Discoveries & Achievements

Nitrogen pollution changing Rocky Mountain National Park vegetation, says CU-Boulder study

July 05, 2012

A new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder indicates air pollution in the form of nitrogen compounds emanating from power plants, automobiles and agriculture is changing the alpine vegetation in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Renowned CU-Boulder/NIST institute celebrates 50 years of scientific advances; named an ‘historic physics site’

July 03, 2012

 

Several hundred people are expected to gather on the University of Colorado Boulder campus July 12-13 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of JILA, a joint institute of CU-Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) known around the world for its discoveries in atomic, molecular and optical physics. In addition, the president-elect of the American Physical Society will be on hand to officially announce JILA’s designation as an historic physics site.

Ancient human ancestor had unique diet, according to study involving CU

June 27, 2012

 

When it came to eating, an upright, 2 million-year-old African hominid had a diet unlike virtually all other known human ancestors, says a study led by the Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany and involving the University of Colorado Boulder.

Celebrity endorsements not always a good bet, CU-Boulder study shows

June 20, 2012

 

Companies paying celebrities big money to endorse their products may not realize that negative perceptions about a celebrity are more likely to transfer to an endorsed brand than are positive ones, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study.

Celebrity endorsements are widely used to increase brand visibility and connect brands with celebrities’ personality traits, but do not always work in the positive manner marketers envision, according to Margaret C. Campbell of CU-Boulder’s Leeds School of Business, who led the study.

Mars - a beaten and battered planet

It’s no secret that Mars is a beaten and battered planet -- astronomers have been peering for centuries at the violent impact craters created by cosmic buckshot pounding its surface over billions of years. But just how beat up is it?

Really beat up, according to a CU-Boulder research team that recently finished counting, outlining and cataloging a staggering 635,000 impact craters on Mars that are roughly a kilometer or more in diameter.

Normal bacterial makeup of the body has huge implications for health, says CU-Boulder professor

June 13, 2012

 

For the first time, a consortium of researchers organized by the National Institutes of Health, including a University of Colorado Boulder professor, has mapped the normal microbial makeup of healthy humans.

CU-Boulder researchers catalog more than 635,000 Martian craters

June 11, 2012

It’s no secret that Mars is a beaten and battered planet -- astronomers have been peering for centuries at the violent impact craters created by cosmic buckshot pounding its surface over billions of years. But just how beat up is it?

CU-Boulder-led team finds microbes in extreme environment on South American volcanoes

June 08, 2012

 

A team led by the University of Colorado Boulder looking for organisms that eke out a living in some of the most inhospitable soils on Earth has found a hardy few.

A new DNA analysis of rocky soils in the Martian-like landscape on some volcanoes in South America has revealed a handful of bacteria, fungi and other rudimentary organisms called archaea, which seem to have a different way of converting energy than their cousins elsewhere in the world.

CU-Boulder physicists use ultrafast lasers to create first tabletop X-ray device

June 07, 2012

 

An international research team led by the University of Colorado Boulder has generated the first laser-like beams of X-rays from a tabletop device, paving the way for major advances in many fields including medicine, biology and nanotechnology development.

CU professor involved in $8.3 million Gates Foundation childhood malnutrition study

May 14, 2012

 

An $8.3 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will fund an international team of scientists, including a University of Colorado Boulder professor focused on finding new ways to diagnose, treat and prevent a critical global health problem: malnutrition in infants and children.

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