Community Outreach

Alternative Breaks Program connects CU students to communities

This spring break, CU-Boulder's Alternative Breaks Program has sent students far and wide to engage in community-based service projects.

CU-Boulder researchers use video games to spark kids' interest in coding

In grade school classrooms across the country, students have been hard at work this semester trying to figure out how to smash a virtual frog with a virtual truck. They’re building their own video games—inspired by the 1980s classic Frogger—and there are a thousand details to work out. 

In the end, the students will have built a video game. But more important, the students will have learned how to code—whether they knew it at the time or not.

Law School students teach state high school students about Constitution

CU Law School student Jocelyn Jenks so enjoyed going out to teach state high school students about the Constitution in 2012 that she came back this year to participate as an alumna.

“The experience was wonderful, and I jumped at the opportunity to work with high school students again this year,” said Jenks (Law ‘12).

ABCs, 123s and frontal lobes: Neuroscientists share research with kindergartners

When the raw egg plummeted to the playground hardtop at Creekside Elementary School in Boulder, falling exactly 36 inches, the shell shattered and the gooey insides oozed out. The 18 kindergartners looking on were rivited.

A few minutes later, a second egg — this one wrapped in a “helmet” of taped-together bubble wrap and dropped from exactly the same height — fared much better, escaping with its shell still intact.

Breaking ground: CU-Boulder environmental design students get real-world experience

In class one recent Monday, a group of CU-Boulder undergraduates in environmental design met with a city of Boulder official to review their building plans, soon to be constructed by the students at the local Admiral Burke Park. That’s when they learned of a hitch.

The student team can’t build on certain parts of the grounds—those that aren’t owned by the city, which is supporting the project.  

Explaining the link between climate change and pine bark beetles

“On one hand, I’m gonna tell you, ‘This is no big deal, bark beetles have been around for 35 million years, conifers have been around for a lot longer than that, and bark beetles have been killing conifers for 35 million years. There have been epidemics every 30 to 70 years. This is no big deal.’

“Then, on the other hand, I’m gonna tell you, ‘Holy smokes guys, this has never been seen before. Yes, it’s an epidemic, yes, epidemics are natural, but never has there been an epidemic like this as far as biologists have been able to look into the past.”

CU-Boulder home to nationally renowned Shakespeare

Since the opening season more than 50 years ago, the Colorado Shakespeare Festival (CSF) has grown to be more than a summertime Boulder tradition—it has become a nationally recognized Shakespeare festival.

Begun in 1958 with productions of Julius Caesar, Hamlet and the Taming of the Shrew, CSF has played a prominent role in the life of the campus and the Boulder area, serving as a gathering place for theatre lovers.

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