Discovery & Innovation

Pushing the boundaries of ultracold physics

Physicists at JILA on the CU-Boulder campus have for the first time observed chemical reactions near absolute zero, demonstrating that chemistry is possible at ultralow temperatures and that reaction rates can be controlled using quantum mechanics, the peculiar rules of submicroscopic physics.

Using indigenous knowledge to advance research

Using skills passed down through generations, Inuit forecasters living in the Canadian Arctic look to the sky to tell by the way the wind scatters a cloud whether a storm is on the horizon or if it’s safe to go on a hunt. Thousands of miles away in a lab in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, scientists take data measurements and use the latest computer models to predict weather. These are two practices serving the same purpose that come from disparate worlds.

Research collaboration explores biofuels and biorefining

A grant awarded to the Colorado Center for Biorefining and Biofuels, or C2B2, will allow students to conduct research related to the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. C2B2 is a joint renewable energy center of CU-Boulder, Colorado State University, Colorado School of Mines, the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and industry.

Exploring the neurological impact of anxiety on decision making

An increase in inhibitions could reduce anxiety in individuals suffering from anxiety and, as a result, help improve their decision making. A new CU-Boulder study shed light on the brain mechanisms that allow people to make choices and could be helpful in improving treatments for the millions suffering from the effects of anxiety disorders. In the study, psychology professor Yuko Munakata and her research colleagues found that “neural inhibition,” a process that occurs when one nerve cell suppresses activity in another, is a critical aspect in an individual’s ability to make choices.

CU-Boulder python study may have implications for human heart health

October 27, 2011

A surprising new University of Colorado Boulder study shows that huge amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding pythons promote healthy heart growth, results that may have implications for treating human heart disease.

Snake oil to treat heart disease? Idea may not be so far-fetched

Doctors prescribing snake oil for their patients?  The scenario may not be as far-fetched as it sounds.

A University of Colorado Boulder study has shown that huge amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding pythons promote healthy heart growth. The team found the amount of triglycerides -- the main constituent of natural fats and oils -- in the blood of Burmese pythons one day after eating increased by more than fifty-fold, said CU-Boulder Professor Leslie Leinwand, who led the study.

UCCS, CU-Boulder to lead electric vehicle development studies

October 17, 2011

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – University of Colorado Boulder faculty will join with University of Colorado Colorado Springs faculty to teach courses in the design and implementation of electric vehicle drivetrains to new and retraining engineers.

Magnetic attraction: NIST/CU microchip demonstrates concept of 'MRAM for Biomolecules'

October 17, 2011

Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and University of Colorado Boulder (CU) have developed a low-power microchip that uses a combination of microfluidics and magnetic switches to trap and transport magnetic beads. The novel transport chip may have applications in biotechnology and medical diagnostics.

CU-Boulder team discovers ancient road at Maya village buried by volcanic ash 1,400 years ago

October 05, 2011

A University of Colorado Boulder-led team excavating a Maya village in El Salvador buried by a volcanic eruption 1,400 years ago has unexpectedly hit an ancient white road that appears to lead to and from the town, which was frozen in time by a blanket of ash.

NSF awards $4.5 million to CU-Boulder-led team to study electrical processes in Earth's atmosphere

September 30, 2011

The National Science Foundation has awarded a five-year, $4.5 million grant to a team led by the University of Colorado Boulder to better understand the electrical processes that connect the Earth with the atmosphere and with space.

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