Discovery & Innovation

Insect eye-inspired camera captures wide view with no distortion

When praying mantises, dragonflies, ants and other insects peer out at the world, their bulging, compound eyes allow them to see an incredibly wide field of view with an almost infinite depth of field.

Imitating the functionality of an insect eye — which is really a collection of many tinier eyes, known as ommatidia — in a camera has been a long sought-after goal for engineers. Now, camera lenses with wide fields of view, such as fisheye lenses, create distortion around the edges of the image.

Dusinberre, Douglass named President's Teaching Scholars

Three University of Colorado professors have been chosen as 2013 President’s Teaching Scholars, educators who have skillfully integrated teaching and research at a high level throughout their careers at CU.

The title of CU President’s Teaching Scholar signifies the university system’s highest recognition of excellence in and commitment to learning and teaching, as well as active, substantial contributions to scholarly work. CU President Bruce D. Benson solicits annual nominations of faculty for the designation, which is a lifetime appointment.

CU-Boulder prof works to shrink error margins in U.S. census data

A person searching through the massive expanse of data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau in search of details about a specific neighborhood may increasingly find statistics with colossal margins of error, such as an average income of $50,000 plus or minus $50,000.

A geographer at the University of Colorado Boulder, one of eight nodes of the National Science Foundation’s newly created Census Research Network, has been granted a five-year $1.4 million grant to see if he can change that.

Climate zones will shift faster as climate warms, says University of Colorado Boulder-NOAA study

April 22, 2013

As the planet warms, Earth’s climate zones are shifting at an accelerating pace, says a new study led by a scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, a joint venture between the University of Colorado Boulder and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The bacterial bunch: Parents, kids and dogs trade microbes

As much as dog owners love their children, they tend to share more of themselves, at least in terms of bacteria, with their canine cohorts rather than their kids.

Small satellites becoming big deal for CU-Boulder students

For some University of Colorado Boulder undergraduates, designing, building and flying small satellites is becoming a large part of their hands-on education.

Scientists use brain scans to objectively measure pain

Doctors can measure your blood pressure, your weight, your cholesterol and your blood sugar. They can take X-rays of your bones, ultrasounds of your guts and electrocardiograms of your heart.

But even in 2013, the only way a doctor can measure your pain is to ask: How much does it hurt?

Thin, low Arctic clouds played important role in the massive 2012 Greenland ice melt

April 03, 2013

Clouds over the central Greenland Ice Sheet last July were “just right” for driving surface temperatures there above the melting point, according to a new study by scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the universities of Wisconsin, Idaho and Colorado. The study, published April 3, 2013 in Nature, found that thin, low-lying clouds allowed the sun’s energy to pass through and warm the surface of the ice, while at the same time trapping heat near the surface of the ice cap. This combination played a significant role in last summer's record-breaking melt.

CU-Boulder faculty honored for technology commercialization

April 01, 2013

The University of Colorado Technology Transfer Office is presenting awards April 1 to university researchers and companies representing best practices in the commercialization of university technologies.

 The TTO will present the Boulder campus awards to four researchers and one startup company during its annual Entrepreneurship Under the Microscope event, a celebration of campus entrepreneurship co-hosted with CU-Boulder’s Deming Center for Entrepreneurship.

Ancient asteroid may have triggered global firestorm on Earth

A new look at conditions after a Manhattan-sized asteroid slammed into a region of Mexico in the dinosaur days indicates the event could have triggered a global firestorm that would have burned every twig, bush and tree on Earth and led to the extinction of 80 percent of all Earth’s species, says a new University of Colorado Boulder study.

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