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College of Arts and Sciences

Applied Mathematics

Calculus 2 for Engineers

APPM 1360, 4 semester hours, Section 400, Class No. 19237
Session D: June 1–August 7, 2015
Silva Chang
Continuation of APPM 1350. Focuses on applications of the definite integral, methods of integration, improper integrals, Taylor’s theorem, and infinite series. Credit not granted for this course and MATH 2300. This section requires proctored examinations.

Economics

Introduction to Statistics with Computer Applications

ECON 3818, 4 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 15952
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
D. Waldman
Introduces statistical methods and their applications in quantitative economic analysis.

English

Shakespeare for Nonmajors

◆ENGL 3000, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 11566
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Katherine Eggert
Introduction to Shakespeare. Introduces students to 6-10 of Shakespeare’s major plays. Comedies, histories, and tragedies will be studied. Some non-dramatic poetry may be included. Viewing of Shakespeare in performance is often required. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

Modern and Contemporary Literature for Nonmajors

◆ENGL 3060, 3 semester hours
Section 100, Class No. 11568
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Laura Winkiel
Section 101, Class No. 11569
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Susan Zemka
Section 200, Class No. 15929
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Jeremy Green
Close study of significant 20th century poetry, drama, and prose works. Readings range from 1920s to the present. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

Topics in Popular Culture: The Werewolf

ENGL 3246, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 13073
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Stephen Graham Jones
Werewolves have been with us nearly as long as we’ve been walking on two legs, and running away from things. In here we’ll look at where they’re from, at why we’ve kept them around, and we’ll dissect the different types as they appear in folklore, literature, film, and beyond. Are they cautionary tale or a fantasy creature? Do we use them to see ourselves better, or are they reminders of our tenuous place in the world? All this and more, and in four weeks. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours for different topics.

Environmental Studies

Topics in Applied Environmental Studies: Crowdsource Mapping

ENVS 3100, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 19264
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Joel Hartter
Covers a variety of topics not currently offered in the curriculum; offered depending upon instructor availability and student demand.  Fulfills application requirement for Environmental Studies major. Prereq., ENVS 1000. May be repeated up to 8 total credit hours, provided topics vary.

French

Beginning French 1

◆FREN 1010, 5 semester hours, Section 400, Class No. 18982
Session D: June 1–August 7, 2015
Faculty to be announced
For students with no previous knowledge of French. Presents basic grammar and most commonly used French vocabulary. Introduces students to Francophone culture. Credit not granted for this course and FREN 1050. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: foreign language.

Beginning French 2

◆FREN 1020, 5 semester hours, Section 400, Class No. 15899
Session D: June 1–August 7, 2015
Faculty to be announced
Continuation of FREN 1010. Completes the presentation of most basic structures and French vocabulary. Credit not granted for this course and FREN 1050. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: foreign language.

German

The Enlightenment: Tolerance and Emancipation

◆GRMN 3505, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 11540
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Ann Schmiesing
Examines Enlightenment notions of reason, humanity, and social progress. Topics include 18th century views on government, science, education, religion, slavery, and gender roles. Taught in English. Same as HUMN 3505. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

German Film and Society after 1989

GRMN 3514, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 15935
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Beverly Weber
Introduces post-1989 German culture through film. The course emphasizes films in their socio-historical contexts and explores developments in German culture during and after the unification. Taught in English. Same as FILM 3514.

History

History of Christianity 1: To the Reformation

◆HIST 2170, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 15656
Scott Bruce
General introduction to the history of Christianity from its beginnings through the first period of the Protestant Reformation. Examines religious life and the church in relation to its social and cultural setting. Approved for GT-HI1. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

America through Baseball

◆HIST 2516, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 11595
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Thomas Zeiler
Baseball could not have existed without America. Course explains how the game fit into the larger context of social, cultural, economic, and political history from the nineteenth century to the present. Studies the events and people who made baseball the national pastime. Similar to HIST 4556. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context.

