Discovery & Innovation

USAID, CU-Boulder partner to study water resources in Asia mountains

December 06, 2011

A University of Colorado Boulder team is partnering with the United States Agency for International Development to assess snow and glacier contributions to water resources originating in the high mountains of Asia that straddle 10 countries.

Early Earth may have been prone to deep freezes, says CU-Boulder study

December 05, 2011

Two University of Colorado Boulder researchers who have adapted a three-dimensional, general circulation model of Earth's climate to a time some 2.8 billion years ago when the sun was significantly fainter than present think the planet may have been more prone to catastrophic glaciation than previously believed.

CU students to demonstrate engineering and sustainability projects at three events

November 30, 2011

University of Colorado Boulder students will demonstrate innovative ideas and projects ranging from a safer climbing helmet to robot butlers at three expos over the next week. All of the events are free and open to the public.

CU-led study of smoking twins points to growing influence of genetic factors

November 16, 2011

A new study of twins led by the University of Colorado Boulder shows that today's smokers are more strongly influenced by genetic factors than in the past and that the influence makes it more difficult for them to quit.

Ancient bronze artifact from East Asia unearthed at Alaska archaeology site

November 14, 2011

A team of researchers led by the University of Colorado Boulder has discovered the first prehistoric bronze artifact made from a cast ever found in Alaska, a small, buckle-like object found in an ancient Eskimo dwelling and which likely originated in East Asia.

Anthropologist uncovers new insights into the ancient Maya

For the past six decades, archaeologists have documented dense populations of ancient Maya in Mexico and Central America—hundreds of people per square kilometer. Corn, beans and squash are well-known Mayan food staples, but they are sensitive to drought and require fertile soils, and thus would be insufficient to feed a large population. So what did the Maya eat?

CU engineers help launch Colorado K-12 science experiments into space

When the space shuttle Atlantis lifted off for its journey to the International Space Station in 2009, it had on board two butterfly habitats, which were part of an experiment conducted by CU-Boulder and K–12 students across the country.

CU-Boulder among the nation’s leaders in patent power

IEEE Spectrum’s annual U.S. patent scorecard analysis—2010 Patent Power—reviewed more than 1,000 world organizations to find out who owns the most influential patent portfolios. According to Spectrum, the analytic methodology “goes beyond patent counts to emphasize how frequently a company’s patents are cited by other patents.”

Researchers and inventors build on each other’s work to promote the progress of science. In the category of Universities/Education/Training, the University of Colorado ranked 14th, immediately behind Stanford and MIT.

Pushing the boundaries of ultracold physics

Physicists at JILA on the CU-Boulder campus have for the first time observed chemical reactions near absolute zero, demonstrating that chemistry is possible at ultralow temperatures and that reaction rates can be controlled using quantum mechanics, the peculiar rules of submicroscopic physics.

Using indigenous knowledge to advance research

Using skills passed down through generations, Inuit forecasters living in the Canadian Arctic look to the sky to tell by the way the wind scatters a cloud whether a storm is on the horizon or if it’s safe to go on a hunt. Thousands of miles away in a lab in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, scientists take data measurements and use the latest computer models to predict weather. These are two practices serving the same purpose that come from disparate worlds.

Pages

Give FeedbackSee More Photos View Photo