Discoveries & Achievements

Celebrity endorsements not always a good bet, CU-Boulder study shows

June 20, 2012

 

Companies paying celebrities big money to endorse their products may not realize that negative perceptions about a celebrity are more likely to transfer to an endorsed brand than are positive ones, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study.

Celebrity endorsements are widely used to increase brand visibility and connect brands with celebrities’ personality traits, but do not always work in the positive manner marketers envision, according to Margaret C. Campbell of CU-Boulder’s Leeds School of Business, who led the study.

Mars - a beaten and battered planet

It’s no secret that Mars is a beaten and battered planet -- astronomers have been peering for centuries at the violent impact craters created by cosmic buckshot pounding its surface over billions of years. But just how beat up is it?

Really beat up, according to a CU-Boulder research team that recently finished counting, outlining and cataloging a staggering 635,000 impact craters on Mars that are roughly a kilometer or more in diameter.

Normal bacterial makeup of the body has huge implications for health, says CU-Boulder professor

June 13, 2012

 

For the first time, a consortium of researchers organized by the National Institutes of Health, including a University of Colorado Boulder professor, has mapped the normal microbial makeup of healthy humans.

CU-Boulder researchers catalog more than 635,000 Martian craters

June 11, 2012

It’s no secret that Mars is a beaten and battered planet -- astronomers have been peering for centuries at the violent impact craters created by cosmic buckshot pounding its surface over billions of years. But just how beat up is it?

CU-Boulder-led team finds microbes in extreme environment on South American volcanoes

June 08, 2012

 

A team led by the University of Colorado Boulder looking for organisms that eke out a living in some of the most inhospitable soils on Earth has found a hardy few.

A new DNA analysis of rocky soils in the Martian-like landscape on some volcanoes in South America has revealed a handful of bacteria, fungi and other rudimentary organisms called archaea, which seem to have a different way of converting energy than their cousins elsewhere in the world.

CU-Boulder physicists use ultrafast lasers to create first tabletop X-ray device

June 07, 2012

 

An international research team led by the University of Colorado Boulder has generated the first laser-like beams of X-rays from a tabletop device, paving the way for major advances in many fields including medicine, biology and nanotechnology development.

CU professor involved in $8.3 million Gates Foundation childhood malnutrition study

May 14, 2012

 

An $8.3 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will fund an international team of scientists, including a University of Colorado Boulder professor focused on finding new ways to diagnose, treat and prevent a critical global health problem: malnutrition in infants and children.

CU-Boulder professor receives $750,000 Department of Energy early career award

May 10, 2012

Assistant Professor Paul Romatschke of the University of Colorado Boulder physics department will receive a five-year, $750,000 grant as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Early Career Research Program created to bolster the nation’s scientific workforce with top young researchers.

Romatschke was among 68 winners selected nationwide from a pool of 850 applicants from universities and national laboratories

New ‘Map of Life’ project aims to show distribution of all plants, animals on planet

May 10, 2012

A research team involving Yale University and the University of Colorado Boulder has developed a first public demonstration version of its “Map of Life,” an ambitious Web-based endeavor designed to show the distribution of all living plants and animals on the planet.

Overfed black holes shut down galactic star-making, says new study involving CU-Boulder

May 09, 2012

 

Galaxies with the most powerful, active black holes at their cores produce fewer stars than galaxies with less active black holes, according to a new study involving the University of Colorado Boulder using the Herschel Space Observatory.

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