CU Museum of Natural History

Animal Behavior Society meeting at CU-Boulder to feature public talks, activities, film festival

July 24, 2013

The 50th annual meeting of the international Animal Behavior Society to be held at the University of Colorado Boulder July 28-Aug. 2 will feature several public events, including lectures, scientific demonstrations and a film festival.

The public lectures, to be held at the Glenn Miller Ballroom in the University Memorial Center, are part of the Applied Animal Behavior Public Day on Sunday, July 28, titled “Creating Quality Lives for Dogs and Cats Through the Science of Animal Behavior.”  

Later Stone Age got earlier start in South Africa than thought, says CU researcher

July 30, 2012

The Later Stone Age emerged in South Africa more than 20,000 years earlier than previously believed -- about the same time humans were migrating from Africa to the European continent, says a new international study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

New ‘Map of Life’ project aims to show distribution of all plants, animals on planet

May 10, 2012

A research team involving Yale University and the University of Colorado Boulder has developed a first public demonstration version of its “Map of Life,” an ambitious Web-based endeavor designed to show the distribution of all living plants and animals on the planet.

Warm winters mean more pine beetles, tree damage

Some populations of mountain pine beetles now produce two generations of tree-killing offspring annually, dramatically increasing the potential for bugs to kill lodgepole and ponderosa pine trees, CU-Boulder researchers have found.

Because of the extra annual generation of beetles, there could be up to 60 times as many beetles attacking trees in any given year, the study found. And in response to warmer temperatures at high elevations, pine beetles also are better able to survive and attack trees that haven't previously developed defenses.

Listen up: crickets have had ears on their legs for more than 50 million years

How did insects get their hearing? A new study of 50-million-year-old cricket and katydid fossils sporting some of the best preserved fossil insect ears described to date are helping to trace the evolution of the insect ear.

According to University of Colorado Museum of Natural History paleontologist Dena Smith and University of Illinois Professor Roy Plotnick, who collaborated on the new study at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, or NESCent, in Durham, N.C., insects hear with help from some very unusual ears.

50-million-year-old cricket and katydid fossils from Colorado hint at origin of insect hearing

January 03, 2012

How did insects get their hearing? A new study of 50-million-year-old cricket and katydid fossils sporting some of the best preserved fossil insect ears described to date are helping to trace the evolution of the insect ear.

According to paleontologist Dena Smith of the University of Colorado Boulder's Museum of Natural History and University of Illinois Professor Roy Plotnick, who collaborated on the new study at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, or NESCent, in Durham, N.C., insects hear with help from some very unusual ears.

Arctic Climate May be More Sensitive to Warming Than Thought, Says New Study

June 29, 2010

A new study shows the Arctic climate system may be more sensitive to greenhouse warming than previously thought, and that current levels of Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide may be high enough to bring about significant, irreversible shifts in Arctic ecosystems.

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