Arts & Humanities

CU takes Shakespeare on the road to spread message of forgiveness in Colorado schools

In "The Tempest," Prospero conjures a mighty storm to shipwreck his enemies on his remote island domain. But as he plots revenge on those who wronged him years before, he ponders his actions and at the last moment turns to forgiveness.

“The rarer action is in virtue rather than vengeance,” Prospero says, renouncing his schemes for payback.

Gifts to Visual Arts Complex create a living space to honor a true friend

In 1998, Deborah Haynes interviewed with Antonette ("Toni") Rosato for a position as a professor of art and art history at CU-Boulder. Not only did Haynes land the job, she began one of the most meaningful friendships of her life.

"Sitting at breakfast that first day," Haynes says," we initiated a tradition of conversation over meals about the mundane details of our lives, but also about art, the wider world, and spiritual life."

Work and conversation brought the two women closer. So it was a shock when Rosato was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer in 2004. 

CU students’ work makes it to the big screen

The work of a talented group of University of Colorado Boulder students and staff has made it to the big screen. The really big screen -- in fact, a more than 20-meter dome.

Homefront Heroines

When Tom Brokaw wrote his paean to the Greatest Generation, he left them out. Filmmaker Ken Burns skipped them when he documented The War.

They are the estimated 100,000 women who joined the military during World War II. The Navy Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service (WAVES), their Coast Guard counterparts, the SPARS, and the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) provided critical support to the American war effort.

English professor helps bring posthumous Ralph Ellison novel to life

Ralph Ellison spent four decades writing but never finishing a novel to follow "Invisible Man," which was a meteoric success in 1952 and remains an American classic. Ellison’s unfinished second novel was published this year, and a CU-Boulder associate professor is one of two editors who brought the legendary author’s work to fruition.

Bullying prevention through Shakespeare

Colorado Shakespeare Festival actors performed a 17th century play in more than 25 schools from Fort Collins to Trinidad last fall to set the stage for modern-day discussions about school bullying. 

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