Discovery & Innovation

New mobile technology can test for agricultural pathogens in Africa

A University of Colorado Boulder faculty member will travel to Africa later this month to test a mobile smartphone technology developed by his team to rapidly detect and track natural carcinogens, including aflatoxin, which is estimated to contaminate up to 25 percent of the global food supply and cause severe illnesses in humans and animals.

Feather colors may be for more than just looks: Hue can affect bird health

For female North American barn swallows, looking good pays healthy dividends.

A new study conducted at the University of Colorado Boulder and involving Cornell University shows the outward appearance of female barn swallows, specifically the hue of their chestnut-colored breast feathers, has an influence on their physiological health.

Oldest North American petroglyphs dated to at least 10,500 years ago

A new high-tech analysis led by a University of Colorado Boulder researcher shows the oldest known petroglyphs in North America, which are cut into several boulders in western Nevada, date to at least 10,500 years ago and perhaps even as far back as 14,800 years ago.

CIRES and NOAA scientists observe significant methane leaks in a Utah natural gas field

August 05, 2013

CIRES news release

On a perfect winter day in Utah’s Uintah County in 2012, scientists from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and colleagues at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tested out a new way to measure methane emissions from a natural gas production field.

CU-led MAVEN mission spacecraft arrives at Florida launch site

August 05, 2013

The spacecraft for NASA’s Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, mission to Mars being led by the University of Colorado Boulder has arrived in Florida in anticipation of a November launch.

The spacecraft was shipped on Friday, Aug. 2, aboard a U.S. Air Force cargo plane from Buckley Air Force Base in Aurora, Colo., to the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, Fla. Lockheed Martin had previously assembled and tested MAVEN in its Littleton, Colo., facility.

The 'Holy Grail' of hydrogen production: CU-Boulder researchers find new way to split water

A University of Colorado Boulder team has developed a radically new technique that uses the power of sunlight to efficiently split water into its components of hydrogen and oxygen, paving the way for the broad use of hydrogen as a clean, green fuel.

Some Maasai appear to hunt lions as a form of political protest

Conventional wisdom holds that East Africa’s Maasai pastoralists hunt lions for two distinct reasons: to retaliate against lions that kill livestock or to engage in a cultural rite of passage. But that view reflects mistranslations of Maasai terms and a simplification of their cultural traditions and their relationship with wildlife, a team of researchers led by a University of Colorado Boulder geographer has concluded.

Chancellor's Corner: OPI takes CU toward a culture of continuous innovation

Here at CU-Boulder, we innovate all the time in our research, teaching and service. What if we applied that same philosophy to the basic ways we do business across the campus?

Last fall at my State of the Campus address, I challenged the campus to collectively and individually innovate – to find new ways to get our work done, and serve our constituents. I challenged our administrators to find ways to build on our efficiencies and to go further in bringing forth new ideas and methods to reach our goals.

Today, I’m delighted to announce that we’re taking an important step in achieving that goal, and embracing this philosophy of innovation through the formation of our Office of Performance Improvement (OPI). The office will be headed by Jeff Luftig, who currently serves as the Lockheed Martin Professor of Management and Director of the Engineering Management Program (EMP) in our College of Engineering and Applied Science.

CU-Boulder team develops new water splitting technique that could produce hydrogen fuel

August 01, 2013

A University of Colorado Boulder team has developed a radically new technique that uses the power of sunlight to efficiently split water into its components of hydrogen and oxygen, paving the way for the broad use of hydrogen as a clean, green fuel.

Set by the sun: An escape from electrical lights synchs our circadian clocks to the solar day

A weeklong wilderness escape from the electrical lights that illuminate most of our daily lives is enough to reset our internal circadian clocks to synchronize with sunrise and sunset, according to new research from the University of Colorado Boulder.

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