Africa under European Colonial Rule

HIST 4258, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 18923
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Myles Osborne
Focuses on the political, economic, and social dimensions of colonialism, as well as African nationalism and decolonization.

Integrative Physiology

Scientific Writing in Integrative Physiology

◆IPHY 3700, 3 semester hours, Section 301, Class No. 15938
Session C: June 1–July 24, 2015
Marie Boyko
Takes a process-based approach to writing. Assignments and classroom experiences emphasize critical thinking, using scientific evidence and reasoning to construct original arguments, and applying conventions and problem-solving skills to craft successful documents. Department enforced requisite: IPHY 2800 or equivalent. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: written communication.

Seminar in Integrative Physiology: Movement Disorders

IPHY 4010, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 18974
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Janet Casagrand
Focuses on examining the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of conditions affecting movement. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours when topics vary. Department enforced requisite: IPHY 2800 or equivalent.

International Affairs

Global Issues and International Affairs

◆IAFS 1000, 4 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 11773
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Jessica Martin
Introduces the student to the international affairs program. The course examines political and economic development in several countries in many different world regions. Examines historical trends and development as well as current political and economic issues. Approved for GT-SS3. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

Special Topics in International Affairs: Gender, Geopolitics, and Islam

IAFS 3000, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 18988
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Jennifer Fluri
Designed to introduce key topics of interest to the international community but also to many of the best known organizations, media outlets, and authors within the international affairs community. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours.

Italian

Beginning Italian 1

◆ITAL 1010, 5 semester hours, Section 400, Class No. 15860
Session D: June 1–August 7, 2015
Faculty to be announced
The four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing are progressively developed in a predominantly oral presentation. Grammatical concepts are explained and practiced through dialogues, written exercises, and conversations. The cultural focus is on the personal world and life of students. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: foreign language.

Neuroscience

Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

NRSC 4032, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 15328
NRSC 5032, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 15329
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Jerry Rudy
Provides a comprehensive treatment of how the brain acquires, stores, and retrieves memories. To do this we will consider (a) the methods used to address these issues, (b) what we know about how brain systems are organized to support memories of different types, and (c) the synaptic mechanisms that are involved. NRSC 4032 was formerly PSYC 4032.

Philosophy

Symbolic Logic

PHIL 2440, 3 semester hours, Section 300, Class No. 11953
Session C: June 1–July 24, 2015
Robert Rupert
First course in mathematical logic. Topics include sentential logic, the logic of quantification, and some of the basic concepts and results of metalogic (interpretations, validity, and soundness).

Political Science

Introduction to International Relations

◆PSCI 2223, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 15558
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Steve Chan
Introduces the field of international relations, with general survey of the theories, histories, and problems of historical and contemporary relations among state and nonstate actors. Approved for GT-SS1. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

U.S. Campaigns and Elections

◆PSCI 3021, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 11805
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Kenneth Bickers
Introduces students to the subjects, techniques, and findings of Political Science research on campaigns and elections. Particular emphasis is placed on the study of voting, campaign effects, partisan coalitions, electoral rules, campaign finance, and the policy impact of elections. Recommended prereq., PSCI 1101. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context.

International Behavior

PSCI 3193, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 15967
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Moonhawk Kim
Presents alternate theoretical frameworks for the explanation of international processes. Applies theories of conflict behavior and social organization to problems of war and peace. Recommended prereq., PSCI 2223.

