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College of Arts and Sciences

Communication

Organizational Communication
COMM 2600, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 17692
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Matthew Koschmann

Provides a communicatively-based definition of formal organization and deals with individual-organizational relationships. Addresses topics such as organizational theory, organizational culture, power, technology, decision making, teamwork, leadership, diversity, gender, socialization, and ethics. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Recommended prereqs., COMM 1210 and 1600. Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Gender and Communication
COMM 3420, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 18176
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Lisa Flores

Examines gender as a social practice that remains vital to identities, relationships, and institutions in contemporary society. Treats gender as something we do or enact through communication, rather than as something we are or have, and explores the implications of this shift in perspective. Investigates how gender interacts with sexuality, race, class, nation, age, ability, and other aspects of identity. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course.

Economics

Introduction to Statistics with Computer Applications
ECON 3818, 4 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 18562
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Donald Waldman

Introduces statistical methods and their applications in quantitative economic analysis. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Prereqs., ECON 2010 and 2020; and either ECON 1078 and 1088, or MATH 1300, or MATH 1310, or MATH 1081, or MATH 1080, 1090, and 1100, or APPM 1350, or equivalent.

English

American Frontiers
◆ENGL 2115, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 17683
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Penelope Kelsey

Considers the backdrop of the American West in literature, film, photography, and gaming. We will focus on a range of narratives and images depicting this wide swathe of American geography while simultaneously cultivating close reading skills, digital media analysis, and film analysis that will aid you in deeper insights at the textual level. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: U.S. context.

Shakespeare for Nonmajors
◆ENGL 3000, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 13468
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Katherine Eggert

Introduces students to Shakespeare's major works: the histories, comedies, and tragedies. May include the nondramatic poetry as well. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Prereq., sophomore standing. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

Modern and Contemporary Literature for Nonmajors
◆ENGL 3060, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 13471
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Laura Winkiel

Close study of significant 20th century poetry, drama, and prose works. Readings range from 1920s to the present. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Prereq., sophomore standing. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

Topics in Popular Culture: The Werewolf
ENGL 3246, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 15018
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Stephen Jones

Werewolves have been with us nearly as long as we've been walking on two legs, and running away from things. In here we'll look at where they're from, at why we've kept them around, and we'll dissect the different types as they appear in folklore, literature, film, and beyond. Are they cautionary tale or a fantasy creature? Do we use them to see ourselves better, or are they reminders of our tenuous place in the world? All this and more, and in four weeks. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours for different topics. Prereq., sophomore standing.

French

Beginning French 1
◆FREN 1010, 5 semester hours, Section 400, Class No. 17307
Session D: June 2–August 8, 2014
Faculty to be announced

For students with no previous knowledge of French. Presents basic grammar and most commonly used French vocabulary. Introduces students to Francophone culture. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Credit not granted for this course and FREN 1050. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: foreign language.

Beginning French 2
◆FREN 1020, 5 semester hours, Section 400, Class No. 18249
Session D: June 2–August 8, 2014
Faculty to be announced

Continuation of FREN 1010. Completes the presentation of most basic structures and French vocabulary. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Prereq., successful completion of one semester of college-level French or two years of high school French. Credit not granted for this course and FREN 1050. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: foreign language.

German

The Enlightenment: Tolerance and Emancipation
◆GRMN 3505, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 13437
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Ann Schmiesing

Examines the enlightenment belief in reason and the common humanity of all individuals and cultures. Emphasizes arguments for and against freedom of religion, abolition of slavery, and emancipation of women in 18th century European and American literature and thought. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Same as HUMN 3505. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

German Film and Society after 1989
GRMN 3514, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 18528
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Beverly Weber

Introduces post-1989 German culture through film. The course emphasizes films in their socio-historical content and explores developments in German culture during and after the unification. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Taught in English.

