Discovery & Innovation

BioFrontiers scientist tackles a childhood disease of the heart

BioFrontiers Chief Scientific Officer Leslie Leinwand, has been studying the motor protein, myosin, for 25 years. This important protein is responsible for making muscles contract, including one vital muscle: your heart. Leinwand recently won a $45,837 grant from the Children’s Cardiomyopathy Foundation (CCF) to study the differences in the myosin mutations in adult and pediatric populations. She also plans to look at the effects of a small molecule drug on the pediatric versions of the protein in a test tube. This small molecule drug has promise for treating adults with heart failure.

When research meets music: BLOrk

Interdisciplinary discovery doesn’t always happen in the lab. Sometimes it integrates technology and musicians in an ensemble setting to provide live interaction, as in the case of the Boulder Laptop Orchestra (BLOrk). 

After computer science doctoral student Charles Dietrich and Associate Professor John Gunther of the College of Music met at a campus STEM poster presentation in the fall of 2012, the encounter led to new artistic collaboration through the College of Music’s BLOrk ensemble.

Erupting volcanoes offset recent Earth warming

A team led by the University of Colorado Boulder looking for clues about why Earth did not warm as much as scientists expected between 2000 and 2010 now thinks the culprits are hiding in plain sight -- dozens of volcanoes spewing sulfur dioxide.

Mystery radiation ring around the Earth catches scientists by surprise

With the flip of a switch, a pair of instruments designed and built by the University of Colorado Boulder and flying onboard twin NASA space probes have forced the revision of a 50-year-old theory about the structure of the radiation belts that wrap around the Earth just a few thousand miles above our heads.

CU’s nLab breeds real-world innovation among all walks of students

Interdisciplinary thinking bolsters innovation. That’s the concept behind the University of Colorado Boulder’s new nLab, a mobile hub that allows students to develop their entrepreneurial ideas through peer and mentor-based collaboration, sustainability resources and other tools.

Warming climate likely cause of pinyon pine cone decline

Creeping climate change in the Southwest appears to be having a negative effect on pinyon pine reproduction, a finding with implications for wildlife species sharing the same woodland ecosystems, says a University of Colorado Boulder-led study.

NASA’s MAVEN mission completes assembly, begins environmental testing

February 08, 2013

NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is assembled and is undergoing environmental testing at Lockheed Martin Space Systems facilities, near Denver, Colo. MAVEN is the next mission to Mars and will be the first mission devoted to understanding the Martian upper atmosphere.

Chancellor's Corner: The proof is in the patents

I speak frequently about how CU-Boulder discovery and innovation leads to economic development, company creation and advancements for society. Here’s a bit of proof.  A new study from the Brookings Institution released a week ago finds Boulder among the top five patent-producing metropolitan areas in the nation.

Frog lessons: More biodiversity equals less disease

Researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder have been on a frog hunt.

They’ve spent three years scouring hundreds of California ponds in search of amphibians with mangled, grotesque deformities. Sometimes, the frogs have misshapen legs. Sometimes, they have extra sets of legs sprouting where they don’t belong. And sometimes, they have no legs at all.

By cataloging the deformed frogs — and the toads, newts and salamanders that share their homes — the researchers have made an important discovery: more diversity equals fewer deformations.

CIRES-led study discovers high levels of air-cleansing compound over ocean

January 24, 2013

Researchers have detected the presence of a pollutant-destroying compound iodine monoxide in surprisingly high levels high above the tropical ocean, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences.

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