Learning & Teaching

Helping K-12 students explore the art of storytelling

Associate Professor William McGinley is no stranger to innovative outreach projects that significantly impact communities, K-12 students and teachers. His latest project, Tell Your Story: Composing a Life, integrates storytelling, creative writing and visual arts in teaching a diverse group of middle school students to memorialize important life experiences.

“The telling of our own life story is the one creative work of art in which we are all engaged,” McGinley said. “This program provides young people with art-based opportunities to imagine and tell their stories.”

Engineering students help to improve quality of life in developing communities

Fourteen graduate students from the Engineering for Developing Communities program at CU-Boulder traveled abroad this past summer to gain field experience in community development.

The students partnered with nonprofit organizations, private companies and universities for 4- to 12-week practicum experiences in Guatemala, Nicaragua, Peru, Bolivia, Uganda, Nepal and China.

Next-generation Wi-Fi service available on campus buses

CU-Boulder researchers are helping develop the next generation of the Internet—a more mobile version—and the campus’ Office of Information Technology is using this new technology to provide mobile wireless Internet service on campus buses.

The university recently used the WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) wireless protocol to extend its wireless network to the campus buses running between the main Boulder campus and student residence halls at Williams Village, located about a mile to the east.

Residence hall helps students gain understanding of sustainable design

CU-Boulder’s newest residence hall, Williams Village North, welcomed students this fall for the first time, many of whom will be learning about the building’s sustainable design through two new Residential Academic Programs (RAPs) that are housed in the residence hall.

Undergraduate student gains hands-on experience in disease ecology

They’re called cowboys, but you won’t find them astride a horse rounding up stray cattle. They are scientists—dubbed disease cowboys—who search for the cause when unknown diseases break out in remote locales.

Ian Buller, a CU-Boulder senior majoring in ecology and evolutionary biology, has his sights set on being one of these daring “disease cowboys” and to specialize in disease ecology, specifically identifying and studying disease emergence and designing control programs.

Professional mentoring program connects business students with role models

The first group of students and mentors to participate in the Leeds School of Business Professional Mentorship Program (PMP) were honored in a celebration this past spring.

Architecture student turns scholarships into community impact

Shane Baldauf, an architecture and environmental design major at CU-Boulder who is dedicated to “green” and affordable housing, has been awarded a prestigious Udall Scholarship.

“Not only is ‘green’ construction good for the environment, but homes that perform more efficiently benefit the occupants too,” said Baldauf. “If you think about it, the people who most need affordable housing are also the ones who need the lowest utility bills, and we’re working to provide that situation through Habitat for Humanity houses.”

CU-Boulder professor awarded Ireland's top science prize

November 03, 2011

University of Colorado Boulder Distinguished Professor Margaret Murnane has been awarded Ireland's top science award, the RDS Irish Times Boyle Medal for Scientific Excellence, for her pioneering work that has transformed the field of ultrafast laser and X-ray science.

2011 CU Diversity and Inclusion Summit presents 'Taking the Next Step'

November 01, 2011

The University of Colorado Boulder and CU System's annual Diversity and Inclusion Summit will be hosted on the Boulder campus on Nov. 8-10. The summit features a variety of sessions for students, faculty, staff and community members.

CU-Boulder python study may have implications for human heart health

October 27, 2011

A surprising new University of Colorado Boulder study shows that huge amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding pythons promote healthy heart growth, results that may have implications for treating human heart disease.

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