“Who designed the water faucet? How did a Caesarean section get its name? Was Homer really blind? Why should you beware of Greeks bearing gifts? The answers to these and many other questions are yours for the knowing if you major in Classics - the study of the languages, literatures, and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome. A Classics major offers the opportunity to explore the beliefs and achievements of antiquity, and to learn just how profoundly they still affect contemporary civilization. If you major in Classics, you’ll learn Greek or Latin (or both).... You’ll also read the great literary and philosophical works composed in these languages. You’ll study ancient art, architecture, and technology, too, and you’ll learn about Greek and Roman legal systems, social institutions, religious practices, and class distinctions.” - The Princeton Review

Classics at CU ranks among the most vibrant programs in humanistic studies at the University of Colorado, a department in which students at every level are challenged to integrate the world of scholarship into their daily lives. We are multicultural, because we study the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome, but also the many peoples with whom the Greeks and Romans interacted in central and eastern Europe, north Africa, Egypt, and the Middle East. We are interdisciplinary because faculty and students in the department cross the boundaries of literature, philosophy, material culture, history, and religion to study the world of antiquity. We also cover area studies because our field encompasses the Mediterranean basin and the regions that border it. The department offers courses in language and literature, ancient history, art and archaeology, and philosophy within several programs of study at the undergraduate and graduate levels. With more than a hundred undergraduate majors and minors pursuing one of the several tracks offered within the department, ours is one of the most successful undergraduate Classics programs in the nation.

The University of Colorado Department of Classics offers a complete sequence of courses in ancient Greek and Latin and a variety of courses in English translation on the literature, philosophy, history, art and archaeology of the ancient world. These courses are for students who are looking to fulfill their requirements in the Core Curriculum or major in Classics, desiring to learn an ancient language or just interested in the world of antiquity. The Classics major and our minor are very flexible; to a great degree you can tailor them to your own needs and interests. Our faculty care about you as students, know who you are, and will do all we can to help you prosper in your chosen path.

“We can’t overestimate the value of a Classics major. Check this out: according to the Association of American Medical Colleges, students who major or double-major in Classics have a better success rate getting into medical school than do students who concentrate solely in biology, microbiology, and other branches of science. Crazy, huh? Furthermore, according to Harvard Magazine, Classics majors (and math majors) have the highest success rates of any majors in law school. Believe it or not: political science, economics, and pre-law majors lag fairly far behind. Even furthermore, Classics majors consistently have some of the highest scores on GREs of all undergraduates.

“Shocked? Don’t be. One reason Classics majors are so successful is that they completely master grammar. Medical terminology, legal terminology, and all those ridiculously worthless vocabulary words on the GRE (and the SAT) have their roots in Greek and Latin. Ultimately, though, Classics majors get on well in life because they develop intellectual rigor, communications skills, analytical skills, the ability to handle complex information, and, above all, a breadth of view which few other disciplines can provide.” - The Princeton Review

You will graduate in Classics with terrific job skills because you have learned not only to pay attention to detail and to memorize facts but also to analyze and interpret; because, through your study of Latin and Greek, your knowledge of language and its use will be vastly improved; and because you have pondered the irrational, noble, corrupt, idealistic, mundane, and creative qualities that characterize the contributions of ancient Greece and Rome to world culture.

Many of our majors at CU go on to graduate school in Classics, Archaeology, English, History, Comparative Literature, Philosophy, Information Science, or Museum Studies. Alumni who began their careers as Classics majors have also gone on to become doctors, lawyers, teachers and administrators, members of the diplomatic service, engineers, businesswomen and men, and entrepreneurs of all types. Undergraduates interested in law or medicine will be especially pleased to discover that law schools and medical schools have a long history of accepting Classics students.

We enjoy a close relationship with Career Services and encourage you to contact them to learn more about the programs and services they offer that are designed to help you plan your career, including workshops, internships, and placement services after graduation. For an appointment with a career counselor or for more information, call 303-492-6541, stop by the Center for Community, or check out http://careerservices.colorado.edu/public/.

