Discovery & Innovation

Emiliania huxleyi

Shell-shocked: Ocean acidification likely hampers tiny shell builders in Southern Ocean

March 25, 2015

A University of Colorado Boulder study shows a ubiquitous type of phytoplankton -- tiny organisms that are the base of the marine food web – appears to be suffering from the effects of ocean acidification caused by climate change.

Study: Western forests decimated by pine beetles not more likely to burn

March 23, 2015

Western U.S. forests killed by the mountain pine beetle epidemic are no more at risk to burn than healthy Western forests, according to new findings by the University of Colorado Boulder that fly in the face of both public perception and policy.

Research on small cellular changes may lead to big cancer solutions

Among cancers, scientists have spent their entire research careers looking for cellular similarities that may lead to a single cure for many cancers –– the rare chance to have a single answer to a multifaceted problem. In 1997, scientists discovered a gene that they believed was the key to cellular immortality. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, or TERT, is a catalytic piece of telomerase, and while cellular immortality sounds like a good idea, it is actually how cancerous tumors grow and proliferate in cancer patients. In a recent paper published in Science, Tom Cech, director of the BioFrontiers Institute, worked with collaborators at CU's Anschutz Medical Campus to study mutations in bladder cancer that may lead to better treatments for many types of cancers.

CU-Boulder-created app first to use gesture for language learning

While you might think a person shaking her phone or tablet from side to side is having issues with the device, she might actually be playing a game that has her mimicking a steering wheel motion as part of a language lesson.

The game Nano Nano for mobile devices, created by two University of Colorado Boulder graduate students, is the first app to incorporate gesturing with language learning.

Faculty in Focus No. 6: The composer

Colorado’s harsh winter of 1873-74 gave rise to an event that has captivated Coloradans ever since: Alferd Packer, a prospector stranded in the snow in the Rocky Mountains with his friends, forced to resort to cannibalism to survive.

The rich history of the ordeal and resulting trial, societal reactions, and the mystery surrounding it have inspired numerous books and creative presentations. In recent years, CU-Boulder students voted to name the UMC cafeteria the Alferd Packer Restaurant & Grill, with its slogan, “Have a Friend for Lunch.”

Chancellor’s Corner: Undertaking a grand challenge

In my State of the Campus address, I invited all faculty, staff and students to undertake a grand challenge in which we leverage our unique strengths in Earth and space science and technology. 

My vision for the grand challenge is to create a collaborative environment among Earth and space sciences, engineering, business, law, social sciences and humanities faculty members, students and staff as well as public and private sector partners in order to explore, understand and influence how space-based innovations and technologies impact business, law and society. I have named a steering committee to help make this vision a reality, and plan for a Dec. 9 "Imagination Summit."

University Libraries launches open access repository, CU Scholar

University of Colorado Boulder Libraries is celebrating the launch of the open access repository CU Scholar, housed online at scholar.colorado.edu. This new institutional repository will aggregate and disseminate the wealth of scholarly knowledge created under the auspices of the University of Colorado Boulder and its research units. CU Scholar welcomes materials of scholarly focus, including published journal articles, working papers, technical reports, multimedia content and datasets.

Do the loco-motion: How animals and people get here from there

Rodger Kram, a faculty member in the integrative physiology department and an expert on human locomotion, has a fond place in his heart for kangaroos. A few decades ago he and colleagues measured the gait and metabolism of hopping kangaroos, and more recently took a look at their other mode of movement -- grazing on all fours for food.

Stunning variety of microbes in Central Park soils mirrors global microbial diversity

October 01, 2014

Soil microbes that thrive in the deserts, rainforests, prairies and forests of the world can also be found living beneath New York City’s Central Park, according to a surprising new study led by Colorado State University and the University of Colorado Boulder.

The research team analyzed 596 soil samples collected from across Central Park’s 843 acres and discovered a stunning diversity of below-ground life, most of which had never been documented before.

CU-Boulder's seventh New Venture Challenge kicks off Sept. 29

The New Venture Challenge (NVC), a CU-Boulder campus-wide entrepreneurship competition, is entering its seventh year, and all campus community members are invited to attend the NVC Kick Off on Monday, Sept. 29. 

NVC acts as entrepreneurial "flight simulator," giving members of the CU community with an interest in starting a business a chance to give it a try while learning about the process through events, workshops and mentors. This year’s event will feature Julian Farrior of Backflip Studios, and serves as an introduction to the program. 

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