History

Western Civilization 2: 16th Century to the Present
◆HIST 1020, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 13500
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Susan Kent

Surveys political, economic, social, and intellectual developments in European history from the 16th century to the present. Similarities and contrasts between European states are underscored, as is Europe's changing role in world history. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Credit not granted for this course and HIST 1040. Meets MAPS requirement for social science: general and world history. Approved for GT-HI1. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

Introduction to Japanese History
◆HIST 1708, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 17469
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Marcia Yonemoto

A broad interdisciplinary survey of the history of Japan from earliest times to the 20th century. Explores the development of political institutions, social structures, cultural and religious life, economic development, and foreign relations in an historical perspective. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Approved for GT-HI1. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

History of Christianity 1: To the Reformation
◆HIST 2170, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 17708
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Scott Bruce

General introduction to the history of Christianity from its beginnings through the first period of the Protestant Reformation. Examines religious life and the church in relation to its social and cultural setting. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Approved for GT-HI1. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

America through Baseball
◆HIST 2516, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 13503
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Thomas Zeiler

Baseball could not have existed without America. This course explains how the game fits into the larger context of social, cultural, economic, and political history from the 19th century to the present. Students will study the events and people who made baseball the national pastime. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Similar to HIST 4556. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context. Restricted to non-history majors.

Contemporary China
HIST 4638, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 13504
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Timothy Weston

Examines the history of the People's Republic of China from 1949 to the present. Focuses on such issues as the nature of Maoism, foreign policy, political campaigns such as the Cultural Revolution and the Democracy Movement, and recent economic developmental efforts. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. HIST 4638 and HIST 5638 are the same course.

Integrative Physiology

Scientific Writing in Integrative Physiology
◆IPHY 3700, 3 semester hours, Section 301, Class No. 18534
Session C: June 2–July 25, 2014
Marie Boyko

Takes a process-based approach to writing. Assignments and classroom experiences emphasize critical thinking, using scientific evidence and reasoning to construct original arguments, and applying conventions and problem-solving skills to craft successful documents. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Prereq., IPHY 2800. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: written communication.

International Affairs

Global Issues and International Affairs
◆IAFS 1000, 4 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 13693
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Jessica Martin

Introduces the student to the international affairs program. The course examines political and economic development in several countries in many different world regions. Examines historical trends and development as well as current political and economic issues. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

Special Topics in International Affairs: Food, Agriculture, and Development
IAFS 3000, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 17724
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Elizabeth Dunn

Where does the food you eat come from, and what kinds of global connections does it create? We will investigate the global food system to understand where food products come from, the conditions under which they are produced, and the kinds of political and economic relationships that global agriculture creates. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours.

Italian

Beginning Italian 1
◆ITAL 1010, 5 semester hours, Section 400, Class No. 18166
Session D: June 2–August 8, 2014
Giorgio Corda

The four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing are progressively developed in a predominantly oral presentation. Grammatical concepts are explained and practiced through dialogues, written exercises, and conversations. The cultural focus is on the personal world and life of students. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: foreign language.

That’s Amore: Introduction to Italian Culture
◆ITAL 1500, 3 semester hours, Section 300, Class No. 13448
Session C: June 2–July 25, 2014
Valerio Ferme

Introduces students to representations of Italian society that have persisted through the ages. The course readings allow students to better understand how certain stereotypes about Italian society (e.g., Latin lover, Mafia) were born and persist in the present. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Taught in English. Restricted to freshmen and sophomores. Approved for GT-AH2. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

Neuroscience

Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
NRSC 4032, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 17284
NRSC 5032, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 17285
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Jerry Rudy

Provides a comprehensive treatment of how the brain acquires, stores, and retrieves memories. To do this we will consider (a) the methods used to address these issues, (b) what we know about how brain systems are organized to support memories of different types, and (c) the synaptic mechanisms that are involved. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Prereqs., PSCY 2012 or 4052, or IPHY 3730, or NRSC 2100 or 4052, or instructor consent. Restricted to juniors and seniors. Formerly PSYC 4132.

Philosophy

Symbolic Logic
PHIL 2440, 3 semester hours, Section 300, Class No. 13878
Session C: June 2–July 25, 2014
Robert Rupert

First course in mathematical logic. Topics include sentential logic, the logic of quantification, and some of the basic concepts and results of metalogic (interpretations, validity, and soundness). This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course.