The Classics Department office is in the Eaton Humanities building, where you’ll also find our department library that doubles as a special study area — with gorgeous views and a wrap-around balcony! Our classes are taught in state-of-the-art classrooms, in the CU Art Museum, or onsite in foreign locations.  We are proud to offer extra funding opportunties to our majors, too (http://classics.colorado.edu/fellowships-and-grants/.)

The Classics Department maintains an active archeological field school, providing opportunities for archeological experience and course credit for students. Excavation, survey, artifact analysis, drafting, registration, photography and electronic recording possibilities all form part of the field school’s offerings.

In addition, the Classics Department works with collections owned by the University of Colorado in classes and to create on-line exhibits that make these artifacts available to the public at large. Faculty and students work together to conduct research on the artifacts and their broader implications.

We have an active and thriving undergraduate Classics Club that fosters community, offers special events such as trips to museums, plays or movies, provides tutoring in case of need, and hosts special meetings with such groups as Study Abroad or Career Services. Your fellow Classicists are terrific people who are highly involved and engaged with the campus and local communities! In addition, Classics is fortunate to have professional support through Academic Advising for both first-year students and upper-level students, and also to have a specific faculty advisor within the department who is there to help you with your individual needs and plans. Your success is our goal.

Classics strongly encourages students to study abroad at any of CU’s approved programs that offer Classics (many of them do). With particular emphasis on the study of Classics, the University of Colorado is a member of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome (ICCS) and the College Year in Athens program (CYA). ICCS offers courses in Greek, Latin, ancient history, archaeology, art, Renaissance and Baroque art history, and Italian. CYA offers courses in ancient and modern Greek, Latin, ancient history, archaeology, modern Greek culture, and eastern Mediterranean studies. Both programs offer semester-long and year-long study. See http://studyabroad.colorado.edu/.

We also strongly encourage students to take advantage of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP), offering students a chance to work with a faculty sponsor on original research. Get paid to do research! Learn to write proposals, conduct research, pursue creative work, analyze data, and present the results. For more information, call UROP at 303-492-2596 or check http://enrichment.colorado.edu/urop/.

Please speak with your advisor for specific recommendations; the following is intended to be a general outline only and there may be flexibility to this plan.
 

Classics, Track 1
Average 30 credits per year.

 

First Year – Fall Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Beginning Latin or Greek I (If needed, does not count toward 30 credit language requirement)
CLAS (3) Elective Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Quantitative Reasoning & Mathematic Skills)
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Lower Division Written Communication)
Elective/MAPS (3)

First Year – Spring Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Beginning Latin or Greek II (If needed, does not count toward 30 credit language requirement)
CLAS (3) Elective Course
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science  http://www.colorado.edu/artsandsciences/student-resources/core-curriculum/natural-science)
Elective/MAPS (3)
Elective/MAPS (3)


Second Year – Fall Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Intermediate/Accelerated Latin or Greek I
GREK/LATN (3) Elective (See website for choices, http://www.colorado.edu/classics/courses)
CORE/Elective (3): Content Area of Study (example: Human Diversity)
CORE/Elective (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science)
Elective/MAPS (3)

Second Year – Spring Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Intermediate/Accelerated Latin or Greek II
GREK/LATN (3) Elective (See website for choices, http://www.colorado.edu/classics/courses)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science)
Elective/MAPS (3)
Elective/MAPS (3)


Third Year – Fall Semester
GREK/LATN
(3) Elective (See website for choices, http://www.colorado.edu/classics/courses)
GREK/LATN (3) Elective (See website for choices, http://www.colorado.edu/classics/courses)
CORE (4): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science with lab)  
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Upper-Division Written Communication)
Elective (3): Upper-Division

Third Year – Spring Semester
GREK/LATN
(3) Elective (See website for choices, http://www.colorado.edu/classics/courses)
GREK/LATN (3) Elective (See website for choices, http://www.colorado.edu/classics/courses)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Ideals and Values)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division


Fourth Year – Fall Semester
GREK/LATN
(3) Elective (See website for choices, http://www.colorado.edu/classics/courses)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: United States Context)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division

Fourth Year – Spring Semester
GREK/LATN
(3) Elective (See website for choices, http://www.colorado.edu/classics/courses)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Contemporary Societies)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3)
Elective (3)


Please speak with your advisor for specific recommendations; the following is intended to be a general outline only and there may be flexibility to this plan.
 

