Discovery & Innovation

Jin awarded Isaac Newton Medal of the Institute of Physics

Deborah Jin has won the 2014 Isaac Newton Medal, the highest accolade given by the Institute of Physics. She was cited for her experimental work in laser cooling atoms. This work has led to the practical demonstration of universal laws that upderpin fundamental quantum behavior. 

Tapir-Hedgehog

CU-Boulder-led team identifies fossils of tiny, unknown hedgehog

July 08, 2014

Meet perhaps the tiniest hedgehog species ever: Silvacola acares. Its roughly 52-million-year-old fossil remains were recently identified by a University of Colorado Boulder-led team working in British Columbia.

The hedgehog’s scientific name means “tiny forest dweller,” said CU-Boulder Associate Professor Jaelyn Eberle of the geological sciences department, lead author on the study. The creature -- a new genus and species to science -- was only about 2 inches long, roughly the length of an adult thumb.

Unlocked documents reveal true story of what happened to big-band great Glenn Miller

D.B. Cooper. Amelia Earhart. Jimmy Hoffa. All prominent Americans whose unexplained disappearances have fascinated and confounded armchair historians and professionals alike—and created fertile ground for all manner of wild explanations and conspiracy theories.

Ditto for Glenn Miller, one of the University of Colorado Boulder’s most illustrious alumni, who was the nation’s most famous big-band leader when he disappeared Dec. 15, 1944, after heading out over the English Channel on a small military plane bound for Paris.

Oklahoma earthquake swarm linked to wastewater injection wells, says study involving CU-Boulder

July 03, 2014

The massive increase in earthquakes in central Oklahoma is likely being caused by the injection of vast amounts of wastewater from oil and gas operations into underground layers of rock, according to a new study led by Cornell University and involving the University of Colorado Boulder.

New study involving CU-Boulder tells the tale of a kangaroo’s tail

July 02, 2014

Kangaroos may be nature’s best hoppers. But when they are grazing on all fours, which is most of the time, their tail becomes a powerful fifth leg, says a new study.

Kids whose time is less structured are better able to meet their own goals, says CU-Boulder study

June 18, 2014

Children who spend more time in less structured activities—from playing outside to reading books to visiting the zoo—are better able to set their own goals and take actions to meet those goals without prodding from adults, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder.

Virtual desktops: Reality at CU-Boulder

Staff in the University of Colorado Boulder’s Housing & Dining Services are not fooled by the name “virtual.” They fully understand that virtual desktops provide a very real and familiar computing experience. This hot emerging technology is gaining workplace traction and CU-Boulder’s Housing & Dining Services is demonstrating that it can present big advantages for the university. 

Solar image courtesy of NASA

Astronomers discover first Thorne-Żytkow object, a bizarre type of hybrid star

June 04, 2014

In a discovery decades in the making, scientists have detected the first of a “theoretical” class of stars first proposed in 1975 by physicist Kip Thorne and astronomer Anna Żytkow.

CU-Boulder payload selected for launch on Virgin Galactic spaceship

June 03, 2014

A University of Colorado Boulder payload carrying a novel device designed to reduce the weight and cost of spacecraft fuel pumping systems has been manifested for launch on a suborbital space plane called SpaceShipTwo developed by the aerospace company Virgin Galactic.

Technology developed at CU-Boulder could allow for more powerful atomic collisions

In 2012, people across the globe were dazzled to learn that the Large Hadron Collider—a 17-mile ring buried underground on the border of Switzerland and France—had for the first time provided evidence of the elusive Higgs Boson.

The discovery was made after scientists accelerated two beams of protons in the underground tube to nearly the speed of light and then crashed them into each other. The violent collision produced an array of exotic subatomic particles, including the Higgs Boson, that live only briefly before decaying away.

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