Psychology

Social Psychology

◆PSYC 2606, 3 semester hours, Section 110, Class No. 19126
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Irene Blair
Covers general psychological principles underlying social behavior. Analyzes major social psychological theories, methods, and topics, including attitudes, conformity, aggression, attraction, social perception, helping behavior, and group relations. Approved for GT-SS3. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

Religious Studies

Religion and Contemporary Society

◆RLST 2400, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 18953
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Ira Chernus
Studies the nature of contemporary American society from various theoretical perspectives in religious studies. Gives attention to the impact of secularization and to the religious elements found in aspects of secular life (e.g., politics, literature, education, and recreation). Approved for GT-SS3. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

Christian Traditions

◆RLST 3000, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 15897
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Brian Catlos
Serves as an introduction to the academic study of Christianity, understood in its historical context, beginning with its most remote Mesopotamian origins and through to beginnings of the Protestant Reformation. Coverage is global, but “Western” Christian tradition are emphasized, as is the evolution of doctrine, ritual and institutions in relation to social, cultural and political factors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

Dancing, Religion, and Culture

RLST 3838, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 13075
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Sam Gill
A critical examination of the received cultural, religious, and academic understandings of dancing and the body; the construction of a richer theory of dancing that will more adequately support comparative studies; the study of dancing in cultures and religions in a diverse representation of cultures; and a more in depth social study of Latin American dancing including actual dancing experience.

Russian

Introduction to Modern Russian Culture

◆RUSS 2221, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 15936
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Mark Leiderman
Introduces students to major trends in Russian culture from the 1890’s to the present, through the study of literature, art, architecture, music, journalism, and film in an historical context. Addresses such questions as: how have past events affected Russian society? How can we use knowledge about Russia’s past to understand social and cultural forces today? Taught in English. Students may not receive credit for both RUSS 2221 and LIBB 2100. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

Sports and the Cold War

◆RUSS 2222, 3 semester hours, Section 200, Class No. 18899
Session B: July 7–August 7, 2015
Artemi Romanov
Explores the multiple connections between sports and international politics during the Cold War in the Post-War period. Examines how the issues of class, nation, ethnicity, and gender intersect with sports and international politics by studying cases from various sport events since 1945. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

Fairy Tales of Russia

◆RUSS 2231, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 18892
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Vicki Grove
Provides a general introduction to fairy tales including various theoretical approaches to classifying and interpreting them; introduces students to a wide selection of Russian folk and fairy tales. Examines the cultural, social, and political values they reflect, as well as the continuing influence of fairy tales and folk beliefs in Russian literature, music, folk art, and film, as well as in the political propaganda of the 20th century. Taught in English. Approved for GT-AH2. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

Sociology

Introduction to Sociology

◆SOCY 1001, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 12844
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Thomas Wadsworth
Examines basic sociological ideas including social relations, social interaction, social structure, and social change. Examples are drawn from societies around the world. Meets MAPS requirement for social science: general. Approved for GT-SS3. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

Topics in Population and Health: Death and Dying

SOCY 3042, 3 semester hours, Section 400, Class No. 15905
Session D: June 1–August 7, 2015
Liane Pedersen-Gallegos
Addresses sociological aspects of the study of death and dying, with a focus on the social meaning of death and its normative treatment in western history and in the contemporary United States. Units of study include, but are not limited to: grief, suicide, funeral rituals, hospice, and euthanasia. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours for different topics.

Global Human Ecology

SOCY 4007, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 15908
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Lori Hunter
Examines global environmental issues from sociological perspectives. Focuses on such problems as overpopulation, world hunger and poverty, pollution, resource shortages, environmental impact of technology and population dynamics, public policy, and strategies for change. Credit not granted for this course and SOCY 1002 or SEWL 2000.

Sociology of Religion

◆SOCY 4121, 3 semester hours, Section 400, Class No. 15961
Session D: June 1–August 7, 2015
Liane Pedersen-Gallegos
Examines complex interactions between religious and other social structures, such as the economy, government, and the family, and how globalization is affecting religious traditions across the globe. Includes discussion of how various religions are used or misused to justify terrorism and other acts of violence. Recommended prereq., SOCY 3001. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

Women and Gender Studies

Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context

◆WMST 2600, 3 semester hours, Section 100, Class No. 13070
Session A: June 1–July 2, 2015
Lorraine Bayard de Volo
Examines the positionality of women in terms of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and power relations in a global context. Approved for GT-SS3. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

◆=fulfills arts and sciences core curriculum