Discovery & Innovation

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden to visit CU-Boulder April 18

April 14, 2014

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden will give a free public talk at the University of Colorado Boulder April 18 on America’s space program and the challenges and opportunities the space agency will encounter as it moves through the 21st century.

The talk, titled “NASA’s Roadmap to Tomorrow’s Missions,” will be held at CU-Boulder’s East Stadium Club on the east side of Folsom Field from 2:45 to 3:30 p.m. The presentation will be followed by a question-and-answer session with the audience.

Reading in 3­D: Making books for visually impaired children

On most nights, Tom Yeh puts his 3­-year-­old son on his lap, opens a children's book and reads aloud. It's a much­-loved activity for both father and son as the characters are brought to life.

A year ago, while reading the children's classic Goodnight Moon, Yeh, an assistant professor in computer science, began thinking about how to make books more accessible to visually impaired preschool-­age children.

Student's passion for classics leads to treasure hunt with ancient clay tablets

When Christina Chandler transferred to the University of Colorado Boulder as an English major, her advisor pushed her to take a course in classics. It would meet a requirement, the advisor said, and it fit into her schedule.

Chandler, who didn’t think she’d be interested in the subject, was not happy. But she gave in.

Critical reviews of student artwork spark ideas

On a recent snow-free afternoon, a group of graduate students and their professor in the Department of Art and Art History gathered around two people standing in the courtyard of the Visual Arts Complex on campus. Long colorful strings stretched from one student to the other. The strings billowed and moved in the breeze as the students and professor pondered, discussed and questioned the thought process behind the artwork of Alia Pialtos, a graduate student in the ceramics program.

Chancellor DiStefano appointed to Colorado Innovation Network (COIN) advisory board

Chancellor Philip DiStefano was appointed last week to the advisory board of the Colorado Innovation Network (COIN),  that was launched by Gov. John Hickenlooper in 2011 to encourage public-private collaboration in industries expected to create new jobs.

Student-professor collaboration could result in a better-fed astronaut

As an undergrad studying ecology and evolutionary biology, Lizzie Lombardi found herself as one of the few “plant” people on a team of University of Colorado Boulder engineering students who were tasked with a lofty mission: build a robotic system that could garden in space.

JILA physicists discover ‘quantum droplet’ in semiconductor

February 26, 2014

NIST news release

JILA physicists used an ultrafast laser and help from German theorists to discover a new semiconductor quasiparticle—a handful of smaller particles that briefly condense into a liquid-like droplet.

JILA is a joint institute of CU-Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

President Barack Obama delivers remarks announcing two new public-private Manufacturing Innovation Institutes, and launches the first of four new Manufacturing Innovation Institute Competitions, in the East Room of the White House, Feb. 25, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Obama announces CU-Boulder will be a partner in digital manufacturing institute

February 25, 2014

The University of Colorado Boulder and the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade will be part of the new Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute announced today by President Barack Obama.

Nanoscale pillars could radically improve conversion of heat to electricity, say CU-Boulder researchers

February 20, 2014

University of Colorado Boulder scientists have found a creative way to radically improve thermoelectric materials, a finding that could one day lead to the development of improved solar panels, more energy-efficient cooling equipment, and even the creation of new devices that could turn the vast amounts of heat wasted at power plants into more electricity.

Equations connect ancient settlements to modern cities, says CU-Boulder anthropologist

Visitors to the ancient city of Teotihuacan—with its pyramidal structures arranged in careful geometric patterns, its temples, and its massive central thoroughfare, dubbed Street of the Dead—in Mexico may have the sensation they’re gazing at the remains of a society profoundly different from their own.
 
But new research from anthropologists armed with a bevy of recently derived mathematical equations shows that in some fundamental ways, today’s cities and yesterday’s settlements may be more alike than different.

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