Political Science

Introduction to International Relations
◆PSCI 2223, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 17546
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Steve Chan

Introduces the field of international relations, with general survey of the theories, histories, and problems of historical and contemporary relations among state and nonstate actors. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

U.S. Campaigns and Elections
◆PSCI 3021, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 13726
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Kenneth Bickers

Introduces students to the subjects, techniques, and findings of Political Science research on campaigns and elections. Particular emphasis is placed on the study of voting, campaign effects, partisan coalitions, electoral rules, campaign finance, and the policy impact of elections. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Prereq., PSCI 1101. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context.

Psychology

Advanced Topics in Social Psychology: Environmental Psychology
PSYC 4606, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 18548
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Leaf Van Boven

This is a course on social psychology as it pertains to the natural environment.  We will consider how the environment influences human psychology, how human psychology influences the environment, and how human psychology poses a barrier to solving environmental problems. Part of our focus will be on basic science—the study of affect, behavior, and cognition—as an end in and of itself within the natural environment. We will also adopt an applied stance in which we consider ways that psychological research and theory can be brought to bear on encouraging environmentally responsible and sustainable practices. Because human behavior plays such an important role in environmental problems, a consideration of human psychology is an important part of solving environmental problems. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours, provided the topics vary. Prereqs., PSYC 1001, 2626, and 3101.

Religious Studies

Christian Traditions
◆RLST 3000, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 18221
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Brian Catlos

Studies the origins and development of various aspects of Christian tradition as expressed through scripture, theology, ritual, church order, ethics, and the arts. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

Dancing, Religion, and Culture
RLST 3838, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 15021
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Sam Gill

A critical examination of the received cultural, religious, and academic understandings of dancing and the body; the construction of a richer theory of dancing that will more adequately support comparative studies; the study of dancing in cultures and religions in a diverse representation of cultures; and a more in depth social study of Latin American dancing including actual dancing experience. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course.

Russian

Introduction to Modern Russian Culture
◆RUSS 2221, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 18530
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Mark Leiderman

Introduces students to major trends in Russian culture from the 1890’s to the present, through the study of literature, art, architecture, music, journalism, and film in an historical context. Addresses such questions as: how have past events affected Russian society? How can we use knowledge about Russia’s past to understand social and cultural forces today? This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Taught in English. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

Sociology

Introduction to Sociology
◆SOCY 1001, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 14778
Session B: July 8–August 8, 2014
Tim Wadsworth

Examines basic sociological ideas including social relations, social interaction, social structure, and social change. Examples are drawn from societies around the world. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Meets MAPS requirement for social science: general. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

Topics on Population Health: Death and Dying
SOCY 3042, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 18258
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Liane Pedersen-Gallegos

Addresses sociological aspects of the study of death and dying, with a focus on the social meaning of death and its normative treatment in western history and in the contemporary United States. Units of study include, but are not limited to: grief, suicide, funeral rituals, hospice, and euthanasia. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Students will learn in a non-confrontive environment. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours for different topics. Prereq., SOCY 1001.

Global Human Ecology
SOCY 4007, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 18264
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Lori Hunter

Examines global environmental issues from sociological perspectives. Focuses on such problems as overpopulation, world hunger and poverty, pollution, resource shortages, environmental impact of technology and population dynamics, public policy, and strategies for chance. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Credit not granted for this course and SOCY 1002 or SEWL 2000.

Sociology of Religion
◆SOCY 4121, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 17466
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Liane Pedersen-Gallegos

Examines complex interactions between religious and other social structures, such as the economy, government, and the family, and how globalization is affecting religious traditions across the globe. Includes discussion of how various religions are used or misused to justify terrorism and other acts of violence. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Prereqs., SOCY 1001, and SOCY 3001 or 3011. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

Women and Gender Studies

Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context
◆WMST 2600, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 15014
Session A: June 2–July 3, 2014
Lorraine Bayard de Volo

Examines the positionality of women in terms of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and power relations in a global context. This course will be taught entirely online. You must have a reliable Internet connection to access and complete this course. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

◆fulfills arts and sciences core