Social Sciences

Equations connect ancient settlements to modern cities, says CU-Boulder anthropologist

Visitors to the ancient city of Teotihuacan—with its pyramidal structures arranged in careful geometric patterns, its temples, and its massive central thoroughfare, dubbed Street of the Dead—in Mexico may have the sensation they’re gazing at the remains of a society profoundly different from their own.
 
But new research from anthropologists armed with a bevy of recently derived mathematical equations shows that in some fundamental ways, today’s cities and yesterday’s settlements may be more alike than different.

Team that planned torch relay across Russia is led by CU alum

The Olympic torch will arrive in Sochi for the 2014 Winter Olympics after a 123-day relay across Russia, and the team that planned the torch relay is led by a CU-Boulder alumnus with a particular passion and worldwide renown for this work.

NSF fellows tackle research ranging from cystic fibrosis treatment to a better hip replacement

This fall, the University of Colorado Boulder is again hosting a large class of National Science Foundation fellows. Twenty-six new graduate researchers have received NSF fellowships, bringing the total number of NSF fellows on campus to 101, a new record for CU-Boulder.

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program is one of the most prestigious awards available for student researchers in the country. This year CU-Boulder was among the top 20 universities enrolling NSF fellows.

Diet likely changed game for some hominids 3.5 million years ago, says CU-Boulder study

A new look at the diets of ancient African hominids shows a “game changer” occurred about 3.5 million years ago when some members added grasses or sedges to their menus, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

CU-Boulder prof works to shrink error margins in U.S. census data

A person searching through the massive expanse of data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau in search of details about a specific neighborhood may increasingly find statistics with colossal margins of error, such as an average income of $50,000 plus or minus $50,000.

A geographer at the University of Colorado Boulder, one of eight nodes of the National Science Foundation’s newly created Census Research Network, has been granted a five-year $1.4 million grant to see if he can change that.

Student life: Finding a community on campus

At first, Kisori Thomas had a difficult time acclimating to the campus climate at CU-Boulder.  Initially, other than her coursework, she wasn’t active outside the classroom.

Realizing she wanted a more well-rounded education, experience and personal growth, she took a big step outside her comfort zone and began looking for student leadership and multicultural organizations to join. This also included studying abroad in Chicoutimi, Canada, for a five-week French intensive program.

Congress works better than many think, new research shows

Self-manufactured crises -- like the looming "fiscal cliff" -- may help Congress get work done, according to a new book co-authored by Professor Scott Adler.

Alum builds tiny house on big philosophical ground

HARTSEL, Colo.—Christopher Smith knew he wanted to sink down some roots, preferably on a mountainside. He just didn’t know that the process would require so much time, sweat and money.

“I pretty much had no construction experience,” Smith said. “I didn’t own any tools, so there was a pretty big learning curve.”

Researchers unearth ancient bronze artifact in Alaska

A team of researchers led by the University of Colorado Boulder recently discovered the first prehistoric bronze artifact made from a cast ever found in Alaska, a small, buckle-like object found in an ancient Eskimo dwelling and which likely originated in East Asia.

People respond to immediate emotions in charitable giving

When considering giving money to humanitarian crises people often donate in response to events that grab their immediate emotions, according to a recent study by CU-Boulder psychology professor Leaf Van Boven.

"The question we wanted to answer with our study is what is the impact of people's emotions on their decisions to make charitable donations," Van Boven said. "We demonstrated that people act on what is immediately emotionally arousing to them. In other words, they respond to what makes them upset in the here and now."

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