Economics is a quantitative policy oriented social science with a highly developed body of theory and a wide range of real-world applications. Economists describe the process by which scarce resources are utilized to attain individual and societal goals. Economists also predict the consequences of changes in economic activities and government policies. Theoretical models, knowledge of economic and policymaking institutions, quantitative analysis, and the examination of data are all part of this discipline. 

In general, economists are interested in the economic behavior of individuals. Investigations of the daily decisions consumers, workers, and firm managers make as well as the interactions and impacts of such decisions in specific markets are the subjects of Microeconomics

Macroeconomics refers to the analysis of overall economic activity in many markets, a region, a country or globally.  Some of the specific issues of macroeconomics include economic growth, inflation, recession, unemployment and government intervention in the economy. 

There are many interesting applications within economics, including international trade and finance, environment and natural resources, public policy, labor, economic development, economic history, industrial organization, mathematical and statistical methods, urban and regional economics and economic regulation.  See the Department website:  http://colorado.edu/economics for elective course lists, prerequisites and syllabi. 

The economics program offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. The central core of the economics degree includes economic theory, statistics, and econometrics. Course work in mathematics, including calculus, is required. Intermediate micro- and/or macroeconomic theory must be completed before enrolling in related elective coursework. You may further enhance your degree by adding an emphasis in business, international, quantitative, or public economics. See: http://www.colorado.edu/Economics/undergraduate/major-emphasis.html

Economists hold positions in both the public and private sectors. Economics graduates use their skills in areas such as education, finance, budgetary forecasting, banking, insurance, market analysis, research, sales and technical writing. 
If you pursue post-graduate education you will be well prepared for graduate study in economics, business, law, education, management, public policy, international affairs, nonprofit work and teaching. 

Career Services (www.colorado.edu/career) helps students discover who they are, what they want to do, and how to get there. They are the bridge between academics and the world of work.

Career Services offers free services for all CU-Boulder degree-seeking students, and alumni up to one year after graduation. Meet individually the staff to discuss major and career exploration, internship or job searching, and graduate school preparation.

There are a number of special programs/services for economics majors. The Department offers a free tutorial lab each semester and a computer lab. Qualified seniors can enroll in the department’s honors program, which includes an honors seminar and completion of an honors thesis. Honors designation at graduation includes cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude. Consider the honors program by the second semester of your junior year. 

The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) offers students a chance to work alongside a faculty sponsor on original research. Learn to write proposals, conduct research, pursue creative work, analyze data and present the results. For more information, call UROP at 303-735-6802 and online at http://enrichment.colorado.edu/urop/

As an economics major, you may enter a combined “double degree” program with business, engineering, journalism, architecture or music. The Department of Economics also offers a minor, as described on the following page. In addition, there are certificate programs in actuarial studies and quantitative finance offered in cooperation with the Department of Mathematics and the Leeds School of Business. 

The university offers more than 100 study abroad programs throughout the world–many for academic credit. You may spend a few weeks to a full academic year abroad, depending on the program you select. Prior language study or other prerequisites are necessary for some programs, so early planning for study abroad is essential.  It is best to take study abroad economics courses after completion of intermediate micro and macro theory.  Further information about study abroad is available from the Office of International Education which is located in the Center for Community, call at 303-492-7741, or visit the web: (http://studyabroad.colorado.edu/).

Please speak with your advisor for specific recommendations; the following is intended to be a general outline only and there may be flexibility to this plan.
 

Economics Major 4-Year Plan

NOTE: This example will outline the major requirements, but the order of some of your classes can vary greatly.  It is important to check your Degree Audit and work with your major advisor each semester to make sure you are aware of your requirements and graduation timeline.  This is especially true of students with added majors, minors, or certificates.

First Year – Fall Semester
ECON 2010
(4): Principles of Microeconomics (fulfills Core Contemporary Societies)
ECON MATH (3): per math placement; see Degree Audit for options
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (suggested: Lower-Division Written Communication)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (see Degree Audit for options)
Elective or MAPS if needed (3)   

First Year – Spring Semester
ECON 2020
(4): Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON MATH if needed (3): see Degree Audit for options
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (see Degree Audit for options)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (see Degree Audit for options)
Elective or MAPS if needed (3)


Second Year – Fall Semester
ECON 3070
(4): Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
ECON 3818 (4): Introduction to Statistics with Computer Applications
CORE (3): Natural Science (http://www.colorado.edu/artsandsciences/student-resources/core-curriculum/natural-science)
Elective (3)

Second Year – Spring Semester
ECON 3080
(4): Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
CORE (3): Natural Science
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (see Degree Audit for options)
Elective (3)
Elective (3)


Third Year – Fall Semester
ECON 4818 or 4848
(3): Introduction to Econometrics or Applied Econometrics
ECON (3): 4000-level elective
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (suggested: Upper-Division Written Communication)
CORE (4): Natural Science with lab
Elective (3): Upper-Division

Third Year – Spring Semester
ECON
(3): 4000-level elective
CORE (3): Natural Science
CORE (3): Content Area (suggested: Upper-Division Literature and Arts)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3)


Fourth Year – Fall Semester
ECON
(3): 4000-level elective
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (see Degree Audit for options)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3)
Elective (3)

Fourth Year – Spring Semester
ECON
(3): 4000-level elective
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3)
Elective (3)