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CU-Boulder law professors can comment on Supreme Court's decision to hear challenge to health care legislation

November 14, 2011

Richard Collins, professor of law at the CU-Boulder Law School, is an expert in constitutional law. He can be reached at 303-492-5493 or Richard.collins@colorado.edu.

English professor helps bring posthumous Ralph Ellison novel to life

Ralph Ellison spent four decades writing but never finishing a novel to follow "Invisible Man," which was a meteoric success in 1952 and remains an American classic. Ellison’s unfinished second novel was published this year, and a CU-Boulder associate professor is one of two editors who brought the legendary author’s work to fruition.

Sensor developed at CU-Boulder enables plants to say “I’m thirsty”

Corn and potato crops may soon provide information to farmers about when the plants need water and how much should be delivered, due to a CU-Boulder invention. A tiny sensor clipped to plant leaves charts their moisture content, a key measure of water deficiency and accompanying stress. Data from the leaves is sent wirelessly over the Internet to computers linked to irrigation equipment, ensuring timely watering, reducing excessive water and energy use, and potentially saving farmers millions of dollars a year.

CU-Boulder joins the prestigious Pac-12 Conference

CU-Boulder accepted an invitation on June 11, 2010, to join the Pacific-10 Conference as its 11th member, the first new member since 1978; a week later Utah was added and the league will become the Pacific-12 in the coming year. In addition to shared academic excellence, CU-Boulder and the other Pac-10 member institutions hold impressive athletic résumés.

Advancing the uses of laser technology

CU-Boulder professors Margaret Murnane and Henry Kapteyn lead an interdisciplinary research group at JILA, a joint institute of the university and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, where they have made groundbreaking strides in laser science by developing new ultra-fast lasers and X-ray sources for experiments in physics, chemistry, materials science, and engineering. Their pioneering research resulted in the development of ultra-fast optical and coherent soft X-ray sources.

Center for Community delivers state-of-the-art dining and student services

Anchored by a 900-seat street-market style dining hall offering freshly prepared food in nine specialty dining stations, the new Center for Community at CU-Boulder opened for students in August 2010.

The central dining hall is the hub of the 183,000-square-foot student center, which brings together 12 student support offices that had been scattered in buildings and dorms throughout the campus. The offices include Career Services, the Center for Multicultural Affairs, Counseling and Psychological Services, the Office of International Education, and the Office of Victim Assistance.

Research team discovers new kind of bacterial “fingerprint”

Forensic scientists may soon have a valuable new item in their tool kits—a way to identify individuals using unique, telltale types of hand bacteria left behind on objects such as keyboards and computer mice, according to a new CU-Boulder study.

Saving lives with online communications

A new approach to social media called “Tweak the Tweet,” conceived by CU-Boulder graduate student Kate Starbird and deployed by members of CU’s Project EPIC research group and colleagues around the nation, helped Haiti relief efforts by providing standardized syntax for Twitter communications.

Through consistent use of specially placed keywords, or “hashtags,” in Twitter posts to communicate critical information such as location, status, and road conditions, the “Tweak the Tweet” approach made information computationally easier to extract and collate.

Innovative CU-Boulder programs are transforming science and math education

Responding to a national crisis, CU-Boulder is putting a fresh face on how science and math courses are taught. One of those faces is Sarah Berger, who likes teaching and teaches well. But she is neither a faculty member nor a graduate-student teaching assistant. She is a sophomore in biochemistry and a learning assistant— or LA.

As she explains, students are comfortable with her because “they know that I don’t have all the answers either, so they don’t feel like I’ll think their questions are silly or dumb.”

College of Music program encourages tomorrow's music teachers

The Trying on Teaching program at the College of Music is a continuum of teaching and mentoring experiences in which middle school band students are taught by high school students, who are mentored by undergraduate music students, who in turn are advised by graduate music students.

Developed in 2008 by James Austin, professor of music education and associate dean of undergraduate studies, and Peter Miksza, assistant professor of music education, the goal is to attract the next generation of music teachers.

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