Institutes

Bringing native greenback cutthroats back from the brink of extinction

Seated high in the Rocky Mountains west of Fort Collins, Zimmerman Lake was abuzz last week, and not just from the swarms of pesky mosquitos that had a heyday dive-bombing visitors.

Instead, scientists and students from the University of Colorado Boulder and fisheries biologists and managers from state and federal natural resource agencies were focused on the inhabitants of a water tank in the back of a Colorado Parks and Wildlife fish-stocking truck. Inside were hundreds of colorful trout known as greenback cutthroats, about to be released into their native river drainage after vanishing for decades.

Creating 'Visionarias': CU-Boulder student helps empower young Peruvian women

Earlier this year, about 30 young Peruvian women walked as many as 10 hours to gather in Urubamba, a village located just south of the Incan sanctuary of Machu Picchu in Peru’s Sacred Valley.

The women, whose average age was 18, made the long journey to participate in the Visionary Leadership Institute, organized with the help of Abigale Stangl, a University of Colorado Boulder doctoral student.

Front Range oil and gas operations leak 3x more than estimated

During two days of intensive airborne measurements, oil and gas operations in Colorado’s Front Range leaked nearly three times as much methane, a greenhouse gas, as predicted based on inventory estimates, and seven times as much benzene, a regulated air toxic.

JILA atomic clock sets new world records

Feeling out of synch? The world’s most precise clock is now located on the CU-Boulder campus.

In a laboratory at JILA—a joint institute of CU-Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology—researchers have developed a new strontium atomic clock that has set world records for both precision and stability. It “ticks” 430 trillion times per second.   

Severe 2012 solar storm narrowly missed Earth

A massive ejection of material from the sun initially traveling at over 7 million miles per hour that narrowly missed Earth last year is an event solar scientists hope will open the eyes of policymakers regarding the impacts and mitigation of severe space weather, says a University of Colorado Boulder professor.

Tallgrass prairie restoration could be bolstered by understanding rare microbes

In the first half of the nineteenth century, American settlers pushed westward into the Great Plains, lured to the prairies by the agricultural promise of their dark, rich soils.

Within a century, America’s tallgrass prairies—which once stretched across more than 150 million acres, from Minnesota south to Texas and from Illinois west to Nebraska—had all but vanished under settlers’ plows. The demise of the tallgrass prairie also meant the demise of dozens of species of grasses that could grow to the height of a man, hundreds of species of flowers and herds of roaming bison.

CU-Boulder instrument set to launch to the moon

A $6 million University of Colorado Boulder instrument designed to study the behavior of lunar dust will be riding on a NASA mission to the moon now slated for launch on Friday, Sept. 6, from the agency’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

New mobile technology can test for agricultural pathogens in Africa

A University of Colorado Boulder faculty member will travel to Africa later this month to test a mobile smartphone technology developed by his team to rapidly detect and track natural carcinogens, including aflatoxin, which is estimated to contaminate up to 25 percent of the global food supply and cause severe illnesses in humans and animals.

Oldest North American petroglyphs dated to at least 10,500 years ago

A new high-tech analysis led by a University of Colorado Boulder researcher shows the oldest known petroglyphs in North America, which are cut into several boulders in western Nevada, date to at least 10,500 years ago and perhaps even as far back as 14,800 years ago.

NASA mission involving CU-Boulder discovers particle accelerator in heart of Van Allen radiation belts

Using data from a NASA satellite, a team of scientists led by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and involving the University of Colorado Boulder have discovered a massive particle accelerator in the heart of one of the harshest regions of near-Earth space, a region of super-energetic, charged particles surrounding the globe known as the Van Allen radiation belts.

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