Discovery & Innovation

Stunning variety of microbes in Central Park soils mirrors global microbial diversity

October 01, 2014

Soil microbes that thrive in the deserts, rainforests, prairies and forests of the world can also be found living beneath New York City’s Central Park, according to a surprising new study led by Colorado State University and the University of Colorado Boulder.

The research team analyzed 596 soil samples collected from across Central Park’s 843 acres and discovered a stunning diversity of below-ground life, most of which had never been documented before.

CU-Boulder's seventh New Venture Challenge kicks off Sept. 29

The New Venture Challenge (NVC), a CU-Boulder campus-wide entrepreneurship competition, is entering its seventh year, and all campus community members are invited to attend the NVC Kick Off on Monday, Sept. 29. 

NVC acts as entrepreneurial "flight simulator," giving members of the CU community with an interest in starting a business a chance to give it a try while learning about the process through events, workshops and mentors. This year’s event will feature Julian Farrior of Backflip Studios, and serves as an introduction to the program. 

MAVEN at Mars

CU-Boulder-led Mars mission set for orbit insertion Sept. 21

September 17, 2014

A NASA mission to Mars led by the University of Colorado Boulder is set to slide into orbit around the red planet Sept. 21 to investigate how its climate has changed over the eons, completing a 10-month interplanetary journey of 442 million miles.

The orbit-insertion maneuver will begin with six thruster engines firing to shed some of the velocity from the spacecraft, known as the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN mission. The thruster engines will ignite and burn for 33 minutes to slow the spacecraft, allowing it to be captured into an elliptical orbit around Mars.

Researchers rescue old satellite data and uncover sea ice secrets

Experts at the National Snow and Ice Data Center are recovering long-lost images from the Nimbus satellites, the first of which was launched 50 years ago. The pictures are allowing researchers to extend the satellite record of sea ice back to the 1960s.

New climate documentary featuring Boulder scientists to air Aug. 28

A new documentary about measuring past climate change as a way to better understand human-caused warming of the planet, which features several Boulder scientists, will be broadcast on Colorado Public Television on Thursday, Aug. 28.

Aerospace Industry Insights event highlights CU's aerospace innovation and research

Members of the Boulder Chamber, a nonprofit business support and advocacy organization, visited CU-Boulder July 29 to learn about the university’s latest advances in space science and aerospace.

The Aerospace Industry Insights event, held at Fiske Planetarium, brought together local, state and federal officials; CU-Boulder faculty, students and administrators; and leaders from the local business community. The purpose of the event, the first in a series sponsored by CU-Boulder and the Boulder Chamber, was to highlight for the business community CU-Boulder's research and innovation in order to foster continued partnership and economic growth.

No evidence that California cellphone ban decreased accidents, says CU-Boulder researcher

July 17, 2014

In a recent study, a researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder found no evidence that a California ban on using hand-held cellphones while driving decreased the number of traffic accidents in the state in the first six months following the ban.

CU-Boulder instrument onboard Hubble reveals the universe is ‘missing’ light

July 09, 2014

Something is amiss in the universe. There appears to be an enormous deficit of ultraviolet light in the cosmic budget.

Observations made by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, a $70 million instrument designed by the University of Colorado Boulder and installed on the Hubble Space Telescope, have revealed that the universe is “missing” a large amount of light.

Jin awarded Isaac Newton Medal of the Institute of Physics

Deborah Jin has won the 2014 Isaac Newton Medal, the highest accolade given by the Institute of Physics. She was cited for her experimental work in laser cooling atoms. This work has led to the practical demonstration of universal laws that upderpin fundamental quantum behavior. 

Tapir-Hedgehog

CU-Boulder-led team identifies fossils of tiny, unknown hedgehog

July 08, 2014

Meet perhaps the tiniest hedgehog species ever: Silvacola acares. Its roughly 52-million-year-old fossil remains were recently identified by a University of Colorado Boulder-led team working in British Columbia.

The hedgehog’s scientific name means “tiny forest dweller,” said CU-Boulder Associate Professor Jaelyn Eberle of the geological sciences department, lead author on the study. The creature -- a new genus and species to science -- was only about 2 inches long, roughly the length of an adult thumb.

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