Classics, Track 2
Average 30 credits per year.

 

First Year – Fall Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Beginning Latin or Greek I (If needed, does not count toward 30 credit language requirement)
CLAS (3) Literature, Culture, and Thought Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Quantitative Reasoning & Mathematic Skills)
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Lower Division Written Communication)
Elective/MAPS (3)

First Year – Spring Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Beginning Latin or Greek II (If needed, does not count toward 30 credit language requirement)
CLAS (3) Literature, Culture, and Thought Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science  http://www.colorado.edu/artsandsciences/student-resources/core-curriculum/natural-science)
Elective/MAPS (3)
Elective/MAPS (3)


Second Year – Fall Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Intermediate/Accelerated Latin or Greek I
CLAS (3) Literature, Culture, and Thought Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE/Elective (3): Content Area of Study (example: Human Diversity)
CORE/Elective (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science)
Elective/MAPS (3)

Second Year – Spring Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Intermediate/Accelerated Latin or Greek II
CLAS (3) Literature, Culture, and Thought Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CLAS (3) Ancient History, Art, and Archeology Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science)
Elective/MAPS (3)


Third Year – Fall Semester
CLAS
(3) Literature, Culture, and Thought Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (4): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science with lab)  
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Upper-Division Written Communication)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3)

Third Year – Spring Semester
CLAS
(3) Literature, Culture, and Thought Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Ideals and Values)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3)


Fourth Year – Fall Semester
CLAS
(3) Ancient History, Art, and Archeology Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: United States Context)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division

Fourth Year – Spring Semester
CLAS
(3) Ancient History, Art, and Archeology Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Contemporary Societies)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3)
Elective (3)


Please speak with your advisor for specific recommendations; the following is intended to be a general outline only and there may be flexibility to this plan.
 

Classics, Track 3
Average 30 credits per year.

 

First Year – Fall Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Beginning Latin or Greek I (If needed, does not count toward 30 credit language requirement)
CLAS (3) Ancient History, Art, and Archeology Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Quantitative Reasoning & Mathematic Skills)
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Lower Division Written Communication)
Elective/MAPS (3)

First Year – Spring Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Beginning Latin or Greek II (If needed, does not count toward 30 credit language requirement)
CLAS (3) Ancient History, Art, and Archeology Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science  http://www.colorado.edu/artsandsciences/student-resources/core-curriculum/natural-science)
Elective/MAPS (3)
Elective/MAPS (3)


Second Year – Fall Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Intermediate/Accelerated Latin or Greek I
CLAS (3) Ancient History, Art, and Archeology Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE/Elective (3): Content Area of Study (example: Human Diversity)
CORE/Elective (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science)
Elective/MAPS (3)

Second Year – Spring Semester
LATN/GREK
(4) Intermediate/Accelerated Latin or Greek II
CLAS (3) Literature, Culture, and Thought Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CLAS (3) Ancient History, Art, and Archeology Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science)
Elective/MAPS (3)


Third Year – Fall Semester
CLAS
(3) Ancient History, Art, and Archeology Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (4): Content Area of Study (example: Natural Science with lab)  
CORE (3): Skills Acquisition (example: Upper-Division Written Communication)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3)

Third Year – Spring Semester
CLAS
(3) Ancient History, Art, and Archeology Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Ideals and Values)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3)


Fourth Year – Fall Semester
CLAS
(3) Literature, Culture, and Thought Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: United States Context)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3): Upper-Division

Fourth Year – Spring Semester
CLAS
(3) Literature, Culture, and Thought Course (See Degree Audit for Choices)
CORE (3): Content Area of Study (example: Contemporary Societies)
Elective (3): Upper-Division
Elective (3)
Elective (3)