As a history major studying the past, you will gain an awareness of the variety of past human achievement, as well as a perspective on how the world operates. With this knowledge, you will have a better understanding of the present. In the course of exposing you to the intellectual, political, economic, cultural, and social forces that have influenced today’s world, the study of history also develops your ability to read critically, to ask intelligent questions, and to express ideas orally and in writing. In its broadest sense, the study of history provides you with an intellectual framework and practical skills that will serve all your future pursuits. 

The bachelor of arts (B.A.) program for history majors is structured so that while you are required to receive a broad education in various fields of historical inquiry, you have the freedom to design a program particularly suited to your own interests, provided you choose your classes wisely.  At the lower-division level, you are required to take one introductory course on the history of the United States, on the history of Europe, on the history of another area of the world outside of the U.S. or Europe, and on global history.  At the upper-division level you have greater flexibility because you take more courses, but you also have to take one class on U.S. history, on European history, on the history of another area of the world outside of the U.S. or Europe, and on comparative or global history.  In addition, when choosing courses to fulfill your major requirements, you need to make sure that you take at least two pre-modern history courses and two modern history courses.

While you are required to acquire both geographical and chronological breadth in your major, the requirements are flexible enough that you can concentrate your studies in a specific geographic area (for example Britain, China, Latin America, or the U.S.) or a historical period (for example the Ancient world, the Medieval period, or the twentieth century) or on a single theme (for example intellectual history, the history of revolution, the history of women, imperialism and colonialism, the history of Islam, or Jewish history). Within these areas, you are free to plan your program around a diverse set of rotating course offerings.

An objective of the program is to provide as broad a base as possible for the curriculum. The following historical areas are among those represented: ancient and medieval history; early modern & modern European history; European national histories (Britain, France, Germany, Russia); the history of world areas (Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia & East Asia); American history considered both by periods and by topics (such as diplomatic, social, African-American); Western U.S. history; women’s history; global history, and different historical methodologies.

All majors are required to take a specific historical thinking & writing course, but in all coursework, special attention is paid to skills in critical reading and writing. You are expected to work with source materials, acquire methodical research techniques, and submit clearly written papers and essays. The department encourages students with great interest and ability in history to take part in the departmental honors program.  Qualified students usually complete the honors program during their senior year but, some start their history honors work during their junior year.

The history graduate offers prospective employers a background that is advantageous in many ways. Versatility, good analytical skills, and the ability to view contemporary society with perspective are among the qualities that CU-Boulder history graduates bring to careers in public relations, banking, consulting, journalism, marketing, the government and other public service, and elementary or secondary school teaching.  Also, libraries, museums, historical societies, and national parks may offer attractive history-related career options. History graduates often go on to study in professional schools which leads to careers in law, business, and medicine, and a select few decide to pursue graduate work leading to historical scholarship and teaching at the university level.

Career Services (www.colorado.edu/career) helps students discover who they are, what they want to do, and how to get there. They are the bridge between academics and the world of work. 

Career Services offers free services for all CU-Boulder degree-seeking students, and alumni up to one year after graduation. Meet individually the staff to discuss major and career exploration, internship or job searching, and graduate school preparation.

The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) offers students a chance to work alongside a faculty sponsor on original research.  Though not as common as in the science, UROP history students learn to write proposals, conduct research, pursue creative work, analyze data, and present the results. For more information, call UROP at 303-492-2596, or find it on the web: http://enrichment.colorado.edu/urop/.

The department encourages you to take advantage of the opportunity to study abroad during your undergraduate years.  On-site study can add new dimensions to your perception of world history.   The university offers more than 100 programs around the world, and you may spend from a few weeks to a full academic year abroad, depending on the program selected. You may earn credit that counts as if you had taken courses here, in some cases fulfilling major and core requirements. Note however, that 12 upper-division history credits must be taken in classes taught by CU-Boulder faculty.  Language study is a prerequisite for participation in many of the best programs, so early planning for study abroad is essential.  For more information, call the Office of International Education at 303-492-7741 or stop by the Center for Community. Find their home page: http://studyabroad.colorado.edu/.

Please speak with your advisor for specific recommendations; the following is intended to be a general outline only and there may be flexibility to this plan.
 

History 4-Year Plan
Average 30 credits per year.

 

First Year – Fall Semester
HIST
(3): 1000 Level European History course (Also fulfills Core Historical Context, see Degree Audit for choices)
HIST (3): 1015 or 1025 US History (Also fulfills Core US Context)
HIST (3): 1000-level Major course with focus before 1800 (see degree audit for choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Ideals & Values)
Elective/MAPS (3)

First Year – Spring Semester
HIST
(3): 1000-Level World Areas course (See Degree Audit for choices)
HIST (3): Ancillary Writing requirement (Also fulfills Core Lower-Division Written Communication, see Degree Audit for choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Lower-Division Literature & the Arts)
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Quantitative Reasoning & Mathematic Skills)
Elective/MAPS (3)


Second Year – Fall Semester
HIST 1800
(3) Intro to Global History
HIST (3): 1000 or 4000-leve Major Course with a focus before 1800 (see Degree Audit for choices)
CORE (4): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science with Lab)  
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Human Diversity)
Elective/MAPS (3)

Second Year – Spring Semester
HIST
(3): 4000-leve Major Course with a focus after 1800 (see Degree Audit for choices)
HIST 3020 (3): Historical Thinking and Writing
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science)  
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Contemporary Societies)
Elective/MAPS (3)


Third Year – Fall Semester
HIST
(3):  4000-level World Areas course (See Degree Audit for choices)
HIST (3):  4000-level US History course (See Degree Audit for choices)
HIST (3): 4000-leve Major Course with a focus after 1800 (see Degree Audit for choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science)  
Elective (3):

Third Year – Spring Semester
HIST
(3):  4000-level European History course (See Degree Audit for choices)
HIST (3):  4000-level Comparative or Global History course (See Degree Audit for choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Upper-Division Literature and Arts)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science)
Elective (3): Upper-Division


Fourth Year – Fall Semester
HIST
(3):  3000-level Senior Seminar (see Degree Audit for choices)
HIST (3):  4000-level course
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3):

Fourth Year – Spring Semester
HIST
(3):  4000-level course
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3):