Discovery & Innovation

The bacterial bunch: Parents, kids and dogs trade microbes

As much as dog owners love their children, they tend to share more of themselves, at least in terms of bacteria, with their canine cohorts rather than their kids.

Small satellites becoming big deal for CU-Boulder students

For some University of Colorado Boulder undergraduates, designing, building and flying small satellites is becoming a large part of their hands-on education.

Scientists use brain scans to objectively measure pain

Doctors can measure your blood pressure, your weight, your cholesterol and your blood sugar. They can take X-rays of your bones, ultrasounds of your guts and electrocardiograms of your heart.

But even in 2013, the only way a doctor can measure your pain is to ask: How much does it hurt?

Thin, low Arctic clouds played important role in the massive 2012 Greenland ice melt

April 03, 2013

Clouds over the central Greenland Ice Sheet last July were “just right” for driving surface temperatures there above the melting point, according to a new study by scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the universities of Wisconsin, Idaho and Colorado. The study, published April 3, 2013 in Nature, found that thin, low-lying clouds allowed the sun’s energy to pass through and warm the surface of the ice, while at the same time trapping heat near the surface of the ice cap. This combination played a significant role in last summer's record-breaking melt.

CU-Boulder faculty honored for technology commercialization

April 01, 2013

The University of Colorado Technology Transfer Office is presenting awards April 1 to university researchers and companies representing best practices in the commercialization of university technologies.

 The TTO will present the Boulder campus awards to four researchers and one startup company during its annual Entrepreneurship Under the Microscope event, a celebration of campus entrepreneurship co-hosted with CU-Boulder’s Deming Center for Entrepreneurship.

Ancient asteroid may have triggered global firestorm on Earth

A new look at conditions after a Manhattan-sized asteroid slammed into a region of Mexico in the dinosaur days indicates the event could have triggered a global firestorm that would have burned every twig, bush and tree on Earth and led to the extinction of 80 percent of all Earth’s species, says a new University of Colorado Boulder study.

‘Sideline quasars’ helped to stifle early galaxy formation

University of Colorado Boulder astronomers targeting one of the brightest quasars glowing in the universe some 11 billion years ago say “sideline quasars” likely teamed up with it to heat abundant helium gas billions of years ago, preventing small galaxy formation.

Spring break in Costa Rica: Business students study coffee, tourism

As droves of CU-Boulder students leave campus to relax and play during spring break, a group of business students in the B3 Residential Academic Program (RAP) at the Leeds School of Business will be studying the sustainable coffee and tourism industries in Costa Rica.

While immersed in a tropical island location of pristine rain forests and verdant mountains, 26 freshmen will be doing fieldwork for course credit.

CU-Boulder student finds incubators have wildly varying magnetic fields

Lucas Portelli, a doctoral student in the University of Colorado Boulder’s Department of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, wanted to know how electromagnetic fields affect living things.

To find the answer, he went about building experiments. He tried to test the impact of the fields on E. coli, on cancer cells, on fruit flies and even on mice. But he quickly ran into a problem: The magnetic fields in the biological incubators he was using weren’t consistent. In fact, they weren’t even close.

Recent CU-Boulder graduate finds problem with biological incubators and patents solution

March 14, 2013

The strength of magnetic fields inside biological incubators can vary by orders of magnitude from one incubator to the next as well as from one location to another inside the same incubator, a finding with direct implications for some biologists, according to a new study by a recent University of Colorado Boulder graduate, who also patented a solution.

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