Computer Science

Correcting for the weather: Studying how wind, rain can affect cycling performance

Last fall, computer science major and avid cyclist William Luce and a friend turned their bikes east onto Niwot Road north of Boulder.

“There was a storm blowing in and there was a 40 mph wind coming right off the foothills and blowing straight east,” he said. “We pedaled as hard as we could with this tailwind at our backs.”

When Luce got back home, he uploaded the GPS data he’d recorded during his ride to an online program called Strava, which compared his performance to all other cyclists who had ever ridden and recorded their times for that section of road in the past.

CU-Boulder researchers use video games to spark kids' interest in coding

In grade school classrooms across the country, students have been hard at work this semester trying to figure out how to smash a virtual frog with a virtual truck. They’re building their own video games—inspired by the 1980s classic Frogger—and there are a thousand details to work out. 

In the end, the students will have built a video game. But more important, the students will have learned how to code—whether they knew it at the time or not.

Next-generation Wi-Fi service available on campus buses

CU-Boulder researchers are helping develop the next generation of the Internet—a more mobile version—and the campus’ Office of Information Technology is using this new technology to provide mobile wireless Internet service on campus buses.

The university recently used the WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) wireless protocol to extend its wireless network to the campus buses running between the main Boulder campus and student residence halls at Williams Village, located about a mile to the east.

Saving lives with online communications

A new approach to social media called “Tweak the Tweet,” conceived by CU-Boulder graduate student Kate Starbird and deployed by members of CU’s Project EPIC research group and colleagues around the nation, helped Haiti relief efforts by providing standardized syntax for Twitter communications.

Through consistent use of specially placed keywords, or “hashtags,” in Twitter posts to communicate critical information such as location, status, and road conditions, the “Tweak the Tweet” approach made information computationally easier to extract and collate.

Give FeedbackSee More Photos View Photo