Discovery & Innovation

‘Sideline quasars’ helped to stifle early galaxy formation

University of Colorado Boulder astronomers targeting one of the brightest quasars glowing in the universe some 11 billion years ago say “sideline quasars” likely teamed up with it to heat abundant helium gas billions of years ago, preventing small galaxy formation.

Spring break in Costa Rica: Business students study coffee, tourism

As droves of CU-Boulder students leave campus to relax and play during spring break, a group of business students in the B3 Residential Academic Program (RAP) at the Leeds School of Business will be studying the sustainable coffee and tourism industries in Costa Rica.

While immersed in a tropical island location of pristine rain forests and verdant mountains, 26 freshmen will be doing fieldwork for course credit.

CU-Boulder student finds incubators have wildly varying magnetic fields

Lucas Portelli, a doctoral student in the University of Colorado Boulder’s Department of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, wanted to know how electromagnetic fields affect living things.

To find the answer, he went about building experiments. He tried to test the impact of the fields on E. coli, on cancer cells, on fruit flies and even on mice. But he quickly ran into a problem: The magnetic fields in the biological incubators he was using weren’t consistent. In fact, they weren’t even close.

Recent CU-Boulder graduate finds problem with biological incubators and patents solution

March 14, 2013

The strength of magnetic fields inside biological incubators can vary by orders of magnitude from one incubator to the next as well as from one location to another inside the same incubator, a finding with direct implications for some biologists, according to a new study by a recent University of Colorado Boulder graduate, who also patented a solution.

BioFrontiers scientist tackles a childhood disease of the heart

BioFrontiers Chief Scientific Officer Leslie Leinwand, has been studying the motor protein, myosin, for 25 years. This important protein is responsible for making muscles contract, including one vital muscle: your heart. Leinwand recently won a $45,837 grant from the Children’s Cardiomyopathy Foundation (CCF) to study the differences in the myosin mutations in adult and pediatric populations. She also plans to look at the effects of a small molecule drug on the pediatric versions of the protein in a test tube. This small molecule drug has promise for treating adults with heart failure.

When research meets music: BLOrk

Interdisciplinary discovery doesn’t always happen in the lab. Sometimes it integrates technology and musicians in an ensemble setting to provide live interaction, as in the case of the Boulder Laptop Orchestra (BLOrk). 

After computer science doctoral student Charles Dietrich and Associate Professor John Gunther of the College of Music met at a campus STEM poster presentation in the fall of 2012, the encounter led to new artistic collaboration through the College of Music’s BLOrk ensemble.

Erupting volcanoes offset recent Earth warming

A team led by the University of Colorado Boulder looking for clues about why Earth did not warm as much as scientists expected between 2000 and 2010 now thinks the culprits are hiding in plain sight -- dozens of volcanoes spewing sulfur dioxide.

Mystery radiation ring around the Earth catches scientists by surprise

With the flip of a switch, a pair of instruments designed and built by the University of Colorado Boulder and flying onboard twin NASA space probes have forced the revision of a 50-year-old theory about the structure of the radiation belts that wrap around the Earth just a few thousand miles above our heads.

CU’s nLab breeds real-world innovation among all walks of students

Interdisciplinary thinking bolsters innovation. That’s the concept behind the University of Colorado Boulder’s new nLab, a mobile hub that allows students to develop their entrepreneurial ideas through peer and mentor-based collaboration, sustainability resources and other tools.

Warming climate likely cause of pinyon pine cone decline

Creeping climate change in the Southwest appears to be having a negative effect on pinyon pine reproduction, a finding with implications for wildlife species sharing the same woodland ecosystems, says a University of Colorado Boulder-led study.

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