – Spring Semester
IPHY 3480
(3): Human Physiology 2
IPHY 3435 (2): Human Physiology Lab
CHEM 4611 (3): Survey of Biochemistry
CORE (3): Content Areas of Study (example: Contemporary Societies)
Elective (3): Upper-Division

Third Year – Summer Semester
PHYS 2010
(5): General Physics 1


Fourth Year – Fall Semester
PHYS 2020
(5): General Physics 2
IPHY Capstone (3-5)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Ideals and Values)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Upper Division Literature and the Arts)

Fourth Year – Spring Semester
IPHY Capstone
(3-5)
IPHY Capstone (3-5)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division


^It is important to note that this is a suggested route to complete IPHY major requirements with additional Chemistry requirements that may be needed for a graduate health program (medical school, physician assistant school, etc). Students should consult with an Academic Advisor in order to plan their best route to complete these requirements as well as consult with Pre-Health advising.