Graduate School

Creating 'Visionarias': CU-Boulder student helps empower young Peruvian women

Earlier this year, about 30 young Peruvian women walked as many as 10 hours to gather in Urubamba, a village located just south of the Incan sanctuary of Machu Picchu in Peru’s Sacred Valley.

The women, whose average age was 18, made the long journey to participate in the Visionary Leadership Institute, organized with the help of Abigale Stangl, a University of Colorado Boulder doctoral student.

Award-winning student video seeks to inspire would-be scientists

University of Colorado Boulder graduate student Emi Tokuda is trying to find effective ways to battle melanoma, a notoriously drug-resistant disease that is responsible for 75 percent of all skin cancer-related deaths. She is the subject of one of a slew of videos recently produced for LabTV, and filmed by Emilie Johnson, a graduate student in journalism at CU-Boulder. The video was recently named a Finalist Award Winner by LabTV at the Tribeca Film Festival.

CU-Boulder students invest $30,000 in startup through real-life venture capital program

Elihuu, a startup company whose slogan is “meet your manufacturer,” has met an investor -- a group of University of Colorado Boulder graduate students.

The students last week put $30,000 into Elihuu, an online software platform that connects product designers with manufacturers who can make their wares.

NSF fellows tackle research ranging from cystic fibrosis treatment to a better hip replacement

This fall, the University of Colorado Boulder is again hosting a large class of National Science Foundation fellows. Twenty-six new graduate researchers have received NSF fellowships, bringing the total number of NSF fellows on campus to 101, a new record for CU-Boulder.

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program is one of the most prestigious awards available for student researchers in the country. This year CU-Boulder was among the top 20 universities enrolling NSF fellows.

The bacterial bunch: Parents, kids and dogs trade microbes

As much as dog owners love their children, they tend to share more of themselves, at least in terms of bacteria, with their canine cohorts rather than their kids.

CU-Boulder student finds incubators have wildly varying magnetic fields

Lucas Portelli, a doctoral student in the University of Colorado Boulder’s Department of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, wanted to know how electromagnetic fields affect living things.

To find the answer, he went about building experiments. He tried to test the impact of the fields on E. coli, on cancer cells, on fruit flies and even on mice. But he quickly ran into a problem: The magnetic fields in the biological incubators he was using weren’t consistent. In fact, they weren’t even close.

Can plants be altruistic? You bet, says new CU-Boulder-led study

We’ve all heard examples of animal altruism: Dogs caring for orphaned kittens, chimps sharing food or dolphins nudging injured mates to the surface. Now, a study led by the University of Colorado Boulder suggests some plants are altruistic too.

High-altitude research at CU-Boulder demands dedication, athleticism

A special kind of high-altitude athleticism is needed to work in Colorado's most extreme environments. For CU-Boulder scientists like ecology & evolutionary biology (EBIO) graduate student Courtney Naff, it's an inspiring place to push the boundaries of body and mind. This is an extended version of the story first broadcast on the Pac-12 Network.

Nobel Prize-winner David Wineland praised as mentor to CU-Boulder graduate students

David J. Wineland, a lecturer in the University of Colorado Boulder physics department who today won the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics, was described as both “brilliant and humble” by one of his former graduate students.

CU student investigates biochar for water treatment in developing countries

A variety of public health issues plague the refugees from Burma living on the Thai border, not the least of which is drinking water contaminated by bacteria and pesticides. Yet few low-cost, sustainable and appropriate treatment technologies are available to people in rural and developing communities to ensure water safety.

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