Health

Working the night shift burns less energy and increases risk of weight gain

People who work the night shift are likely burning less energy during a 24-hour period than those on a normal schedule, increasing their risk for weight gain and obesity, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

Researchers have known that people who work, and therefore eat, at night when their bodies are biologically prepared to sleep are prone to put on pounds. But the reasons have not been clear.

Running really can keep you young

If you are an active senior who wants to stay younger, keep on running.

A new study involving the University of Colorado Boulder and Humboldt State University shows that senior citizens who run several times a week for exercise expend about the same amount of energy walking as a typical 20-year-old.

Trying to eat healthy? Read those nutrition labels carefully

People who made New Year’s resolutions to eat healthier or lose weight might also want to brush up on their math skills.

In a new study, marketing professor Donald Lichtenstein found that nutrition labels on packaged food products in the United States can lead even the most health-conscious consumers astray, if they don’t “do the math.”

Snake oil to treat heart disease? Idea may not be so far-fetched

Doctors prescribing snake oil for their patients?  The scenario may not be as far-fetched as it sounds.

A University of Colorado Boulder study has shown that huge amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding pythons promote healthy heart growth. The team found the amount of triglycerides -- the main constituent of natural fats and oils -- in the blood of Burmese pythons one day after eating increased by more than fifty-fold, said CU-Boulder Professor Leslie Leinwand, who led the study.

Give FeedbackSee More Photos View Photo