Discovery & Innovation

CU-Boulder physics prof Ivan Smalyukh receives Early Career Award from DOE

May 23, 2013

University of Colorado Boulder faculty member Ivan Smalyukh is among 61 scientists to receive a 2013 Early Career Award from the U.S. Department of Energy.

Smalyukh, an assistant professor of physics and a founding fellow of the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute, or RASEI, has been awarded $750,000 over five years. RASEI is a joint venture between CU-Boulder and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

CU-Boulder helps tap crowds to digitize museum records of bugs and plants

Inside the natural history museums of the world are billions of animal and plant specimens from birds, fish and beetles to flowers, mushrooms and grasses, all stacked, stored and preserved in jars and collection drawers.

The rich and diverse collections could be critical to understanding how the Earth’s biodiversity is changing in the face of a growing human footprint — if only the information were easily accessible.

Northern hemisphere losing last dry snow region, says CU study

Last July, something unprecedented in the 34-year satellite record happened: 98 percent of the Greenland Ice Sheet’s surface melted, compared to roughly 50 percent during an average summer. Snow that usually stays frozen and dry turned wet with melt water. Research led by the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences now shows last summer’s extreme melt could soon be the new normal.

Learn more about the Class of 2013: an in-depth series

The University of Colorado Boulder held its spring commencement ceremony on Friday, May 10, at Folsom Field. The ceremony honored candidates for 6,084 degrees, including 4,687 bachelor’s degrees, 903 master’s degrees, 171 law degrees and 494 doctoral degrees. Read more about the Class of 2013 >>

Insect eye-inspired camera captures wide field of view with no distortion, according to study co-led by CU-Boulder

May 01, 2013

By mimicking the bulging, bowl-shaped eyes possessed by dragonflies, praying mantises, houseflies and other insects, a team of researchers that includes a University of Colorado Boulder engineer has built an experimental digital camera that can take exceptionally wide-angle photos without distorting the image.

Insect eye-inspired camera captures wide view with no distortion

When praying mantises, dragonflies, ants and other insects peer out at the world, their bulging, compound eyes allow them to see an incredibly wide field of view with an almost infinite depth of field.

Imitating the functionality of an insect eye — which is really a collection of many tinier eyes, known as ommatidia — in a camera has been a long sought-after goal for engineers. Now, camera lenses with wide fields of view, such as fisheye lenses, create distortion around the edges of the image.

Dusinberre, Douglass named President's Teaching Scholars

Three University of Colorado professors have been chosen as 2013 President’s Teaching Scholars, educators who have skillfully integrated teaching and research at a high level throughout their careers at CU.

The title of CU President’s Teaching Scholar signifies the university system’s highest recognition of excellence in and commitment to learning and teaching, as well as active, substantial contributions to scholarly work. CU President Bruce D. Benson solicits annual nominations of faculty for the designation, which is a lifetime appointment.

CU-Boulder prof works to shrink error margins in U.S. census data

A person searching through the massive expanse of data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau in search of details about a specific neighborhood may increasingly find statistics with colossal margins of error, such as an average income of $50,000 plus or minus $50,000.

A geographer at the University of Colorado Boulder, one of eight nodes of the National Science Foundation’s newly created Census Research Network, has been granted a five-year $1.4 million grant to see if he can change that.

Climate zones will shift faster as climate warms, says University of Colorado Boulder-NOAA study

April 22, 2013

As the planet warms, Earth’s climate zones are shifting at an accelerating pace, says a new study led by a scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, a joint venture between the University of Colorado Boulder and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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